GPS Cycle and Walking Routes


Mountain and Hill Walks

This page shows some of the finest climbs in Britain. There is a mixture of fairly easy hills and strenuous mountain climbs. You will be rewarded with some truly wonderful views.

Please use the links below to view full route information including descriptions, elevation profiles, interactive maps and GPS downloads.

You can also view an overview map of all the routes in the using the Mountain and Hill Walk Map


Route NamePhotoDistanceDescription
Alderley Edge4 miles (7 km)This lovely circular walk explores the beautiful National Trust owned area of Alderley Edge. Starting at Alderley Edge train station you climb to a sandstone escarpment, where there are fabulous over the Cheshire Plain to the Peak District. You return through a delightful wooded area, passing a waterfall, before arriving back at Alderley Edge train station. View Full Details>>
Alport Castles10 miles (16 km)This walk visits this extraordinary geological feature in the Peak District National Park. Alport Castles is a spectacular formation of rocks formed from numerous landslides over a period of time. The largest of these, resembles a full-scalemotte and baileycastle. It's a fabulous sight and is surrounded by some stunning Peak District scenery. Bird watchers can look out for peregrine falconsnesting on the crags.
This circular walk starts at the parking area at the northern end of Ladybower Reservoir. You then follow a footpath along Derwent Reservoir and Howden Reservoir, passing through woodland with views of the impressive Howden Dam on the way. The walk then climbs away from the reservoir towards Alport Castles. Here you can enjoy wonderful views over the River Alportand Alport Dale. The walk then descends to Hagg Side woodland before returning to Ladybower Reservoir.
To extend your walking in the are you could try the fantastic climbs to Derwent Edge and Stanage Edge. View Full Details>>
An Sgurr Eigg5 miles (7.5 km)Climb to the highest point on the volcanic island of Eigg on this challenging walk in the Scottish Inner Hebrides. From the 393 metres (1,289ft) summit there are spectacular views all round ofMull,Coll,Muck, theOuter Hebrides, Rum, Skye, and the mountains ofLochaberon the mainland.
The walk starts at the ferry terminal and follows a waymarked route through Galmisdale and heather and bracken moorland to the summit. View Full Details>>
Angle Tarn5 miles (8 km)This walk climbs to Angletarn Pikes from Patterdale in the Lake District. The area is a favourite of many with Angle Tarn considered one of the most beautiful spots in the Lake District. Alfred Wainwright described it as'among the best of Lakeland tarns'. On the walk you will also enjoy super views over Ullswater Lake and the surrounding fells.
The walk starts at the parking area in Patterdale and climbs to Boredale Hause. You continue to Stony Rigg and then on to Angletarn Pikes. The Pikes are named after the two rocky towers at the summit, separated by a long section of peaty bog. From here there are great views down to Angle Tarn and over to the Helvellynrange and theFar Eastern Fellsacross Martindale. You then descend to the tarn for a waterside section before returning to Patterdale on the same route. Alternatively, you could continue past the tarn and head towards The Knott and Hayeswater to extend your walk. Brothers Water is also nearby and is another good walk to try in the area. View Full Details>>
Ankerdine Hill1 miles (1 km)Climb to this hill in Knightwick on this walk in the Malvern Hills. There's a nice waterside stretch along the River Teme, woodland trails and great views from the high points.
The circular walk starts in the village of Knightwick and heads to Horsham Farm along the River Teme. You then climb through Hay Wood to Ankerdine Hill which reaches a height of well over 400ft. On the hill there's some nice woodland trails and great views over the Worcestershire countryside.
This walk uses part of the Worcestershire Way to climb the hill. You could pick up the trail to extend your walk. Heading north will take you to Woodbury Hill while heading south will take you to Ravenshill Wood. View Full Details>>
Aran Fawddwy10 miles (16 km)Climb to the 905m (2,969ft) summit of this mountain in southern Snowdonia and enjoy breathtaking panoramic views. The mountain is only (31ft) short of being a member of theWelsh 3000s.
The walk starts from the village of Llanuwchllynnear the southern end of Bala Lake. You can park in the village or catch the Bala Lake Railway to Llanuwchllynand start the walk from there. From the village you head south and pick up the Aran Ridge footpath. You first climb to Aran Benllyn, passing Llyn Lliwbran on the way. You continue to Aran Fawddwy with lovely views down to the lake of Creiglyn Dyfi.
It's a challenging climb but with some wonderful views towards the Rhinog mountains, the Berwyns and the rest of the Arans. The walk can also be attempted from Cwm Cywarch.
To continue your walking in the area you can try the Bala Lake Walk. Footpaths climb into the hills and forests above the lake with wonderful views over the water and surrounding mountains. View Full Details>>
Arnside Knott2 miles (2.5 km)This small hill in Arnside is a popular beauty spot and internationally important wildlife area. The hill is a mixture of limestone grassland, woodland, wet meadow, scree and scrub. It is renowned for its butterflies and flowers. From the high point there are fabulous views over Silverdale and the coastal estuary towards Grange over Sands, Morecambe Bay and the Lake District fells.
This circular walk starts at the car park by the hill and takes you to the viewpoint and through the woodland on public footpaths.
You can continue your walk by picking up the Cumbria Coastal Way which starts at the nearby Milnthorpe Sands. Or you could visit the nearby Leighton Moss Nature Reserve. Also nearby is Warton Crag nature reserve with its rare butterflies and plants.
Just to the south, you can follow footpaths to Eaves Wood and enjoy a climb to the Victorian Pepperpot monument on King William's Hill. View Full Details>>
Ashurst Beacon5 miles (8 km)This walk is a moderate climb to Ashurst Hill from the Lancashire village of Appley Bridge. It's a circular walk, taking in some lovely Lancashire countryside with splendid views and a nice waterside stroll along the Leeds and Liverpool Canal.
The walk starts from the train station at Appley Bridge and heads south west along country lanes and public footpaths to the beacon. From the 172m (564ft) summit there are wonderful views to the coast and Blackpool Tower.
After taking in the fine views, the walk descends past Dalton to the River Douglas and the canal. Here you can enjoy a stroll along the water before returning to the train station.
You can extend your walking in the area by climbing to the nearby Parbold Hill. It's only about a mile west of the station and affords more great views to the Pennines and the Welsh Mountains.
Also near the station is the delightful Fairy Glen. The hidden beauty spot includes pretty streams, beautifulwaterfalls, dramatic cliff faces, wooden bridges and shady woodland trails. View Full Details>>
Bamford Edge4 miles (6 km)Climb to Bamford Edge on this exhilarating walk in the Peak District. The walk is geologically significant with lots of interestinggritstone rock formations to look out for. From the elevated position of Bamford Edge there are simply wonderful views over the surrounding area.
The walk starts from the Derbyshire village of Bamford and climbs on country lanes towards Bole Hill and Bamford Clough. You then head north and pick up the Bamford Edge footpath on Bamford Moor. There are splendid views across the Peak District Hope Valley and down to the lovely Ladybower Reservoir below.
The walk can be extended by continuing to Stanage Edge just east of Bamford Edge. Here you will find a stunning gritstoneescarpment of Stanage Edge and the peak of High Neb. From here you can enjoy wonderful views over the Hallam Moors and the Hope Valley.
You could also descend to Ladybower Reservoir and enjoy the woodland trails along the water.
The Derwent Valley Heritage Way runs past Bamford so this is another option. You could follow the riverside path into Hathersage for example. The walk could also be started from Hathersage following the River Derwent to Bamford and then ascending from there.
Just to the west you can enjoy a climb to Win Hill which has some of the best views in the area. View Full Details>>
Barbon Beck Barbondale9 miles (15 km)This lovely valley in the Cumbrian section of the Yorkshire Dales is a great place for a peaceful, waterside walk. It can also be made into a challenging circular walk by climbing Castle Knott Hill and Calf Top Hill.
The walk starts from the village of Barbon which is located just a few miles north east of Kirkby Lonsdale. The Barbon Beck runs through the village to the River Lune, about one mile to the west. After leaving the village you climb to Eskhome Pike, Castle Knott Hill and Calf Top Hill. It's a challenging climb with Calf Top Hill reaching a height of 609m (2000 ft). From the high points there are splendid views of the surrounding fells and countryside.
The route then descends from Calf Top to Hanging Clint and Rowel Gill. Here you pick up the much easier path along the beck through Barbondale. On the way you'll pass a series of pretty waterfalls and a woodland section at Barbon Manor.
For an easier walk you can just take the southern section of the path along the Beck which is very flat.
To extend your walking in the area you could head to Kirkby Lonsdale, pick up the Lune Valley Ramble and enjoy another waterside walk along the River Lune.
You could also follow the Limestone Link to Hutton Roof Crags and Farleton Fell where you will find some of the finestlimestone pavement in the country. View Full Details>>
Bardon Hill2 miles (4 km)Climb to the highest point in Leicestershire on this walk near Coalville. The hill is located just a couple of miles east of Coalville town centre. A good start point for the walk is the village of Whitwick just to the north of the hill. From here you can follow the Ivanhoe Way long distance trail to the hill. It's about a 2.5 mile walk from the village to the 912 feet (278m) high hill summit where you will find a radio mast and wonderful views over the Charnwood Forest and the extensive Bardon Hill quarry below. On a clear day you can see as far as the Malvern Hills, the Shropshire Hills and the Peak District.
To extend your walking in the area you could pick up the Charnwood Forest circular walk which runs past the hill. Following it south will take you to the village of Markfield which is an alternative start point for visiting the hill. View Full Details>>
Beamsley Beacon3 miles (5.5 km)This short climb in the Yorkshire Dales visits Beamsley Beacon which is also known as Howber Hill. It's located close to the little village of Beamsleyin the Craven district of North Yorkshire. You can start the walk from here and then follow a mixture of country lanes and public footpaths to the hill. The summit stands at a height of 326 metres (1,070ft) and includes a number of stone cairns, dating from the Bronze Age.From the peak there are splendid views over the surrounding hills and countryside including the nearby Chelker Reservoir. You can extend the walk by continuing on to Old Pike.
Beamsley is located very close to the wonderful Bolton Abbey. You can extend your walk by following the nature trails along the River Wharfe and it's surrounding woodland. The Dales Way also passes through the area. You could visit the beacon from Ilkley by following the long distance trail along the river to Beamsleyvillage.
There are also public footpaths that will take you to Chelker Reservoir just to the west of the hill. View Full Details>>
Beinn Dubh4 miles (6.5 km)This is a lovely walk to try if you are visiting the pretty Luss Village in the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park. The short climb gives fabulous views over the surrounding area.
The walk starts in Luss at the car park and visitor centre. You then follow a footpath out of the village through some woodland before climbing Beinn Dubh on a nice grassy path. There are simply wonderful views of Loch Lomond, Glen Lussand the Arrochar Alps to enjoy. You can return the same way or continue to Mid Hill along the Glen Striddle Horseshoe. View Full Details>>
Beinn Eighe3 miles (5 km)Follow the Beinn Eighe Mountain Trail through a beautiful nature reserve on this circular walk near Kinlochewe. On the walk you will pass attractive pinewood woodland, mountainous lochs, white quartzite crags and pretty waterfalls. The views over Loch Maree and the Torridon Mountains are simply stunning.
The route starts from the car park at the southern end of Loch Maree. From here you gain access to the waymarked mountain trail. The trail climbs through woodland and past burns and waterfalls to the high point where you will find a small loch and a cairn.
It's a challenging walk with steep and rocky sections. View Full Details>>
Ben Avon21 miles (33 km)This challenging walk in the Cairngorms takes you to the unusual Ben Avon plateau with its numerous granite torsand wonderful far reaching views. You start in Braemar in a parking area just off the Old Military Road to the east of the village. You then pick up the Gleann an t-Slugain path which will take you to Ben Avon. It's generally a very good path passing through woodland, along pretty streams and through the delightful Fairy Glen. On the way you'll enjoy great views over Glen Quoich, Glas Allt Mor and Slochd Mor. At the summit you will find the huge Leabaidh an DaimhTor. Some scrambling is required to get to the true summit where there are excellent views of Beinn a'Bhuird mountain.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could head to Linn of Dee and Linn of Quoich which are both near Braemar. View Full Details>>
Ben Bhraggie5 miles (8.5 km)This circular walk climbs Ben Bhraggie hill in Golspie. The hill stands at a height of 397 metres (1,302ft) giving fabulous views over Sutherland. At the summit you will find the Sutherland monument. The 100ft statue represents George Leveson-Gower, the first Duke of Sutherland. He remains a controversial figure for the part he played in the Highland Clearances where thousands of Sutherland tenants were forced out of their homes in the early 19th century.
The walk begins in the pretty village of Golspie on theNorth Seacoast. You then follow waymarked paths through forest and over heather moorland to the summit. You descend to Golspie on more woodland trails through Ben Bhraggie Wood.
The area is also fantastic for mountain biking with a wildcat trail billed as the longest freeride descent in the UK. View Full Details>>
Ben Lawers6 miles (10 km)Ben Lawers is one of the most popular climbs in Scotland due to the beauty of the surrounding area. It is also designated as a National Nature Reserve and run by the National Trust for Scotland.
The walk starts at the Ben Lawers car park and follows a nature trail through woodland with wild flowers and views of the Edramucky Burn. The path continues towards Beinn Ghlaswith wonderful views of Loch Tay and other munros such as Meall Corranaic and Meall nan Tarmachan. The path then reaches the 1,214m (3,983ft) Ben Lawers summit with magnificent views of Ben Lomond and Glencoe to the west, and the Cairngorms to the north.
It is a steep climb to the summit but on a good path for most of the way. The reserve is populated with many interesting arctic-alpine flora including purple saxifrage, moss campion, yellow saxifrage, globeflower and rose root. Also look out for a variety of wildlife including whinchat, stonechat, willow warblers,ring ouzels, red grouse, ptarmigan and red deer.
The Rob Roy Way runs past the nearby Loch Tay and Killin. This is a good option if you would like to continue your walking in the area. View Full Details>>
Ben Ledi4 miles (7 km)Climb to this popular viewpoint on this challenging walk in the Trossachs. The mountain gives fabulous views over the woodland and lochs of the Queen Elizabeth Forest Park.
There's a car park at Creag Dhubh, just off the A84, about 2 miles west of Callander. From here you can pick up the tracks to take you through woodland and then up on to the mountain peak. It's about a 2.5 climb from the car park to the 879m (2,884ft) summit of Ben Ledi. There's fabulous views of Loch Lubnaig and Callander, while on a clear day you can see as far as the Wallace Monument and Stirling Castle. There's also splendid views of some of the most famous mountains of the area including Ben Lawers and Ben Lomond.
To extend your exercise in the area you could enjoy a waterside cycle or walk along Loch Lubnaig and visit the delightful Falls of Leny on the way. The Rob Roy Way also passes through the area so you could futher explore the Queen Elizabeth Forest Park by picking up the trail and visiting Loch Venachar and Loch Drunkie. View Full Details>>
Ben Lomond7 miles (11.5 km)Climb one of Scotland's most popular munros on this challenging walk in the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park. The mountains sits on the eastern shore ofLoch Lomond rising to a height of 974 metres (3,196ft). The climb takes place on a good path with a steady gradient, starting from the Rowardennancar park. The first section takes you through woodland towards Coire Corrach. You continue the ascent to Sron Aonaich and Sithean before reaching the summit where there are fabulous views across Loch Lomond & the Trossachs National Park.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area then you pick up the West Highland Way and enjoy a walk along Loch Lomond. View Full Details>>
Ben Lui5 miles (8 km)Climb to the 1,130m (3,710ft) summit of this famous Munro in the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park. The peaks of Ben Lui are designated as a National Nature Reserve with lush mountain vegitation including saxifrages,mossesandlichens.
This walk starts from the car park in Glen Lochy just off the A85 and crosses the River Lochy before a pleasant woodland section along a burn. After leaving the woodland you continue the climb past Fionn Choire to the summit where you can enjoy wonderful views of the surrounding peaks. You can extend your walk by heading to Beinn a' Chleibh which lies about 1.5 miles to the south west. View Full Details>>
Ben Macdui10 miles (16 km)Climb to the summit of the second highest mountain in Britain on this challenging walk in the Cairngorms. The walk starts from the Cairngorm Ski Centre car park and climbs to the summit via the MiadanCreag an Leth-choin ridge, passing Lochan Buidhe on the way. You can return the same way or head to the nearby Cairn Gorm by taking the north east path at Lochan Buidhe. View Full Details>>
Ben Nevis Mountain Track11 miles (17 km)Follow the Ben Nevis Mountain Track (or Tourist Route) up Britain's highest mountain on this spectacular walk. The walk begins in the Glen Nevis visitor centre car park in the town of Fort William in the Scottish Highlands. The visitor centre has a wealth of advice and information and is well worth visiting particularly if you are not an experience hill climber. This route is the most straightforward path up the mountain but is still strenuous with the upper section particularly rough and stony. As such you should prepare properly for the walk with good walking boots, extra clothing and plenty of food and water. It usually takes 7-10 hours for the ascent and descent so it is best attempted in the summer months when there is plenty of daylight.
After leaving the visitor centre you will cross the River Nevis before starting the climb. As you climb the path you will enjoy spectacular views of Glen Nevis, the Mamores and Stob Ban. You will also cross pretty streams and pass the tranquil Loch Meall. At the summit you will find several memorials, a trig point, and many cairns. The views of the highlands are truly magnificent. You then return to the start point by the same route. View Full Details>>
Ben Venue9 miles (14 km)This challenging walk climbs the popular mountain of Ben Venue in the Trossachs. There's fabulous views over the surrounding mountains, lochs and forestry from the high points.
The route starts from the Ben Venue car park off the A821 at the western end of Loch Achray. From here you can pick up woodland trails along Achray Water to Gleann Riabhach. As you ascend the mountain you can enjoy wonderful views back down to the huge Loch Katrine and Loch Venachar. There's also far reaching views of the area's other mountains, particularly Ben Lomond. At the 729m (2,392ft) summit you can see as far as the Firth of Forth, the Isle of Arranand thePaps of Jura on a clear day. See the drone footage video below to appreciate the majestic surroundings.
The mountain sits in the wonderful Queen Elizabeth Forest Park where there are miles of other cycling and walking trails to try. For example you can extend your exercise by following the wonderful cycle and walking path along the northern side of Loch Katrine.
Glen Finglas is also nearby. Here you can enjoy woodland trails, open heathland, rushing streams, waterfalls and challenging hill climbs. View Full Details>>
Bickerton Hill and Maiden Castle2 miles (3.5 km)This walk uses part of the Sandstone Trail to visit Maiden Castle Iron Age hill fort and Bickerton Hill. It's a lovely area with the hills covered in pretty heather, bilberry bushes and yellow gorse. You'll reach a height of over 700ft with wonderful views over the Cheshire countryside to enjoy. The area is managed by the National Trust so there are good footpaths and conveniently located car parks.
You can start your walk from the car park off the Old Coach Road near the village of Duckington. From here pick up the Sandstone Trail and climb through woodland to Larkton Hill and Maiden Castle. The hill fort dates from 600BCcommanding a fine view over theCheshire Plain.
From the fort you continue east to Gallantry Bank before turning north to climb to Raw Head, the highest point on the Bickerton Hills. Raw Head stands at a height of 227m (745ft) with more great views to enjoy from here.
The area is well known for its varied flora and fauna. The attractive woodland areas consist of silver birch, aspen,holly,rowan,sessile oakandwild cherry trees. Look out for a wide variety of butterflies such as gatekeeper,red admiral,speckled woodandtortoiseshell. Interesting bird sightings include buzzard, kestrel, jay,long-tailed tit,magpie,nuthatch,raven,treecreeper andgreen woodpeckers.
To extend your walk you can continue east along the Sandstone Trail to Bulkeley Hill and then explore the Peckforton Hills. View Full Details>>
Birchen Edge2 miles (2.5 km)Climb to this gritstone edge and enjoy wonderful views over the Derwent Valley in the Peak District. You can start the walk from the Robin Hood pub car park just to the south of Birchen Edge. From here you can pick up the footpaths to take you across the gritstone edge to the wonderful view point where you will find Nelson's Monument. Next to this are three boulders carved with the names of three of Nelson's ships:Victory,DefianceandRoyal Soverin.It's a splendid spot with interesting rock formations and fabulous views over the surrounding area.
Just to the west you'll find Gardom's Edge. A public footpath runs past it towards Eagle Stone and Baslow Edge. This is a good option if you'd like to further explore this geologically fascinating area. You should see lots of rock climbers as you go.
Birchen Edge is located very close to the splendid Chatsworth Park. Here you'll find 1000 acres of parkland to explore with views of the River Derwent, woodland trails and fallow deer. The Derwent Valley Heritage Way also passes nearby Baslow so you can enjoy a riverside stroll through the area.
Also nearby is the spectacular Curbar Edge which has more interesting rock formations and expansive views of the Eastern Moors. View Full Details>>
Black Combe5 miles (8 km)Black Combesits in the south west cornerof the Lake District. It's proximity to the coast means you get fabulous sea views from the 1970foot (600m) summit. On a clear day you can see Wales, Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man. This walk starts from a parking area off the A5093 near Silecroft. You can also access the route from the nearby Silecroft train station. The route follows good footpaths through Whicham, before climbing to Townend Knotts and on to the Black Combe summit. The views are magnificent with the Pennine Hills, theForest of Bowland, Blackpool Tower, Snowdon and Scaffel Pike all visible on a clear day. You can descend by the same path or continue round to Whitbeck to turn it into a circular walk.
This walk shows a direct route up to the summit but you could also go via White Combe as shown in the video below.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could head to the nearby Hodbarrow Lakes Nature Reserve in Millom. View Full Details>>
Black Down4 miles (6 km)Climb to the highest point in the South Downs on this challenging route in Sussex. The area is run by the National Trust and includes a series of well defined paths taking you to flower-rich meadows, ancient woodland and copses. There are fabulous views over the Weald from the Temple of the Winds, at the southern end of Black down. The English Channel can also be seen through the River Arun gap on a clear day. The circular route below starts at the car park near the Temple of the Winds and takes you north across Black Down to Boarden Door Bottom.
Cyclists can also enjoy a number of easy bridleways or more challenging mountain bike trails which run across the area.
The Sussex Border Path walking trail runs through Black Down so you could pick up this trail and head west to the nearby Marley Common to continue your walk.
Black Down is located just a few miles south of Haslemere town centre. View Full Details>>
Black Rocks Cromford4 miles (6 km)This circular walk visits Black Rocks in the Peak District National Park. The rocks are a striking gritstone outcrop surrounded by the woodland of Cromford Moor. There are wonderful views of the Derwent Valley from the rocks which are in an elevated position above the town of Cromford.
The walk starts by the Cromford Canal and follows the High Peak Trail to Black Rocks. You then head across Cromford Moor with its woodland trails and heather moorland.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area you could enjoy a waterside walk along the Cromford Canal. View Full Details>>
Blackstone Edge2 miles (4 km)Climb to this gritstone escarpment in the Pennine Hills and enjoy wonderful views over Greater Manchester and Yorkshire. The high point stands at 1,549 feet (472 m) with Manchester city centre,Winter Hill and the mountains of north Wales visible on a clear day.
You can start your walk from the car park near Blackstone Edge Reservoir. From here you can pick up the Pennine Way and follow it to the summit. If you continue south along the path it will take you to Rock Stones Hill and Green Hole Hill. Heading north will take you to White Holme Reservoir, Warland Reservoir, Langfield Common and Withens Clough Reservoir.
If you prefer you could start the walk from Hollingworth Lake in Littleborough. There are footpaths across the moors to Blackstone Edge from the town. View Full Details>>
Bleadon Hill2 miles (3.5 km)Enjoy great views to the Somerset Levels and coast on this climb to Bleadon Hill. As well as the views there's lots of flora and fauna to enjoy. Look out for plants including wild thyme, common spotted orchid, pyramidal orchid and bee orchid. You may also see Buzzards flying overhead.
The hill is located just to the south east of Weston-Super-Mare. There is roadside parking on the Roman Road running across the hill. From here you can follow country lanes to Upper Canada before picking up footpaths to take you across the woodland on Hutton Hill. You then follow the West Mendip Way along the Roman Road to take you back to the car park. The walk can be extended by heading south towards the village of Loxton. You can follow the West Mendip Way past Loxton Hill and Loxton Wood to the village. Here you will find the Parish Church of St Andrew which dates from the 11th century.
You could also head to the larger village of Bleadon just to the south west of the hill. Here you will find the Grade I listed Church of St Peter and St Paul which dates from the 14th century. There are also good options for taking on refreshments after your walk.
If you'd like to further extend your walk then head west to the coast and explore the wonderful Brean Down where there are splendid views of theBristol Channel, south Wales and Weston Super Mare.
If you head south east along the trail you can visit the nearby Crook Peak and Wavering Down for more great hill top walking. View Full Details>>
Bleaklow11 miles (17 km)This challenging walk takes you to Bleaklow Head and Bleaklow Stones near Glossop, in the Peak District National Park. The elevated largely peat covered,gritstonemoorland, is popular with walkers.
The walk starts from the car park at Torside Reservoir and follows the Longdendale Trail along the water before picking up the Pennine Way to Torside Clough. The climb continues past Sykes Moor to the 633m (2,077ft) summit of Bleaklow Head. Here you will find a huge cairn of stones and wonderful views across GreaterManchester,Lancashire, Cheshire, theHope Valley,Holme Moss,Emley MoorandYorkshire. Footpaths continue east to the interesting geological formations at Bleaklow Stones.
An alternative route is to go via Wildboar Clough and its lovely waterfalls although this does require some scrambling. This is shown in the video below. View Full Details>>
Blencathra7 miles (11.5 km)This is a fantastic climb to the summit of one of the Lake District's most well known and popular mountains. The walk begins at the parking lot in the pretty village of Threlkeld. You then climb Blencathra (or Saddleback) via Scales Fell, Scales Tarn and Sharp Edge. Sharp Edge is a challenging scramble along a narrow crest. Alfred Wainright describes it thus: 'The crest itself is sharp enough for shaving (the former name was razor edge) and can be traversed onlya chevalat some risk of damage to tender parts.'
From the summit there are fabulous views of the mountains ofGalloway, theSouthern Uplands, the Border hills, the Cheviots, the Penninesand North Wales. Derwent WaterandThirlmerelakes are also visible.
The walk descends to Knowe Crags and Blease Farm before returning to Threlkeld. View Full Details>>
Blorenge7 miles (12 km)This challenging walk takes you around this prominent hill in the southeastern corner of the Brecon Beacons National Park. The hill is located near Abergavennyand rises to a height of 561m (1,841ft).
This popular walk starts at the car park next to Keeper's pond and follows footpaths across the hill before climbing to the summit. There are fabulous views of the Usk Valley, Sugarloaf Mountain and Skirrid Fawr. You'll also pass through the Punchbowl on the eastern side of the hill. This delightful area has a large pond and woodland which attracts a wide variety wildlife.
If you're interested in more hill climbing in the area then Sugarloaf Mountain and Skirrid Fawr are also easily reachable from Abergavenny. View Full Details>>
Blue Bell Hill2 miles (3 km)Visit the Blue Bell Hill viewpoint on this circular walk on the North Downs Way. From the hill there are great views over the River Medway and North Downs. Thesouth west side of Blue Bell Hill is aSite of Special Scientific Interestwith several rare plant species. The hill is also home to Kit's Coty chamber tomb, aNeolithicchambered long barrow which forms part of the Medway megaliths. The megaliths were constructed from localsarsenstone and soil between the 4th and 3rd millennia BCE.
This walk starts from the car park on the hill which gives direct access to the footpaths. These take you across the hill and through woodland, scrub and chalk grasslandwith great views to enjoy. Flora and fauna is intersting with bulbous buttercup, salad burnet, hairy violet, bee orchid and wild strawberry. Look out for butterflies such as dingy skipper, grizzled skipper and chalk hill blue. It's a lovely place to spend a few hours with a picnic site where you can enjoy a snack and take in the views.
The hill is located just south of Chatham, Gillingham and Rochester in Kent. View Full Details>>
Bosley Cloud2 miles (3.5 km)This short circular walk visits the Bosley Cloud hill, near Congleton, on the edge of the Peak District. The hill stands at 343m (1,125ft) and offers wonderful views over Congleton, Greater Manchester and the surrounding Peak District hills and countryside.
You start at the parking area at Timbersbrook and follow the Gritstone Trail to the Cloud summit. You can descend the same way or take an alternative path to the south of the peak. The route follows good waymarked footpaths and includes woodland sections followed by a steep ascent to the craggy sandstone summit. Here you will find a toposcopewhich details the landmarks you can see from the viewpoint. These include the Dane Valley, the Pennine Hills and the Potteries.
If you would like to extend your walk you could continue along the Gritstone Trail or pick up the Maccelsfield Canal on the Cheshire Ring Canal Walk just to the north.
You could also head to the nearby Bosley Reservoir and pick up the waterside path. View Full Details>>
Bossington Hill3 miles (4.5 km)Enjoy fabulous views of the Exmoor coastline on this bracing climb near Porlock. The area also includes attractive flora including bell heather, ling heather and western gorse. Look out for wildlife including buzzards, peregrine falcons, kestrels.
The walk starts from the car park at the end of Hill Road, just east of the village of Bossington. You then head north along public footpaths before picking up a section of the South West Coast Path to take you towards the hill summit. From here there are lovely views over the Bristol Channel to the Welsh coast.
An alternative route is to follow the coast path from the village of Bossington to Hurlstone Point. Then turn south to reach the hill.
You can easily extend the walk by exploring the Holnicote Estate and climbing to Selworthy Beacon. The beacon is located just to the east of Bossington Hill.
Also nearby are the settlements of Porlock and Porlock Weir. Porlock Weir is particularly lovely, with 17th century cottages and a delightful harbour. View Full Details>>
Boulsworth Hill7 miles (12 km)Climb to Lad Law, the 1,696ft (517m) summit of Boulsworth Hill on this challenging walk in the South Pennines. The walk starts in the historically fascinating village of Wycoller and makes use of the Bronte Way and the Pendle Way footpaths to take you to Boulsworth Dyke where you begin the serious climbing to the hill summit. The views are far reaching with the Lake District Peaks, the Peak District, Pendle Hill and Blackpool Tower all visible on a clear day. You then descend via Bedding Hill Moor and return to Wycoller on the same paths.
It's a fine walk with some wonderful moorland scenery and a nice waterside section along the Wycoller Beck at the start. The beck is crossed with ancient Clapper and Pack-horse bridges one of which is over 1,000 years old. You'll also pass the ruined Wycoller Hall thought to be the inspiration for 'Ferndean Manor' inCharlotte Bronte's novelJane Eyre.
If you would like to extend your walk you could head to the nearby Widdop Reservoir. View Full Details>>
Bowfell6 miles (10 km)Climb one of the most popular fells in the Lake District on this challenging walk. Bowfell is is in Alfred Wainwright's 'best half dozen' Lake District fells. The views from the summit are magnificent with every main fell group in the Lake District visible including the Helvellyn range, theLangdale Pikesacross Langdale and Scafell Piketowering above Eskdale.
If you'd like to continue your climbing you could head to the Langdale Pikes - the start point for this route is close by. View Full Details>>
Bredon Hill5 miles (7.5 km)Climb to the 299m (981ft) summit of this hill in the Cotswolds and enjoy fine views over the surrounding countryside. The walk starts from the Worcestershire village of Overbury and climbs to Bredon Hill on good footpaths, passing woodland and streams on the way. At the summit you will find the Iron Age Hill Fort of Kemerton Camp and a small stone tower known as Parsons Folly or Banbury Stone Tower. There's also Romanearthworks and several ancient standing stones.
The hill is also a nature reserve so there is a wide variety of flora and fauna to look out for. This includes wild thyme, common rock rose, pyramidal orchid and dwarf thistle. These attract butterflies such as marbled white, brown argus and dingy skipper.
Bredonhill is mentioned in a poem ofA. E. Housman's anthologyA Shropshire Lad: 'In summertime on Bredon, The bells they sound so clear, Round both the shires they ring them, In steeples far and near, A happy noise to hear.'
The whole of this circular walk is more suited for walkers as it uses some public footpaths but much of it uses bridleways which cyclists can also use.
The Wychavon Way long distance footpath passes close to the hill so you could pick this up to extend your walking. An alternative route to the hill would be to follow the Wychavon Way from the nearby village of Ashton under Hill. You could also climb to the hill from the village of Elmley Castle. Country lanes and footpaths will take you past Comberton Wood and Castle Hill to Bredon Hill. View Full Details>>
Brendon Hills5 miles (7.5 km)Explore the Brendon Hills range on this challenging walk in the Exmoor National Park. The hills are a less well known area of the county so provide an opportunity for a quieter walk in idyllic surroundings. The attractive landscape consists of streams, rivers, rolling hills and wooded valleys.
The walk starts from the village of Wheddon Cross near Cuttcombe. You then pick up the Coleridge Way and climb to Lype Hill, the highest point in the range at 1,388 feet (423m). From here you can enjoy lovely views over the attractive Somerset and Exmoor countryside. The route then passes Lype Common and Colly Hill before descending to the village of Luxborough where you can enjoy refreshments.
To continue your walking in the area you can climb the nearby Dunkery Beacon or pick up the Samaritans Way South West. There are also good woodland walking trails if you head north to Croydon Hill Iron Age hill fortfrom Churchtown.
If you continue east along the Coleridge Way you will come to Combe Sydenham Country Park where you will find 500 acres of woodland, parkland and gardens surrounding a Grade I listed 15th century manor house. View Full Details>>
Buachaille Etive Mor8 miles (13 km)Explore the stunning Buachaille Etive Mor ridge on this exhilarating walk in Fort William. Buachaille Etive Mor is a distinctive pyramid shaped mountainin Glen Etive. The stunning ridge contains four distinct peaks including Stob Dearg (1022m), Stob na Doire (1011m), Stob Coire Altruim (941m) and Stob na Broige (956m). This circular walk starts from the parking area by the A82 at Altnafeadh and ascends the four peaks in turn, before descending along the River Coupall. You'll enjoy stunning scenery with wonderful views over Rannoch Moor and Glen Etive. The ridge walk is challenging with some steep sections but you are rewarded with breathtaking views. Buachaille Etive Mor can be seen in the Bond film Skyfall, when James Bonddrives M away from Raoul Silva. View Full Details>>
Buckden Pike7 miles (12 km)This circular walk climbs to the 702 metres (2,303ft) summit of Buckden Pike in the Yorkshire Dales National Park. Buckden Pike is considered to be one of the finest climbs in Yorkshire with its splendid views over the beautiful Wharfedale and the Nidderdale AONB.
The walk starts in the parking area in the village of Buckden and follows a bridleway to the summit. From here there are wonderful views of Great Whernside, Yockenthwaite Moor and across the Yorkshire Dales. You then descend to Starbotton passing the war memorial to the Polish airmen who died when their Wellington Bomber crashed on Buckden Pike during a snowstorm in 1942. The descent follows the Walden Road with views of pretty becks and waterfalls on the way. At Starbotton you cross the River Wharfe and pick up the Dales Way for a lovely riverside section taking you back to Buckden. Look out for Kingfisher, Heron, and Dipper on this section of the walk.
To extend your walking in the area you could head south to the village of Kettlewell and climb to Great Whernside for more great views over Wharfedale. View Full Details>>
Bulbarrow Hill2 miles (4 km)This walk explores the Dorset Downs, visiting the Iron Age hillfort at Bulbarrow Hill. The area has an interesting history and offers fine views over the Blackmore Vale.
There's a car park just to the east of the hill where you can pick up the Wessex Ridgeway to take you across the hill to Rawlsbury Camp. The hill is the second highest in Dorset standing at a height of 274-metres (899 feet). The views from the summit stretch intoSomerset,WiltshireandDevon.
To extend your walk you could head north east along the Wessex Ridgeway to Ibberton Hill, Okeford Hill and Blandford Forest. Continue south west and you will come to Ball Hill.
Cyclists can reach the hill by following National Cycle Network route 253 from Milton Abbas or Okeford Fitzpaine. View Full Details>>
Burrow Mump5 miles (8 km)This walk climbs this small hill overlooking the village of Burrowbridge in Somerset. On top of the hill there is the striking 18th century ruined church of St Michael's. It's a short, steep climb to the hill summit from the car park but there are lovely views over the Somerset Levels towards Glastonbury Tor and the Rivers Parrett and Tone. This circular walk starts at the Burrow Mump car park and climbs to the ruined church before heading along the river to Samways Farm. Here you head into the countryside along the Burrow Drove and Broad Drove tracks. You continue to Pathe and Stathe where you pick up a trail along the river which leads back to Burrowbridge. There's lovely views across Southlake Moor which can be flooded in winter. This attracts large numbers of wildfowl including pochard, teal and tufted duck. Look out for Otters and newts along the River Parret.
The River Parret Trail runs through Burrowbridge so you can extend your walk by picking up this waterside, long distance trail. If you head south east you will come to Langport while walking north east will take you into Bridgwater. View Full Details>>
Butser Hill1 miles (1 km)Climb to the highest point on theSouth Downs on this walk near Petersfield.
There's a good sized car park off Limekiln Lane just to the west of the hill. From here it is a short climb to the 271 metres (889ft) high summit of the hill. At the top you can enjoy wonderful views over the South Downs to the Isle of Wight.
The area is also a nature reserve with woodland, lowland, chalk grassland habitats. Look out for variety of butterflies including Duke of Burgundy, Chalkhill Blue and Silver-Spotted Skipper.
Fans of the comedy Only Fools and Horses may remember a scene with Del Boy reluctantly taking off on a hang glider. This scene was filmed on the western slopes of Butser Hill.
The South Downs Way National Trail passes the car park so it's easy to extend your walk. Following it south will take you into Queen Elizabeth Country Park. Here you will find miles of woodland trails and some super mountain bike trails. You can also pick up the Staunton Way and Hangers Way long distance trails in the park. View Full Details>>
Cadair Berwyn5 miles (8 km)Climb to the highest point in theBerwyn range on this challenging walk in North East Wales. The walk starts from the car park at Tan-y-pistyll and takes you to the beautiful Pistyll Rhaeadr Waterfall. The falls are 240-foot (73m) high and regarded as one of the Seven Wonders of Wales. You'll pass through attractive woodland and along the rushing waters of the Afon (River) Rhaeadr on this section of the walk.
You then climb to Moel Sych the joint second highest summit on the Berwyn range. Here you will find a cairn and lovely views down to Llyn Lluncaws.
From Moel Sych you continue to the 832m (2,730ft) summit of Cadair Berwyn. The summit lies on the border betweenPowysandDenbighshire, and is the highest point in Denbighshire. The views in all directions are simply stunnning with Cheshire, the Brecon Beacons and Snowdonia all visible on a clear day.
From here you could continue to Cadair Bronwen but this route descends to the glacialLlyn Lluncaws and then through the beautiful Cwm Nant y Llyn valley before returning to the car park. It's a nice descent with the Nant y Llynstream and some gorgeous scenery to enjoy. There is a B&B and a cafe near the falls so you can refresh yourself after the walk. View Full Details>>
Cadair Idris5 miles (8 km)The climb to the 893m (2,930ft) summit of Cadair Idris is one of the most popular walks in the Snowdonia National Park. This route follows the Minffordd Path and begins near the car park at Minffordd and the glacialTal-y-llyn Lake. You begin with a lovely woodland section before ascending towards the stunning Llyn Cau. This beautiful lake is surrounded by huge cliffs and is a breathtaking sight, particularly when viewed from above. You continue around the lake towards Penygadair- the highest point on the mountain. From here there are magnificent views of the Barmouth estuary, the Cambrian Mountains,the Brecon Beacons, the Rhinogs and the rest of Snowdonia National Park. You continue east to Mynydd Moel and descend towards Moelfryn, crossing the Nant Cadairbefore returning to the car park through the woodland. View Full Details>>
Cadbury Castle1 miles (1.5 km)Climb to this Iron Agehillfort on Cadbury Hill on this short walk in Somerset. The hill is thought to be the site of King Arthur's Camelot and has a fascinating history. From the high points there are wonderful views over the surrounding Somerset countryside.
You can start the walk from the car park just off Chruch Lane to the east of the hill. You then pick up the footpath on Castle Lane to take you up and around the ramparts of the hill fort. It's a splendid spot with far reaching views over the beautiful woodland and countryside below.
The hill is on the Leland Trail long distance footpath so you have the option of starting your walk from the village of North Cadbury and heading south along the trail to visit the castle. You could also extend your walk by heading west through the countryside to Queen Camel.
You can visit the hill by bike by cycling along National Cycle Network route 266 from Castle Cary or along route 26 from Sherborne. View Full Details>>
Caer Caradoc9 miles (14 km)Climb to the 1500 ft (459 m) summit of this distinctive hill in the Shropshire Hills AONB. The walk starts at Church Stretton, near the train station, and takes you to the Caer Caradoc summit where you will find an ancient hill fort. There are fabulous views of The Wrekin, Long Mynd, Carding Mill Valley, Wenlock Edge, the hills of North Wales and the Brecon Beacons. The walk then descends towards Comley and continues to the pretty village of Cardington. From here you return to Church Stretton via Willstone Hill, passing Hope Bowdler Hill on the way.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then the beautiful Carding Mill Valley and Long Mynd are nearby. View Full Details>>
Caerphilly Mountain1 miles (1 km)Enjoy a climb to the summit of Caerphilly Mountain and a walk across Caerphilly Common on this circular route in South Wales.
You can park at the Caerphilly Mountain Snack Bar car park on Mountain Road to start your walk. From here you can pick up the tracks to take you to the 271 metres (889ft) summit where there are fabulous views over the town and Caerphilly Castle. There are a few different paths to choose from. Most of them are good wide trails though they can get muddy in winter. After your walk you can enjoy refreshments at the snack bar.
The Taff Ely Ridgeway Walk passes the common so you can pick up this long distance trail to continue your walk. The waymarked trail starts on the common and will take you to Garth Hill, the Ely Valley and the Taff Vale.
The Glamorgan Ridgeway Walk also passes the mountain. It's a long distance ridge top walk which takes you to Llantrisant forest and Margam Country Park.
The splendid 13th century Caerphilly Castle also has some nice footpaths around the itsnetwork of moats and dams. View Full Details>>
Cairn Gorm3 miles (5.5 km)This walk follows the signed 'Windy Ridge Path' from the Cairngorm Ski Centre car park to the summit of the mountain. At 1245metres (4084ft) Cairn Gorm is the sixth highest mountain in theUnited Kingdom. The route passes the Ptarmigan Restaurant, the highest restaurant in the UK. It is located at the Ptarmigan Train Station of the CairnGorm Mountain railway. It's just over half way from the summit so it's a great place to stop for refreshments and enjoy wonderful views of Loch Morlich, theRothiemurchus Forest, Ben Nevis and Ben Hope. You continue to the summit where you will find a cairn and a weather station building. The views of the surrounding area are truly wonderful.
You descend via the same path with the option of catching the funicularrailway back to the base at Ptarmigan.
The Ben Macdui and Coire an t-Sneachda walks start from the same car park so if you'd like to continue your walking in the area then these are good options. View Full Details>>
Caldy Hill2 miles (4 km)Explore 250 acres of woodland and heathland on this lovely walk on the Wirral Peninsula. You can also climb the 260ft high Caldy Hill for fabulous views over the River Dee, Hilbre Islandand theIrish Sea. On a clear day you can even see as far as Snowdoniaand the Lake District.
It's a great place for flora and fauna with pretty heather, willdfowers, bracken, silver birch and oak trees.
Less than an a mile to the east is Royden Park and Thurstaston Common. It's a great place to extend your walk with woodlands, meadows, heathland and two meres where you will find an abundance of birdlife.
Just to the west you can pick up the Wirral Way and follow it to the nearby Wirral Country Park. It's a great cycling and walking trail running on a disused railway line along the estuary of theRiver Dee. View Full Details>>
Cam Peak Dursley4 miles (6 km)Enjoy a circular walk across Cam Long Down to Cam Peak on this lovely walk in Dursley. The down is on a splendid section of the Cotswold Escarpment with marvellous views, wildflower rich limestone grassland and attractive woodland.
You can start the walk from the centre of Dursley and follow the Cotswold Way across the down. It climbs from the town to Cam Peak, reaching a height of over 700ft at the high points. From here there are really lovely views over the River Severn to the Forest of Dean, May Hill and the Welsh mountains.
The route takes you over Cam Long Down with the option of continuing a little further east and visiting Uley Bury. This long, flat-topped hill is an impressive multi-vallate, scarp-edgeIron Agehill fortdating from around 300 BC.
If you would prefer a shorter walk then you can start from the car park on the down.
It's easy to extend your walk by continuing along the Cotswold Way. If you follow it north east you can visit Coaley Peak for more great views.
Also nearby is the expansive Woodchester Park which includes a series of lakes and woodland trails. View Full Details>>
Captain Cook's Monument6 miles (10 km)Enjoy a walk from Great Ayton to this iconic landmark on Easby Moor. Captain Cook's Monument is an obelisk 60ft (18m)high in memory of the great British explorer. This walk starts in the village of Great Ayton and climbs to the monument through woodland and moorland. You then pick up the Cleveland Way to take you across Great Ayton Moor to the wonderful Roseberry Topping. This distinctive hill commands wonderful views across the Cleveland Plain towards the Pennine Hills. The route then descends from Roseberry Topping to Great Ayton and the finish point.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could climb Roseberry Topping on the National Trust walk or continue east along the Cleveland Way towards Guisborough Forest and Walkway. View Full Details>>
Carneddau6 miles (9 km)This walk explores the Carneddau mountain range in the Snowdonia National Park. You'll visit the peaks of View Full Details>>
Castle Crag3 miles (5 km)Castle Crag is the smallest hill included inAlfred Wainwright'sPictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells. It stands at 290m (950ft) in the beautiful Borrowdale area of the Lake District.
This walk begins at the pretty village of Grange and makes use of the Cumbria Way and the Allerdale Ramble to take you along the River Derwent before ascending Castle Crag. At the summit you will find a circularcairnof slate and a memorial to Borrowdale men killed inWorld War I. The views of Derwent Water and Borrowdale are truly wonderful.
The climb can also be started from nearby Rosthwaite.
If you wanted to continue your walk you could follow the Cumbria Way north to the beautiful Derwent Water and enjoy a lakeside stroll. Another popular fell is the nearby Catbells which gives faboulous views across Derwent Water. View Full Details>>
Castle Hill Huddersfield1 miles (1 km)Climb to this prominent landmark and scheduled ancient monument on this walk in Huddersfield. At the top of the hill you will find the grade IIlistedVictoria Tower. The tower is106 feet (32.3 m) high, making the hill over 1000 ft high. From the summit there are fantastic views over the town and the surrounding countryside of the Holme Valley.
You can start the walk from the car park located at the top of the hill or from the nearby Berry Brow Train Station, if you wish to visit by public transport. You can follow the Holme Valley Circular Walk from the station to the hill which is about a 1 mile climb to the east. Then you can follow a series of good surfaced footpaths around the hilltop. At the summit you will find the fascinating remains of an earlyIron Age Hillfort and a 12th centurymotte and baileycastle. It is also the site of adeserted medieval village.
To extend your walk follow the Holme Valley Circular Walk south to Farnley Tyas, via Molly Carr Wood and Royd House Wood. If you head west the path will take you through Berry Brow to Armitage Bridge. Here you can enjoy a walk along the River Holme through Mag Wood.
You can see the fantastic view from the elevated car park on the google street view link below! It shows the wonderful panoramic view of the Kirklees countryside. View Full Details>>
Catbells4 miles (6 km)Catbells is one of the most popular climbs in the Lake District. At 451 metres (1,480ft) it is not particularly high so attracts walkers of all abilities. Alfred Wainwright said of Catbells: 'It is one of the great favourites, a family fell where grandmothers and infants can climb the heights together, a place beloved. Its popularity is well deserved, its shapely topknott attracts the eye offering a steep but obviously simple scramble.' The fell is located on the western side of Derwent Water near to the popular town of Keswick.
The walk starts at the car park at Hawes End and climbs to Skelgil Bank and on to the summit on a good but steep path with minimal scrambling. From the summit there are fabulous views of Derwentwater,Bassenthwaite Lake, the Newlands Valley,Skiddawand Keswick to the north, while the view south has a fine vista ofBorrowdale. You descend towards Manesty where you pick up the Allerdale Ramble waymarked walking trail which will take you back to the finish point at the car park.
If you enjoy this climb you could try other popular nearby fells including Castle Crag and Latrigg. As stated the Allerdale Ramble walking trail runs past Catbells so this another option if you'd like to continue your walk. You could potentially follow it all the way to Keswick or head south into Borrowdale.
Just to the north is the village of Braithwaite where you can climb to Grisedale Pike. It's a popular and challenging climb with wonderful views to the Cumbrian coast, the Vale of Keswick, thePennines and the head of Derwentwater. On a very clear day you can even see the Belfast Hills and theSouthern Uplandsof Scotland. View Full Details>>
Cefn Bryn7 miles (12 km)This super walk in the Gower AONB takes you along an elevated sandstone ridge known as the 'backbone of Gower'. With a high point of 188m/617ft the walk is quite challenging but you are rewarded with wonderful views of the coastline and countryside of the Gower Peninsula.
The walk starts in the little village of Penmaen where there is parking at the National Trust car park. You then pick up the good footpath along the ridge with wonderful views back to Oxwich Bay. You continue towards Cefn Bryn Common and to the neolithicburial ground of Arthur's Stone. Its name comes from a legend that the ancient BritishKing Arthurthrew a large stone fromLlanelliwhich landed on this spot. Look out for Wild ponies and horses in this area. There is also the Broad Pool nature reserve consisting of a large pond which attracts wildlife such as dragonflys and wetland birds.
This walk descends back to Penmaen from Arthur's Stone but you could continue along the ridge to Ryer's Down and Llanmadocwhere you will find the splendid Whiteford Sands Nature Reserve. Here you will find woodland and sand dunes with nice coastal views to the lighthouse at Whiteford Point.
The Three Cliffs Bay Walk also starts from Penmaen. View Full Details>>
Chanctonbury Ring4 miles (6 km)Climb to this early Iron Age hill fort on the South Downs and enjoy wonderful views over the surrounding countryside and coast. The hill is also an important area for flora and fauna, including the protectedGreat Crested Newt which can be found in the dew pond on the hill.
Chanctonbury hill stands at a height of 238 metres (781ft) a few miles north of the coastal town of Worthing. You can start this circular walk from the car park on Washington Bostal, just off the A24. From here you pick up the South Downs Way and follow it east to the hill. After exploring the fort and taking in the views you descend to Chalkpit Wood where you follow the Wiston Bostal track towards Chanctonbury Ring Rd. Here you turn west and follow a bridleway through woodland passing Owlscroft Barn and Combe Holt, before returning to the car park.
A shorter alternative route is to start from the car park on Chanctonbury Ring Road and climb to the hill fort from there.
If you would like to extend your walk then we recommend you head south from the hill to the nearby Cissbury Ring. The historic site can be reached by following a bridleway south from Chalkpit Wood for about 2 miles. It is the second largest hill fort in England, dating back to around 250 BC.
You can also continue along the South Downs Way in either direction. Head west and you will come to Kithurst Hill, Springhead Hill and the village of Amberley. Head east and you will come to Bramber Castle on the River Adur.
Also nearby is the mysterious Clapham Wood near the village of Clapham. View Full Details>>
Cherhill White Horse2 miles (4 km)This circular walk takes you to Cherhill Down and the Lansdowne Monument in Wiltshire. The Cherhill White Horse dates from the 18th century and is the third oldest white horse in the country. The downs are a lovely place for a walk with splendid views across rolling valleys and hills. On a clear day you can see the Tetbury water tower.
The walk starts in the pretty village of Cherhill with its thatched cottages, village hall and pub. The route then makes use of the White Horse Trail to climb the downs where you will pass the 120ft high Lansdowne Monument. The impressive structure waserected in 1845 by the3rd Marquess of Lansdowneto commemorate his ancestorSir William Petty. You will also pass Oldbury Castle, a hill fort which dates from the bronze age. The walk then descends the hill to the A4 where you pick up a roadside path to lead you back to Cherhill village.
If you would like to extend your walk then you could continue along the White Horse Trail to the nearby Avebury Stones and Silbury Hill.
A few miles to the south east you can visit the Devizes White Horse at Roundway Hill. The hill is also the site of a 1643 Civil War battle and Oliver's Castle Iron Age Hillfort. View Full Details>>
Chinley Churn and Cracken Edge4 miles (6.5 km)Climb Chinley Churn and enjoy super views over the Peak District towards Kinder Scout on this circular walk.
The walk starts from Chinley train staion and takes you over Cracken Edge to Chinley Churn. There are lots of interesting geological features and fantastic views across the Peak District. You'll also pass two large railway viaducts and the old slate quarry at Cracken Edge. The walk continues north to Hills Farm where you have the option of heading east along the Pennine Bridleway to the 1,620ft (494m) summit of South Head where there are more fabulous views. You can return to the train station on the same path or an alternative to the west of Chinley Churn. View Full Details>>
Chipping Campden to Dover's Hill3 miles (5 km)This walk climbs to Dover's Hill from the lovely market town of Chipping Campden in the Cotswolds. You start off in the centre of Chipping Campden with its wonderful limestone terraced main street which dates from the 14th century to the 17th century. The 17th century market hall arches are a particularly iconic Cotswolds piece of architecture.
From Chipping Campden you pick up the Cotswold Way and follow it out of the town to Dover's Hill. The hill stands at a height of754 feet (230 metres) with splendid views over the surrounding Cotswolds countryside. On a clear day you can also see the Black Mountainsof South Wales and theLong Myndin Shropshire.
If you would like to continue your walking from Chipping Campden then you could follow the Monarch's Way to the nearby Hidcote Manor Garden.
You can also follow the path to the village of Ebrington where you can pick up the Ebrington and the Foxcote Estate circular walk. View Full Details>>
Christmas Common and Watlington Hill4 miles (6 km)This circular walk takes you around the lovely area of Christmas Common in the Chilterns.
The walk starts from the decent sized car park on Hill Road and takes you to Watlington Hill. Here you will find nice woodland paths and an abundance of wildlife. Red Kites are often seen gliding above while the hill is one of the last sanctuaries of the extremely rare silver spotted skipper butterfly. Also look out for rabbits on the attractive chalk grassland and redwings and fieldfares above. The hill commands great views of the Chilterns and the Oxfordshire Plain.
This walk makes use of the Swan's Way and the Oxfordshire Way to take you through some of the countryside and woodland surrounding Watlington Hill and the little village of Christmas Common. There is a nice pub in the village where you can enjoy refreshments at the end of the walk. View Full Details>>
Chrome Hill5 miles (7.5 km)This circular walk climbs the beautiful Chrome Hill in the UpperDovevalley area of the Peak District. You will visit the Chrome and Parkhouse HillsSSSI, an area with fascinating geology and limestone flora.
The walk starts from the little village of Earl Sterndale near Buxton. The village is a popular start point for walks because of its proximity to Dovedale, High Wheeldon Hill, Parkhouse Hill and Chrome Hill. There is also an old pub called the Quiet Woman where you can find refreshments at the end of your walk.
From Earl Sterndale you follow footpaths to Parkhouse Hill. The distinctive hill sits just to the north of the River Dove and stands at a height of 360 m (1,180 ft). You continue the ascent to the higher Chrome Hill which stands at 425 m (1394 ft). There are wonderful views over the Dove Valley towards the surrounding Peak District Hills.
The walk then descends to Tor Rock and then through Dowel Dale on a nice country lane. You then pick up another footpath to Glutton Grange and Glutton Dale, before returning to Earl Sterndale.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area then you could head to Buxton and explore Poole's Cavern and Buxton Country Park. The Dane Valley Way long distance walk also runs through Buxton. View Full Details>>
Cissbury Ring2 miles (3 km)Visit this historic hill fort in West Sussex and enjoy terrific views over the South Downs countryside on this circular walk. It's a very beautiful place with rolling hills, patches of woodland, wildlife-rich chalk grassland, wildflowers in the summer and a series of good footpaths and tracks to guide your around the area.
At 60 acres the fill fort is the second largest in England, dating back to around 250 BC. It also contains aNeolithicmine, one of the firstflint minesin Britain.
You can start the walk from the Storrington Rise car park which is less than a mile west of the hill. Then climb east towards the hill fort which stands at a height of around 600ft. The area is wonderful for flora and fauna in the summer months. Look out forbee orchids, field fleawort and round-headed rampion. Around the wildflowers you will see many different types of pretty butterfly. Keep your eyes peeled for chalkhill blues, dark-green fritillaries and marbled whites.
The area is located just north of Worthing so you could walk there from the town. You can follow a bridleway from the outskirts across Findon Valley to reach the site.
The Monarch's Way long distance footpath passes just to the north of the hill so you could pick this up to extend your walk. If you head east you could visit Bramber Castle and Upper Beeding on the River Adur. The The South Downs Way also passes close to the site.
There's lots of different bridleways you can pick up around the hill too. You can follow them across Canada Bottom and Tenants Hill for more great views over Worthing to the coast.
If you follow the paths north you will soon come to Chanctonbury Ring Hill Fort. The fort dates from the earlyIron Age and at a height of 238 metres (781ft) commands fine views of the area.
Also nearby is the mysterious Clapham Wood near the village of Clapham. View Full Details>>
Claife Heights6 miles (10 km)Claife Heights lies between Lake Windermere and Esthwaite Water in the Lake District. It's a splendid area for a walk with peaceful woodland, a number of tranquil tarns and wonderful views over the surrounding lakes. It's a special place as it has a distinctive feel to the rest of the lake district. It was also a place visited regularly by Beatrix Potter who lived at the nearby Hill Top.
This circular walk starts at the ferry landing on the western shore of Windermere. You can catch the ferry from Bowness on Windermere. The route then heads to Far Sawrey before climbing through woodland to High Blind How, the high point on Claife Heights at 270m (890ft). The walk then passes a series of delightful tarns including Wise Een Tarn and Moss Eccles tarn. Beatrix Potter owned Moss Eccles and donated it to the National Trust after her death. The tarn is stocked withwater liliesand fish, and surrounded bypretty rhododendrons. It's a particularly tranquil spot and one you'll want to stop at for a while. From the tarn the walk then descends on a good path to Far Sawrey and then on to the ferry.
An alternative route takes you to the National Trust view point of Claife Station along the western shore of Windermere. See the video below for details of this.
If you'd like to continue your walking in this area then you could visit the nearby Wray Castle or climb to Latterbarrow Hill. View Full Details>>
Clee Hills12 miles (19 km)Visit View Full Details>>
Cleeve Hill Circular5 miles (8 km)Climb the highest point in the Cotswolds on this splendid circular walk. The walk makes use of the Cotswold Way so is well defined and way-marked. It begins at the car park at the southern end of Cleeve Common before crossing the common and climbing up to the peak of Cleeve Hill which stands at 1,083ft (330m). From here there are marvellous views: to the west, overCheltenhamand theracecourse, over theRiver Severnand intoWales, and to the north overWinchcombe. View Full Details>>
Cley Hill1 miles (1.5 km)Climb this distinctive hill in Warminster and enjoy wonderful views over West Wiltshire and Somerset. The chalk downland of the hill is covered in wildflowers in the summer months.
There is a car park about half a mile south of the hill. From here you can pick up the footpath to the hill summit. The hill is located very close to Longleat Park so you can continue your walk here. There are miles of woodland trails, a series of ponds and the famous safari park. You could try the Shearwater Lake Walk which takes you along a 37 acre lake with access to the surrounding forest. A short walk from here is the wonderful Heaven's Gate with fascinating sculptures and wonderful views over Longleat.
The Mid-Wilts Way also crosses the hill so you could pick this up and head towards Upton Scudamore or into Longleat Forest. View Full Details>>
Clougha Pike5 miles (8 km)This circular walk takes you to Clougha Pike in the Forest of Bowland. The hill is located a few miles east of Lancaster, reaching a height of 413m (1,355ft). Clougha Pike commands wonderful views over Morecambe Bay, Snowdonia and the Lake District Fells.
You can park at the Rigg Lane car park (postcode below) just to the west of the hill. You then head towards Ottergear Bridge near Cragg Wood and the River Conder. The path then takes you towards Wisp Hill and Black Fell before coming to the Clougha Pike summit. Take a while to soak in the wonderful views. On a clear day you should be able to see the coast and beyond to the Isle of Man.
The route then descends back to the car park via Windy Clough with views of Trough Brook on the way.
An alternative, shorter route is to start from Rigg Farm and follow the Rowton Brook to the summit. The walk can be extended by continuing east along the path to Grit Fell and Ward's Stone, the highest hill in the Forest of Bowland. It can be quite a difficult walk though as it is a boggy area.
Cyclists can reach the hill on regional route 90 which runs through Quernmore. View Full Details>>
Cnicht3 miles (5.5 km)Climb to the 'MatterhornofWales' on this challenging walk from the village of Croesorin Gwynedd. Although several thousand metres lower, Cnicht has a similar appearance to the famous mountain of the Alps.
It's about a 2 mile walk from the village to the 689m (2,260ft) summit. It's generally a good stony path with some grassy sections as well. There is some scrambling required as you make your way to the top though. Cnicht is generally a very peaceful place with stunning views from the summit.
The walk begins in Croesorwhere there is a small car park. Then head north out of the village on a country lane before a stony track climbs through woodland. When you come out of the woodland section there are splendid views of the surrounding hills and mountains. The path continues in a north easterly direction, climbing steadily towards the summit.
You can turn it into a longer circular walk by descending to Cwm Croseor and returning along the Afon Croesor.
You can virtually climb to Cnicht using the google street view link below! View Full Details>>
Coaley Peak2 miles (4 km)This walk takes you to the Coaley Peak viewpoint from the village of Uley in the Cotswolds. The walk uses part of the Cotswold Way National Trail to take you through Coaley Wood to the viewpoint. At the peak there is a display showing all the landmarks you can see in the area.
The walk starts from the car park on Crawley Hill road next to Uley Bury. It's worth exploring the Iron Age hill forton Uley Hill before starting your climb to the peak. From here you head north through the woods for about 1.5 miles before reaching the viewpoint. Here you will find farmland and a wildflower meadow. There are also splendid views over the Severn Valeand theForest of Dean.
There is a good sized car park at the site if you prefer to visit directly. See the google street view link below for the view from there.
Near the hill you will find Woodchester Park which is a great place to extend your walk. The extensive park includes a series of lakes and woodland trails.
Just to the south west is the lovely Cam Peak near Dursley. You can cross Cam Long Down on the Cotswold Way with more great views to enjoy. View Full Details>>
Coire an t-Sneachda3 miles (5.5 km)Follow a good path to this stunning glacialcorrie in the Cairngorms. You start off from the Cairngorm Ski Centre car park and soon pick up the well maintained path to this spectacular corrie. As you climb you will see wonderful views of the Rothiemurchus Forest andLoch Morlich while crossing pretty streams on huge stepping stones. The surrounding glacial cliffs and huge boulders add to the dramatic nature of this stunning area. In the colder months you may see ice climbers attempting Magic Crack.
The climb to Cairn Gorm also starts from the same car park so you can continue your walking in the area on this path. View Full Details>>
Colley Hill2 miles (3 km)Climb to the 722ft (220m) summit of Colley Hill on this walk in the North Downs. Colley Hillis located just to the west of Reigate Hill. It's a satisfying climb with great views over Surrey to the South Downs.
You start off at the Wray Lane car park near Gatton Park and follow the North Downs Way west to the hill summit. You'll pass Reigate Fort, woodlands and grassland with pretty wildflowers in the summer. As you climb you can enjoy great views of Box Hill and Leith Hill. You'll also pass the interesting Inglis Memorial.
If you'd like to extend your walk then the Reigate Hill and Gatton Park Walk also starts from the Wray Lane car park. View Full Details>>
Combe Gibbet2 miles (3 km)This walk climbs to the interesting structure of Combe Gibbet and continues on to Inkpen Hill. The gibbet was erected in 1676 for the purpose of gibbeting the bodies of George Broomham and Dorothy Newman. The gibbet was placed high on Gallows Down as a detterent to other criminals. It's now a popular tourist destination with great views and a number of footpaths to follow through the surrounding countryside. The hill is also a popular climb for cyclists with a number of bridleways to follow across Inkpen and Walbury Hill.
This walk starts at the Inkpen Beacon car park and climbs to the gibbet along the Test Way long distance footpath. It's a good path which leads to the Inkpen long barrow and then up onto Inkpen Hill. From here there are wonderful views over the surrounding Berkshire countryside.
The walk can be extended to visit the nearby Walbury Hill. At 297m (974ft) Walbury Hill is the highest point in Berkshire and South East England. At the summit you can enjoy more great views over the county and explore the Iron Age Hill fort of Walbury Camp. If you continue along the Test Way you can visit Combe Wood. You could also pick up the Wayfarer's Walk and head south east along a wonderful ridge top path to the nearby Pilot Hill, the highest hill in Hampshire. View Full Details>>
Conic Hill2 miles (3.5 km)This popular climb to Conic Hill gives wonderful views over Loch Lomond. The hill is situated above Balmaha and can be reached by following a good, stepped path along the West Highland Way to the summit. The walk starts from the Balmaha car park/visitor centre and heads through the woodland of the Balmaha plantation before climbing the wooden steps and following grassy paths to Conic Hill. The views back over Loch Lomond towards the Arrochar Alps andBen Lomond are stunning. You can descend the same way or extend your walk by continuing along the West Highland Way to the Burn of Marr and Milton of Buchanan. This would turn the route into a longer circular walk. View Full Details>>
Constitution Hill Aberystwyth3 miles (5.5 km)This circular walk visits Constitution Hill and explores the area around the town of Aberystwyth in Ceredigion. It's a fantastic viewpoint with views over the town below, several of the Welsh Mountains and Cardigan Bay. At the hill summit you will find one of the world's largest camera obscuras, offering a bird's eye view of 1000 square miles of countryside and coast.
The hill is a short climb from the centre of the town. After reaching the summit you continue to the woodland of Glanmor Fach before heading along the golf course and descending back into the town. The footpaths are generally good and there are really nice views for most of the way. On a clear day you can see the Pembroke Coast to the south and Snowdonia to the north.
If you'd like to visit the hill without the climb then you could take the funicular electric cliff railway which is the longest in Britain.
The Abercyclefest also organises a downhill mountain bike race on the hill. See the video below for details! View Full Details>>
Coombe Hill5 miles (8 km)Climb to the 260m (850ft) summit of this lovely hill in the Chilterns. Coombe Hill is the highest viewpoint in the Chiltern Hills and commands wonderful views over Aylesbury Vale and the Cotswolds.
This circular walk starts in Wendover, near the train station, and follows the Ridgeway long distance trail to the summit. It's a nice, grassy footpath taking you over the delightful Bacombe Hill. There's a series of nice woodland paths and the area is also a nature reserve so look out for pretty wildflowers and over 20 species of butterfly. The summit is a special place with the iconic Coombe Hill Monument. It was erected in 1904 in memory of 148 men from Buckinghamshire who died during theSecond Boer War. As well as the great views over the Chilterns AONB you can also seeChequers, the country home of the Prime Minister from the summit.
From the summit you descend on more nice woodland paths to Dunsmore and then back into Wendover.
To extend your walking in the area you can pick up the Wendover Canal Arm of the Grand Union Canal. It starts in the town and heads to the nearby Tring Reservoirs and Bulbourne.
Also of interest is Wendover Woods where there's miles of good walking and cycling trails to be found. View Full Details>>
Cothelstone Hill2 miles (3.5 km)Enjoy heathland, woodland and wonderful views on this circular walk in the Quantocks. It's a lovely area with the groups of beech trees known as the Seven Sisters, bronze age burial mounds and the remains of a folly tower. You should also see several Exmoor Ponies around the hilltop and bluebells in the woodland in the spring.
The walk starts at the car park just to the east of the hill, and follows good footpaths to the summit. Here you can enjoy wonderful 360 degree views across the Quantocks towards the Severn Estuary. It's a fabulous spot on a nice clear day. The walk then descends through woodland and past Merridge Hill before returning to the car park.
The Samaritans Way South West and the Macmillan Way both cross the hill so you could pick these up to extend your walk. For example you could head north and visit Lydeard Hill and Wills Neck, the highest point in the Quantocks. The wonderful Fyne Court is just to the east and is also well worth visiting. View Full Details>>
Cown Edge Way17 miles (28 km)Visit the striking Cown Edge rocks on this walk through Greater Manchester and Derbyshire.
The path starts at Hazel Grove and heads east towards Marple where you can enjoy waterside stretches along the Macclesfield Canal and the Peak Forest Canal with views of the River Goyt. You then begin the ascent to Cown Edge, passing Hollywood End on the way. The path then takes you along Cown Edge Rocks and Coombe Edge Rocks where there are splendid views of the Peak District.
At Coombe Edge the route turns west towards Charlesworth before taking you over the River Etherow to Werneth Low and then onto the finish point at Gee Cross. View Full Details>>
Craig Cerrig-Gleisiad a Fan Frynych3 miles (5 km)Enjoy a walk through this spectacular glacial National Nature Reserve and climb to the summit of Fan Frynych on this challenging walk in the Brecon Beacons. The reserve can be easily accessed from a lay-by on the A470 from which the walk starts. Soon you will be exploring this wonderful natural amphitheatrewith imposing craggy cliffs created during the Ice Age, 20000 years ago. The reserve contains rare arctic-alpine plants such as purple saxifrage and mossy saxifrage. There is also an abundance of wildlife to look out for including Peregrine falcons, merlin, red kite and a variety of butterflies. The area also contains woodland, streams and an Iron Age Hillfort. From the 629m (2,064ft) summit of Fan Frynych there are splendid views over the national park.
The Brecon Beacons Way also passes the reserve so you could pick this up to continue your walk. View Full Details>>
Cranmore Tower1 miles (1.5 km)Visit the highest point on the Mendip Hills and enjoy a stroll through Cranmore Wood on this circular walk in Somerset. The tower is 45 metres (148ft) tall and dates from the 19th century. You can climb to a viewing platform where you can enjoy views over the Mendip Hills. The surrounding woods have some nice footpaths with beech trees and bluebells in the spring. Look out for badgers, rabbits and deer in this area. The tower has a tea room attached to it for refreshments after your walk.
You can park at the tower and explore the hill top from there. Alternatively you could follow the East Mendip Way from nearby Shepton Mallet to reach the tower. It's about a three mile walk through Chelynch and Waterlip.
To extend your walk from the tower you can pick up the East Mendip Way long distance path which crosses the hill. You could head west towards Shepton Mallet and visit the Charlton Viaduct and enjoy a walk along the River Sheppey to Kilver Court Gardens. Head east and you can visit Asham Wood. View Full Details>>
Crinkle Crags6 miles (10 km)Crinkle Crags stands at a height of 859m (2,818ft). Alfred Wainwright described it thus: 'Much too good to be missed ... this is a climb deserving of high priority'.
The walk starts at the car park near the Old Dungeon Ghyll Hotel in Great Langdale and heads to Stool End Farm on country lanes. You ascend towards Bowfell passing The Band, White Stones and Earing Crag. You then turn south passing the Three Tarns before you reach Crinkle Crags summit at 859m (2,818ft). There are fabulous views of Great Langdale, Eskdale, Dunnerdale, and the estuaries of the rivers Duddon andEskas they enter theIrish Sea. There is also a very good view ofScafell Pike, which is the parent peak of Crinkle Crags.
You then descend towards Great Knott and Oxendale with views of Oxendale Beck. Shortly after you rejoin the path to the car park and the finish point. View Full Details>>
Croft Ambrey2 miles (4 km)Climb to this Iron Age Hill Fort and enjoy great views over the Herefordshire countryside. The walk starts from the National Trust's Croft Castle car park. You can explore the beautiful parkland and gardens surrounding the castle before starting your climb to the fort. The route takes you through Croft Wood with its ancient woodland consisting of Spanish chestnut trees. At the top of the hill you can follow footpaths around the fort and enjoy wonderful views to the Welsh hills and mountains.
To extend your walk you can follow the Mortimer Trail north to Mortimer Forest and the splendid viewpoint at High Vinnalls. You can also further explore the 1500 acres of parkland and farmland on the Croft Castle estate. At the 19th century Fish Pool Valley you can enjoy pretty streams and Oak, Ash, Willow, Poplar and Evergreen woodland. View Full Details>>
Crook Peak6 miles (9 km)Climb to Crook Peak from the village of Compton Bishop on this fine walk in the Mendip Hills. The hill and the adjacent Wavering Down are a splendid place for a walk with wonderful views over the countryside to the coast. The route uses part of the West Mendip Way to take you across the downs where you will reach a height of nearly 700ft. On a clear day you can see all the way to Brean Down and Porthkerry on the Welsh coast.
The area is a designated geologicalandbiological Site of Special Scientific Interest run by the National Trust. It consists of a variety of interesting flora including ancient woodland, calcareous grasslandand the pretty Cheddar Pink flower.
You can start the walk from the village of Compton Bishop which is only about a mile from Crook Peak. After visiting the peak you head east across Wavering Down passing Compton Hill on the way. At King's Wood you turn south and descend to the village of Cross on some nice woodland trails. At Cross, you turn west and follow footpaths back to Compton Bishop.
You can also start the walk from the car park at King's Wood. It's located off Winscombe Hill Road at the eastern side of Wavering Down.
The eastern end of the walk also comes close to Axbridge where you can visit Cheddar Reservoir and the spectacular Cheddar Gorge. These are both good options if you wish to extend your walk. View Full Details>>
Cross Fell9 miles (15 km)This circular walk takes you to the highest peak in England outside of the Lake District. The walk begins in the village of Kirkland and takes you to the 893 metres (2,930ft) summit using bridleways and the Pennine Way.
The walk begins in the village of Kirlkland where parking is available on the village roads. You then follow footpaths to Cocklock Scar and Skirwith Fell, passing the Iron Well Spring on the way. At Skirwith Fell you turn right to the summit of Cross Fell, passing Cross Fell spring as you go. From the summit there are magnificent views of the Eden Valley, the Solway Firth, the Scottish mountains and the mountains of the Lake District. The route continues to Crowdundle Head where you have the option of returning to Kirkland or continuing along the Pennine Way to Little Dun Fell and Great Dunn Fell. From Crowdundle Head you descend to Kirkland Fell, Wildboar Scar, Grumply Hill and Tottle Hill, following the Littledale beck for a while. The route then bears right to return to Kirkland.
This is a challenging walk on mostly well defined paths. It's best attempted in fine weather as the area can be quite inhospitable in rough conditions.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the North Pennines AONB then you could head to the nearby Cow Green Reservoir and Cauldron Snout Waterfall for some waterside walking. View Full Details>>
Curbar Edge2 miles (3 km)This circular walk takes you along the spectacular Curbar Edge in the Peak District. From the elevated position on Curbar Edge there are magnificent views over the Eastern Moors of the Peak District. The area is also covered with interesting rock formations. Look out for red deer on the moors and birdlife such as the Ring Ouzel, in the air.
The walk starts from the Curbar Gap Car Park and soon picks up the footpath to take you along the gritsone escarpment of Curbar Edge. You'll pass unusual rock stacks and some woodland trails with fabulous views towards Big Moor and White Edge. It is a fairly easy walk without too much strenuous climbing.
If you would like to extend your walk then the wonderful, National Trust owned Longshaw Estate is a good option. It is located a couple of miles to the north and consists of miles of walking and cycling paths taking you through ancient woods, parkland and heather moorland.
Curbar Edge is located just a few miles south west of Sheffield. The nearby village of Calveris also well worth a visit with its historic cotton mill and the River Derwent. You could pick up the Derwent Valley Heritage Way here and enjoy a riverside walk.
A couple of miles to the south east you will find Birchen Edge. It's another geologically fascinating area with fine views over the Derwent Valley.
The walk can also be started from the nearby village of Baslow if you prefer. View Full Details>>
Cwm Idwal2 miles (4 km)Explore this hanging valley in Snowdonia and enjoy some of the most spectacular mountainous scenery in the country. In aRadio Times poll in 2005, Cwm Idwal was ranked the 7th greatest natural wonder in Britain.
This circular walk begins at the car park next to the western end of Lllyn Ogwen. You then pick up a footpath which ascends to the beautiful Llyn Idwal. It's a simply wonderful spot with the crystal clear lake and surrounding mountains forming a spectacular natural amphitheatre. The footpath runs along the edge of the lake to the Darwin Idwal Boulders and then to the Idwal Slabs. The slabs were used as a training ground for Mount Everest conqueror Edmund Hillary.
As you pass the lake you close in on the impressive headwall of Cwm Idwalknow as 'The Devil's Kitchen'. From here the route descends on the western side of Llyn Idwal to Llyn Ogwen and the finish point.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area then you could climb the challenging Tryfan mountain. The route starts from the eastern end of Llyn Ogwen. View Full Details>>
Danby Beacon6 miles (9.5 km)This circular walk from the village of Danby climbs to Danby Beacon for wonderful views over the Fryup dales. It follows quiet country lanes for most of route with splendid views of the heather covered moors and the River Esk. You'll also pass the excellent Moors National Park Centre with information, exhibitions and refreshments set in 13 acres of grounds on the banks of the River Esk. The walk passes the village of Houlsyke and the remains of the 14th century Danby Castle. Now a working farm the castle was once inhabited by Catherine Parr before she became the sixth wife ofHenry VIII.
The walk starts in centre of Danby where parking is available. Danby also has a train station near the route start.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area then you could head a few miles north to Scaling Dam where there is a delightful nature reserve and reservoir. View Full Details>>
Danebury Hill Fort1 miles (2 km)Climb to Danebury Hill Fort and Danebury Down on this short walk in Hampshire. After archeological excavations it is believed the Iron Age Fort dates back to between 500BC-100BC.
You can start your walk from the car park on Old Stockbridge Road about 1 mile east of the hill. From here you can pick up the footpath taking you up to the hill fort. The high point stands at 143m (469ft) providing wonderful views over the beautiful Test Valley. It's a great spot for a picnic in the summer when you'll see lots of people enjoying the views and walking their dogs.
The hill is great for wildlife. Look out for wild ponies and the Chalkhill Blue Butterfly. The fort also has a number of information boards where you can read all about the fascinating history of the area.
The fort is located near to Stockbridge and the village of Longstock. An alternative route would be to start your walk in Longstock and follow footpaths west to the hill. The Test Way also runs through Stockbridge and Longstock. You could extend your walk by picking up the riverside trail. Heading north east will take you to Chilbolton, Wherwell and Harewood Forest. Head south and you will come to King's Somborne and Horsebridge.
Cyclists can reach the fort by following National Cycle Network Route 246 from Andover to the Stockbridge area. View Full Details>>
Darwen Tower3 miles (5 km)This circular walk takes you up Darwen Hill to Jubilee Tower from Tockholes in Lancashire. The short climb to the tower gives great views over the surrounding moorland and reservoirs. The Bowland Fells and the mountains of Ingleborough and Whernside make a wonderful backdrop. On a clear day you can also see North Yorkshire,Morecambe Bay,Blackpool Tower,the Lake District and theIsle of Man.
The walk starts from the car park at Tockholes and follows good footpaths to the hill summit and the tower. You can then climb the 85 feet high tower on the staircase inside. The tower was built in the late 19th century to commemorate Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee.
The route descends along the Witton Weavers Way, passing the attractive Sunnyhurst Hey and Earnsdale Reservoirs before returning to the car park. At Earnsdale reservoir you will find the pretty Sunnyhurst Woods. You could extend the walk by exploring the 85 acres of woodland with its streams and wide variety of birdlife.
There's also nice footpaths around Roddlesworth Reservoir and the adjacent Rake Brook Reservoir. View Full Details>>
Deadwater Fell5 miles (8.5 km)Climb to the summit of Deadwater Fell in Kielder Forest and enjoy wonderful views over Northumberland and Scotland. The 1900 feet (571 metres)fell sits on the England-Scotland border about 2.5 miles north of Kielder. You can start the walk from Kielder Castle and follow footpaths through woodland and across open moorland to the hill summit. From here there are great views towards the Lake District, the Pentland Hills near Edinburgh and the North Sea coast.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area then you could try the Kielder Forest Lakeside Way and enjoy views across Kielder Water. View Full Details>>
Denbies Hillside2 miles (3 km)Explore this lovely area of the North Downs on this short circular walk. You can start the walk from the Denbies Hillside car park on Ranmore Common. There's waymarked trails, woodland paths and great views of Leith Hill and Dorking from the high points. There's also lots of interesting plants and wildlife to look out for. Several species of orchid grow on the hillside and there are a vairiety of butterflies to see in the summer months.
The North Downs Way passes over the hills so you can continue along the trail to extend your walk. You could follow the trail a couple of miles to the north east and visit the lovely Box Hill Country Park.
You can also further explore Ranmore Common by heading north from the car park. View Full Details>>
Derwent Edge8 miles (13 km)Climb to this wonderfulMillstone Gritescarpment and enjoy fabulous views back down to the numerous beautiful reservoirs below. It's a challenging circular walk climbing to a height of over 1700ft around Back Tor. You will be rewarded with stunning far reaching views over the Peak District.
The area is also full of interesting flora and fauna. Look out for rare plants such as common cottongrass, mountain strawberry and crowberry. Wildlife includes Eurasian golden plover, red grouse, ring ouzel and mountain hare.
The walk starts from the Fairholmes car park in between Ladybower Reservoir and Derwent Reservoir. Here you will find a great visitor centre which makes an excellent base for exploring the Derwent Valley.
The trail heads north along Derwent Reservoir towards the impressive Derwent Dam. Just after Abbey Bank you turn east and start the climb to Lost Lad Hill, crossing Little Howden Moor and Greystones Moss. At the summit of Lost Lad there's a toposcope showing the surrounding hills. You can also see up to Back Tor, the next destination on the walk. From here there are fabulous views over the reservoirs below, Stanage Edge and the Kinder Plateau.
From Back Tor you head south to Dovestone Tor and along the fantastic ridge path towards Derwent Edge. Around here there are some wonderful geological formations including the impresive Salt Cellar stone. It has a striking resemblance to a certain condiment holder! Even more impressive are the Wheel Stones (or Coach and Horses) which resemble a coach and horses on the horizon when viewed from the A57 road to the south.
Shortly after passing the Wheel Stones you turn west and descend back to Ladybower Reservoir. The final section takes you along the water back to the car park. The visitor centre has a good cafe where you can refresh yourself after your adventure.
To extend your walking in the area you can follow the waterside trail along Ladybower Reservoir and visit Lower Ladybower Reservoir.
If you are interested in more exhilarating climbs then look no further than Stanage Edge and Bamford Edge which are both nearby. For geology enthusiasts Alport Castles with its spectacular formation of rocks, is a must see. View Full Details>>
Devil's Pulpit3 miles (5 km)Climb to this wonderful viewpoint and enjoy views over the Wye Valley AONB on this circular walk in the Forest of Dean.
You can start the walk from the car park off the B4228 just north of Tidenham. You then head west through woodland before a moderate climb to the Devil's Pulpit. From here there are splendid views over Tintern Abbeyand the River Wye.
After taking in the views you pick up the Offa's Dyke Path to take you through Worgan's Wood to Tidenham Chase. You then follow Miss Grace's Lane back to the woods from the start of the route.
To extend the walk you could continue along the Offa's Dyke Path to Woodcroft and Chepstow in Wales. If you head north you can visit Caswell Wood and Oakhill Wood. Caswell Woods consist of a variety of interesting plants and trees with bare limestone rock which attract Kestrels. At Brockweir you can cross the river then follow it round to the fascinating Tintern Abbey ruins.
Heading south along the path will take you to the magnificent limestone cliffs at Wintour's Leap. The popular rock climbing spot is a couple of miles south of Tidenham near the village of Woodcroft. View Full Details>>
Ditchling Beacon5 miles (8 km)Climb to the highest point in East Sussexand enjoy wonderful views of the Wealdand the Downs on this circular walk. The lovely chalk grassland of the area is covered with a variety of flowers and plants during the summer months. Look out for marjoram,thymeand different types oforchid with butterflies such as the Chalkhill Blue flying around them.
The walk begins in the village of Ditchling just to the north of Ditchling Beacon and follows the Sussex Border Path to Burnhouse Bostall. You then pick up the South Downs Way and head to the beacon passing the Ditchling Beacon Nature Reserve on the way. You then descend to Ditchling following bridleways past Wick Farm and Stoneywish Country Park.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could head west along the The South Downs Way to the beautiful Devils Dyke.
The video below shows the area well from about 7:00 minutes on. View Full Details>>
Druids Temple9 miles (15 km)Visit this fascinatingreplica ofStonehenge, on this lovely walk from Masham.
The walk starts in the market town of Masham in theHarrogatedistrict ofNorth Yorkshire. The attractive town has some fine Georgian architecture and has some nice riverside footpaths along the River Ure and River Burn.
From the town you head west along the Ripon Rowel long distance trail. It will take you towards Micklebury Hill and across Fearby Moor, with nice views of the River Burn. The route then climbs on to the wooded area where you will find the Druids Temple structure. It was built in about 1820 byWilliam Danbyof nearbySwinton Park. The site includes a large stone table, a sheltered cave, and an altar stone. It became a follyof national reputation and is still an impressive sight. Situated at over 800ft there are great views over Wensleydale from the Druid's Plantation surrounding the folly.
After exploring the folly and the woodland, the walk then descends to High Knowle and the pretty Sole Beck before picking up the Ripon Rowel to take you back to Masham.
To extend the walk you could continue west and visit Leighton Reservoir and Roundhill Reservoir. There's some nice trails along the water and up into the surrounding moorland. Around here you can also pick up the Six Dales Trail. View Full Details>>
Duncryne Hill1 miles (1.5 km)This short climb takes you to the top of Duncryne hill near Gartocharn in the Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park. The hill is known as the 'Dumpling ' and stands at a modest height of 465 ft (142 m) giving wonderful views towards Loch Lomond. You can park by the roadside on Duncryne Road where you will find a gate and a good footpath leading through woodland to the hill. You follow the path to the hill summit where you will find a triangulation point. From here there are fabulous views over the Loch, its islands and the surrounding mountains of Ben Lomond and The Cobbler. View Full Details>>
Ebbor Gorge2 miles (2.5 km)This limestone gorge near Wookey Hole has some good walking trails to try. In the gorge you will find waymarked woodland trails and a variety of interesting plants and flowers. There's also pretty streams and lots of interesting rock formations. There is some climbing involved with some of the paths reaching a height of over 700ft. From these high points at the top of the gorge there are great views towards Glastonbury and the Somerset Levels.
The area is also a designated nature reserve so look out for wildlife including red deer and birds of prey. The site also attracts a large variety of butterflies including white-letter hairstreak, high brown fritillary and chalkhill blue. Flora includes bluebells, wood anemone, ancient woodland and various fungiandferns.
There is a good sized car park just off the Deerleap Road where you can start your walk. You could also follow the West Mendip Way from the nearby town of Wells to the site. It's about a two mile walk, passing Wookey Hole on the way.
The West Mendip Way passes through the area so you could pick this up to extend your walk. Heading north will take you to the village of Priddy through the countryside. A couple of miles beyond Priddy you will find Rodney Stoke and Draycott Sleights Nature Reserves where there are nice footpaths and lots of flora and fauna to look out for. View Full Details>>
Eccles Pike4 miles (6 km)This is a popular climb to Eccles Pike from Whaley Bridge in the Peak District. It's about a two mile walk from the train station/centre of Whaley Bridge. You follow footpaths through the countryside, passing Buxworth before climbing to the 370 metres (1,210ft) summit of Eccles Pike. From here there are fabulous views over the Peak District towards Windgather Rocks, Combs Edge, Combs Reservoir, Cat’s Tor and Shining Tor. At the summit you will find a topograph which shows all the sights you can see from the top. It's a lovely spot with the surrounding fields covered in various wildflowers in the summer months.
After descending from the summit you could return the same way or follow Eccles Road back to Whaley Bridge. This quiet country lane will take you past Hilltop and New Horwich.
If you would like to extend your walk then you could visit Toddbrook Reservoir or Chinley Churn. View Full Details>>
Eggardon Hill2 miles (3 km)Climb to this Iron Age hill fort and enjoy wonderful views over Marshwood Vale on this hilltop walk near Bridport.
The walk starts from the roadside parking area shown on the google street view link below. The footpath to the hill is just up the road from here. The hill fort is over 2500 years old and is rich in attractive plantlife. From the 252m (827ft) summit the views are wonderful with the English Channel visible on a clear day. It's a nice elevated path which takes you to the Bell Stone before returning the same way.
A local cycle route runs past Eggardon hill so you could follow this from nearby Powerstock to reach the hill. National Cycle Network Route 2 could also be followed from Bridport to Uploders before picking up the local route to Eggardon. It's a nice ride along a series of pretty country lanes.
You could also start the walk from Powerstock and follow good footpaths to the hill. View Full Details>>
Elidir Fawr4 miles (6 km)Climb to Elidir Fawr, the northernmost peak in theGlyderau on this challenging walk in Snowdonia. The walk takes you to the 924metre (3,031ft) summit from the village of Nant Peris at the bottom of the Llanberis Pass. It's only about a 2 mile climb, but quite steep.
The walk starts from the parking areas off the A4086 in Nant Peris. Cross the A4086 and then pick up a country lane heading north. A footpath then takes you the rest of the way to the summit, passing the Afon Dudodyn on the way. There are fabulous views over the peaks and reservoirs of the national park.
You can extend the walk by continuing a short way on to the pretty Marchlyn Mawr reservoir.
Following the path further will take you to Foel-Goch and then on to Y Garn. From the 947m (3,107ft) summit there are great views of Llyn Clyd and the Ogwen Valley.
Also nearby are the climbs to Glyder Fawr and Glyder Fach and Tryfan. View Full Details>>
Eston Nab3 miles (5 km)Climb to Eston Nab and Eston Beacon on this popular walk in North Yorkshire. The hill is located just to the east of Middlesbroughstanding at a height of 242 metres (794ft). From the summit there are splendid views towards the coast and across the North York Moors. The nab is historically significant as it includes Bronze Ageburial moundsand anIron Agehill fort. There is also the Eston Nab monument which dates from the early 19th century. It was built as a look-out post against invasion during the Napoleonic wars.
You can start your walk from Flatts Lane Country Park where there is a car park. From here you can pick up the Cleveland Way and follow it past Normanby Moor. Public footpaths then take you across Eston Moor to Eston Beacon and Eston Nab. Take a while to soak in the splendid views of the nearby Roseberry Topping and Urra Moor. From the nab you can descend on the same trail or on other paths running past Eston Bank.
There's a variety of habitats to enjoy on this varied walk. You will passlowland heath, grassland and woodland. Look out for wildife includinglapwing,curlew,green woodpecker, linnet and a wide variety of butterflies.
To extend your walk you could head south east along the Cleveland Way to Hutton Village and Hutton Lowcross Woods. Just beyond that is Roseberry Common and the splendid Roseberry Topping. It's a similar climb with great views of the Cleveland plain and the Pennines to enjoy. View Full Details>>
Fairfield Horseshoe10 miles (16 km)This is a challenging horseshoe shaped walk which takes you on a tour of some of the Lake District's most beautiful fells. The walk begins at Ambleside and heads towards Rydal Mount, the historic home of William Wordsworth. You climb to Heron Pike and then onto Great Rigg and Fairfield before returning to Ambleside via Dove Crag, High Pike and Low Pike. The views are spectacular with Rydal Water, Grasmere , Lake Windermere and Coniston Water all visible from the peaks.
This is an extremley challenging walk with an ascent of nearly three thousand feet. The paths are well defined however, care should be taken on the summit of Fairfield where in poor visibility there is the danger of steep drops to the north and west. View Full Details>>
Fan Gyhirych1 miles (2 km)This walk climbs to the 2379 feet (or 725 m) summit of Fan Gyhirych mountain in the Fforest Fawrsection of the Brecon Beacons National Park. There are splendid views over the surrounding area and of Cray Reservoir. The area is great for walkers as the entire hill is open country giving you the freedom to roam at will. The walk can be extended by continuing east to the nearby Fan Nedd. View Full Details>>
Fan Y Big and the Cribyn7 miles (12 km)This walk makes use of the Brecon Beacons Way to take you to Fan Y Big and Cribyn mountains from the Blaen y Glyn Waterfalls. You start off in the Blaen y Glyn car park and climb to the 719m (2,359ft) summit of Fan Y Big. This section passes along the spectacular Craig Fan Ddu with wonderful views towards Fan Y Big. From the Fan Y Big summit you continue west along Craig Cwm Cymwyn to the 795m (2,608ft) summit of Cribyn. You can extend the walk by continuing west to the summit of Pen Y Fan.
It's a spectacularly beautiful area with wide ranging views across the national park. Also look out for a wide variety of wildlife which includes red kites, sky larks, meadow pipits, peregrines and kestrels. View Full Details>>
Firle Beacon4 miles (6 km)This circular walk takes you to the splendid Firle Beacon in the South Downs. The route makes use of the The South Downs Way and various bridleways and country lanes to take you to the beacon from the pretty village of Firle.
The start point for the walk is the little village of Firle, located just a few miles from Lewes. You can enjoy a stroll through the village with its three pubs, old church, cricket green and little pond. You will also pass Firle Place and its surrounding grounds. The old manor house wasfirst built in the late 15th century by Sir John Gage. The route follows a bridleway around the grounds of the house before ascending to Firle Beacon. From the 712 feet (217 m) summit there are wonderful views over the Weald towards the south coast. The Firle Escarpmentis also aSite of Special Scientific Interest. The large area of chalkland is home to a variety of flora and fauna. Look out for the rare spider orchid Ophrys sphegodes and Exmoor Ponies as you make your way through this lovely area.
From the beacon summit you descend on the South Downs Way before picking up Firle Bostal country lane to take you back to the village. This lane is shown on the google street view link below.
It's easy to extend your walk by continuing west from the beacon along the South Downs Way to Beddingham Hill. Another option is to start the walk from the nearby village of Alfriston on the Cuckmere River. You can then follow the South Downs Way to the beacon via Bostal Hill.
You could also visit the lovely Mount Caburn Nature Reserve with its interesting plants, flowers and wildlife. View Full Details>>
Fleetwith Pike4 miles (6 km)This walk takes you to the 648metres (2,126feet) summit of this imposing fell in the Lake District. This circular walk starts at Gatesgarth in the Buttermere valleyand climbs steeply to the summit via Fleetwith Edge. From here there are wonderful views of the nearby Pillarand Great Gable fells and the lakes of Crummock Water, Loweswater and Buttermere. From the summit the route then descends to Bell Crags, passing Honistor Crag on the way. You continue to Wanscale Bottom, passing waterfalls and the pretty Wanscale Beck.
It's a steep and challenging climb to the summit but with an easier, more gradual descent. View Full Details>>
Foel Cwmcerwyn4 miles (6 km)Climb to the highest point in the Presili Hills on this challenging walk in Pembrokeshire. The hill stands at 1759 feet and commands wonderful views of the surrounding area.
The walk starts at the Bwlch Gwynt car park on the B4329 and follows a woodland trail through the northern end of the Pantmeanog Forest before picking up a mountain track to the Foel Cwmcerwyn summit. Here you will find a trig point, a number of cairns and fabulous views. You can also reach the hill from the little village ofRosebushin the south-west.
From the same car park you can also easily climb Foel Eryr. It's only about a half a mile climb from Bwlch Gwynt and makes a nice extension to the walk. Alternatively you could extend your walk by following the wonderful Preseli Hills Golden Road east. View Full Details>>
Foel Fras9 miles (15 km)Climb to the summit of Foel Fras on this challenging climb in theCarneddaumountain range in the Snowdonia National Park.
The walk starts from the town of LLanfairfechan and climbs towards Garreg Fawr along the North Wales Coast Path. You continue to Pen Bryn Du before reaching the 770m (2,526ft) of Drum. From Drum you climb to Foel Fras with wonderful views down towards the pretty Llyn Anafon below. The summit of Foel Fras stands at 942m (3,091ft) making it one of the Welsh 3000s (mountains over 3000ft high). From the high pint there are wonderful views over Carneddauand the rest of Snowdonia.
This route descends straight back to LLanfairfechan but you have other options if you'd like to extend your walk. You could continue south and climb to Carneddau Llewellyn, thesecond highest peakin Wales after Snowdon. This would take you past Garnedd Uchaf and Foel Grach. You could also descend back to Drum and head east to visit Pen Y Castell.
As an alternative you can start the walk from the beautiful Aber Falls by heading left from the car park along the North Wales Coast Path towards Garreg Fawr. Then follow this route from there. View Full Details>>
Fontmell and Melbury Downs5 miles (7.5 km)Enjoy a variety of beautiful flora and fauna in this nature reserve in Compton Abbas on the Dorset/Wiltshire border. The area is associated with the novels of Thomas Hardy and includes a climb to Melbury Hill for wonderful views over the area. Also look out for a variety of birds, butterflies, wildflowers and orchids in this delightful area.
The walk starts from the car park at the top of Spread Eagle Hill and follows footpaths to Compton Abbas. From here you climb past Compton Down before reaching the 863 feet summit of Melbury Hill. From here there are splendid views over Blackmore Vale, Vale of Wardour andShaftesbury. The walk then descends back to Compton Abbas before crossing Fontmell Down and returning to the car park.
At the end of your walk you can enjoy refreshments at the Compton Abbas Airfield Restaurant which is located just to the east of the car park.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area then you could head east to Win Green Hill. It is the highest point in the Cranborne Chase AONB and commands wonderful views over Shaftesbury, Salisbury Plain, Glastonbury Tor, the Mendips, the Quantocks, the Purbecks and the south coast. Also nearby is Melbury Down, Melbury Wood and Fontmell Wood.
If you head a few miles to the north west you could visit Duncliffe Wood where there is a nice climb to Duncliffe Hill, pretty bluebells in the spring and bridleways suitable for cycling. View Full Details>>
Fountains Fell8 miles (13 km)Climb to this prominent fell in the Yorkshire Dales and enjoy wonderful views over the surrounding hills and countryside. The circular walk starts from the beautiful Malham Tarn and climbs to the fell using a section of the Pennine Way National Trail. The route climbs to a height of 668 metres (2,192ft) with lovely views of the pretty Fountains Fell Tarn below. At the northern tip of the route you have the option of following the Pennine Way north west to Pen y ghent, one of the famous three peaks of Yorkshire.
To extend your walking in the area you can explore the Malham Tarn estate with its glacial lake and Tarn Moss Nature Reserve. There's also the climb to Gordale Scar, the fascinating Malham Cove and the beautiful Janet's Foss waterfall to visit on the estate.
The route of the Settle Loop also passes just to the south west of the fell. View Full Details>>
Friar's Crag1 miles (1.5 km)This short walk in Keswick visits a beautifulviewpoint overlooking Derwentwater. You can start the walk from the theatre car park just north of the crag. The route then passes along the lake before coming to the viewpoint. Here you can enjoy a rest on the bench and take in the stunning views across the lake and Derwent Isle. You will also pass the memorial to John Ruskin, the leading Englishart criticof theVictorian era. He has strong associations with Keswick and greatly admired the view from Friar's Crag.
After taking in the views you can return to the car park the same way or head around Strandshag Bay and return through Cockshott Wood. Just to the east of Cockshott Wood you can take a small detour and visit Castlehead Woods and the Castlehead viewpoint. It's worth visiting as you can enjoy wonderful views of the surrounding fells with a toposcopenaming them all.
If you would like to extend your walk further you could continue south and explore Great Wood before climbing to Walla Crag. Also nearby is the wonderful Castlerigg Stone Circle. View Full Details>>
Frodsham Hill3 miles (5 km)Climb to this prominent hill on the Mid-Cheshire Ridge on this lovely walk in Cheshire. Frodsham or Overton Hill stands at a height of 500 feet (152 metres) offering fabulous views over the Cheshire Plain and the Mersey estuary. The walk also visits Woodhouses Iron Age Hillfort which is protected as aScheduled Ancient Monument.
The walk starts at the Frodsham Hill car park just to the south of the hill on Bellemonte Road. From here you can pick up the North Cheshire Way to the Frodsham War Memorial. The sandstone obelisk is dedicated to the memory of the fallen in World Wars I and II and sits on Frodsham Hill. From here you pick up the Sandstone Trail and head south west along the ridge to Woodhouse Iron Age Hillfort. You then turn around and follow woodland trails back to the start point.
To extend your walking in the area you could head to the nearby Helsby Hill where there's another Iron Age Hillfort, more great views and nice woodland trails.
The Delamere Way also passes the hill. You can follow it south east to visit Delamere Forest Park and Blakemere Moss Lake. View Full Details>>
Garth Hill4 miles (6 km)This challenging walk takes you to the summit of Garth Hill near Cardiff. The hill is thought to be the inspiration for the fictional hill featured in the film 'The Englishman Who Went Up a Hill But Came Down a Mountain' starring Hugh Grant.
The walk begins in the village of Taff's Well and follows the Taff Ely Ridgeway Walk to the 307m (1,007ft) summit. Here you can enjoy fantastic views of Cardiff, the Bristol Channel and the Taff Valley. You will also find a number of burial sites dating from the early to middle Bronze Age, around 2000 BC. You descend on country lanes, crossing the River Taff and finishing back in Taff's Well. View Full Details>>
Garway Hill1 miles (1.5 km)Climb across Garway Common to the summit of Garway Hill on this walk in in south-westHerefordshire. There is a car park on the south eastern corner of the common where you can pick up the footpath to the hill. From the 1200ft (366m) summit there are splendid views over the Bristol Channel into Wales. On a clear day you can see Ross-on-Wye, May Hill, Skirrid Fawr, Sugarloaf Mountain and the Forest of Dean. After climbing the hill you can pick up any number of footpaths to explore the rest of Garway Common.
To extend your walking in the area you could head to nearby Grosmont and pick up the Three Castles Walk. Also nearby is Kentchurch Court. The grade I listed stately home has beautiful gardens and a deer park. View Full Details>>
Glaramara5 miles (8 km)This walk climbs to Glaramara, a substantial fell in the Borrowdale area of the Lake District.
Start the walk from the car park at Seatoller about 2.5 miles north of the fell. You then follow the Honister Pass east for a short distance before turning south along the path that will take you up to the fell. The path runs along Combe Gill to Thornthwaite Fell before passing Combe Head and arriving at the Glaramara summit. From here there are fantastic views of the Borrowdale Valley, Derwent Water and Skiddaw.
To extend your walking in the area you could head to the nearby Seathwaite car park and enjoy a circular walk to Styhead Tarn and Sprinkling Tarn. This includes a visit to the lovely Taylor Gill Force Waterfall.
The Allerdale Ramble also passes Seatoller so you could pick this up and explore the woodland and riverside paths along the River Derwent. View Full Details>>
Glastonbury Tor2 miles (2.6 km)This popular walk takes you from the ruins of Glastonbury Abbey to the summit of the iconic Glastonbury Tor.
You start off at the Grade I listed, Scheduled Ancient Monumentof Glastonbury Abbey. The abbey was originally founded in the 7th century and rebuilt in the 14th centuryafter a fire in 1184destroyed the buildings. The site is 36 acres and open to the public so its well worth exploring the area and marvelling at the fascinating architecture and history of the abbey before climbing the Tor.
From the abbey you head to the Tor summit on good footpaths passing Bushy Combe and Chalice Hill on the way. At the summit you will find the 15th century St Michael's Tower where you can enjoy marvellous views over Somerset, Dorset, Wiltshire, Wales and the nearby Polden Hills. You can also explore the apple orchards at the bottom of the Tor before returning to the abbey. View Full Details>>
Glyder Fawr and Glyder Fach5 miles (8 km)Explore the Glyderau mountain range on this spectacular walk in Snowdonia. The challenging walk visits the peaks of Glyder Fawr and Glyder Fach with incredible views towards Tryfan and over Llyn Ogwen and Llyn Idwal. You will also pass incredible rock formations in the form of the Cantilever Stone and Castell y Gwynt.
The walk starts at Llyn Ogwen by Idwal Cottage where parking is available. You then climb towards the pretty Llyn Bochlywd and then on to Bwlch Tryfan. You continue to the peak of Glyder Fach, the second highest of theGlyderau rangeand the sixth highest in Wales. There is a challenging section over the spectacular Bristly Ridge where some scrambling is required. It's a stunning ridge with truly awe inspiring views over Nant Ffrancon and Cwm Idwal. At the summit of Glyder Fach you will find the precariously positioned Cantilever Stone.
The climb then continues to the high point of the Glyderau range at the 1000m high Glyder Fawr. You will pass the magnificent Castell y Gwynt with its series of tall spiky rocks and enjoy views towards Snowdon on this section.
The descent back to Llyn Ogwen passes the two pretty lakes of Llyn y Cwn and Llyn Idwal with wonderful views over the Ogwen Valley.
If you'd like to continue your walking in this area then the Cwm Idwal and Tryfan walks are both nearby.
The climb to Elidir Fawr can also be tackled from the nearby Nant Peris at the bottom of the Llanberis Pass. View Full Details>>
Goatfell7 miles (10.5 km)Climb to the high point on the Isle of Arran and enjoy wonderful views over the surrounding area on this challenging walk.
The walk starts from the Cladach car park near Brodick Castle. You can reach Brodick by catching the ferry from Ardrossan Harbour. Trains run to Ardrossan Harbour from Glasgow and take about 45 minutes so the walk is quite accessible if you are coming without a car from the city.
From Brodick the route ascends on a good path through woodland and heather moorland. At the 874m (2,867ft) summit there are wide ranging views with the Arran peaks, the Mull of Kintyre, the Clyde Estuary and Ireland all visible on a clear day. You descend on the same path with great views of Brodick Bay as you go.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could explore the lovely Brodick Castle Country Park which has lots of good walking trails to try. View Full Details>>
Gog Magog Hills10 miles (16 km)This walk explores the Gog Magog Downs, a ridge of low chalk hills extending for several miles to the southeast of Cambridge.
You start your walk at the village of Staplefordfour miles to the south ofCambridge. The village became famous when it emerged thatBarack Obamawas a direct descendant of Thomas Blossom, who lived in Stapleford during the 16th century before emigrating to the United States.
You can pick up footpaths taking you from the village to Ash Grove, crossing the River Granta on the way. The walk then climbs to Copley Hill and Wandlebury Country Park where there is an Iron Age Hill Fort and a nature reserve. From the 74m (243ft) summit of Wandlebury Hill there are great views over the surrounding Cambrideshire countryside. View Full Details>>
Goodrich Castle and Coppet Hill6 miles (9 km)Explore the Goodrich Castle estate before climbing to Coppet Hill on this walk in Herefordshire. There's fascinating history, woodland trails and great views from the high points to enjoy.
You can start the walk from the Goodrich Castle car park. First explore the ruinousNormanmedievalcastle described by Wordsworth as the 'noblest ruin in Herefordshire'. Then follow the footpaths south through Goodrich before climbing Coppet Hill. The hill is also a nature reserve with woodland and lots of wildlife. Look out for butterflies,deer and a variety of birdlife. From the high points of the hill you can see the Brecon Beacons, the Clee Hillsand theMalvern Hills.
You can use the google street view link below to virtually explore part of the castle grounds and see the great views you get of the surrounding Herefordshire woodland and countryside.
To extend your walking in this lovely area you could pick up the Wye Valley Walk and enjoy a waterside walk along the River Wye. Follow the river south east and it will take you towards Welsh Bicknor, Lower Lydbrook and the Forest of Dean. Eventually you will come to Symonds Yat Rock where there are woodland trails and wonderful views over the Wye Valley.
The castle and hill are located a few miles south of Ross-on-Wye. You could follow the riverside path from the town as an alternative route. View Full Details>>
Gordale Scar4 miles (7 km)This walk climbs to the spectacular Gordale Scar in the Yorkshire Dales. You start in the pretty village of Malham and follow Gordale Lane and Gordale Beck to Gordale Scar. Here you will find twowaterfallsand overhanging limestone cliffs over 100 metres high. It's a truly stunning sight and well worth the climb from Malham. From Gordale Scar you continue the climb towards Seaty Hill where there are magnificent views of the Yorkshire Dales. The final section descends along country lanes to Malham Village.
If you'd like to extend your walking in the area then you could visit Malham Cove and the Malham Tarn Estate for more beautiful scenery. View Full Details>>
Gordon Way11 miles (18 km)Explore the Bennachie range in Aberdeenshire on this challenging walk. The route starts at the Bennachie Centre and heads west through Bennachie Forest, past Oxen Craig (the highest of the range) to Suie in the west. The views from the Bennachie ridge are stunning.
The walk is waymarked with a black and white logo. View Full Details>>
Grasmoor7 miles (10.5 km)This challenging circular walk climbs Grasmoor from the Buttermere Valley in the Lake District. The walk begins at the parking area at Lanthwaiteat the northern end of Crummock Water. You then climb to Whiteside fell, passing Whin Ben on the way. From the peak of Whiteside there are extensive views of West Cumberland, theSolway Firthand the hills ofScotland. The next section takes you from Whiteside to Hopegill Head along a spectacular ridge with wonderful views of Gasgale Gill. The peak of Hopegill Head is a special place with views of the Isle of Man, the Scottish Borderhills and the Helvellyn range. The walk continues to Sand Hill and the 852m (2,795ft) Grasmoor summit. From here there are splendid views over the surrounding fells and lakes. The walk then descends to the shores of Crummock Water, passing Lad Hows and Cinderdale Beck and common. The final section then takes you along the lake to the finish point back at the car park. View Full Details>>
Great Dun Fell11 miles (18 km)This walk takes you to the second-highest hill inthePennines, and makes use of Britain's highest road.
You start in the village of Dufton and follow the Pennine Way along Hurning Lane to Cosca Hill where you cross Great Rundale Beck. You continue the ascent, crossing Swindale Beck and passing a series of Cairns before arriving at Green Fell. Here you turn left and head to the summit of Great Dun Fell where you will find a alarge radar stationat the 848m (2,782ft) high point. There are also wonderful views across the Eden Valley, Cross Fell and North Pennines AONB.
From the summit you descend on Britain's highest road which takes you all the way to Knock Village, passing Green Castle and Knock Pike on the way. The final section follows a country lane from Knock to the finish point at Dufton.
The complete route below is designed for walkers but Great Dun is a very popular climb for cyclists as you can make use of the tarmac road that runs from Knock to the summit (it is essentially the descent section of this route). It is considered by many cyclists to be the greatest climb in Britain. Click here for the gpx file which just includes the tarmac road climb for cyclists. Also see the video below to see what you can expect!
If you're looking to continue your walking in the area then you could climb Cross Fell - the highest hill in the country, outside of the Lake District. Also nearby is the lovely Cow Green Reservoir and Cauldron Snout waterfall. You can also visit High Cup Nick waterfall set in a spectacular glacial valley. View Full Details>>
Great Gable5 miles (8 km)Great Gable is one of the most popular mountains in the Lake District for climbers. It's a steep ascent with rugged paths, a fair amount of scrambling and some of the most spectacular rock scenery in the Lake District.
The route starts at the car park at Seathwaite and ascends to Stockley Bridge following Grains Gill along the way. You continue to Greenhow Knott where you will pass the beautiful Taylor Gill Force waterfall which drops an impressive 140 feet into the Seathwaite Valley. The next section takes you along Styhead Gill to the lovely Styhead Tarn turning north west to the summit of Great Gable. The views from the peak are spectacular - you can see Ennerdale and Crummockdale, Pillar, Looking Stead, Haycock, Haystacks, High Crag, High Stile and Red Pike ridge.
The descent takes you through Great Gable's less famous (but still impressive) neighbour Green Gable, Mitchell Cove and Gillercomb. The final section runs along Sourmilk Gill to the finish point at Seathwaite car park. View Full Details>>
Great Shunner Fell8 miles (13 km)Climb to the highest point in Wensleydale on this popular walking route in the Yorkshire Dales National Park. The route begins at the village of Hardraw near to the lovely Hardraw Force waterfalls. It then follows the Pennine Way National Trail to the village of Thwaite. As such the path is well defined and way-marked.
There are fabulous views from the summit of Wensleydale to the south,Ribblesdaleto the south west andSwaledaleto the north, as well as views intoCumbriaandCounty Durham.
To extend your walking in this lovely area you could pick up the 10 mile Hawes Circular Walk which takes you on a tour of the rivers, becks, waterfalls and hills surrounding the town. View Full Details>>
Great Whernside4 miles (6.5 km)Climb to this prominent fell on this walk in North Yorkshire. Great Whernside forms the watershed between Wharfedale andNidderdale, and is on the boundary between the Yorkshire Dales National Park and Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. You can ascend to the 704m (2,310ft) summit from the village of Kettlewell. It's about a 2.5 mile climb and considered by many to be one of the best in the Yorkshire Dales. From the summit there are wonderful views of Pen y ghent, Ingleborough, Whernside, Pendle Hill and the Lake Distirct Mountains.
This route climbs to the summit directly from Kettlewell, following a footpath to Hag Dike and then on to the summit. You can turn it into a longer circular route by continuing north from the summit to Blackfell Top and Black Dike and then descending to Starbotton Road.
Kettlewell is a pretty little village with a car park where you can start the walk. After your walk there's good pubs and cafes where you can refresh yourself after your exercise.
There's lots of good options for extending your walking in the Kettlewell area. The Dales Way runs through the village so you could pick up the long distance path and head south to the market town of Grassington. Here you can enjoy riverside paths along the River Wharfe and a visit to the pretty Linton Falls.
Just to the north is the village of Buckden where you can climb to Buckden Pike. View Full Details>>
Grindslow Knoll5 miles (8 km)This challenging circular walk visits Grindslow Knoll in Edale in the Peak District. It's a beautiful area with interesting rock formations and wonderful sweeping views over the Peak District.
The walk starts from the pretty village of Edale which can be reached by train from Manchester or Sheffield. You then ascend to the Nab where there are splendid views of the Hope Valley. You continue to Ringing Roger where you will find a fascinating formation of weathered rocks and another fabulous viewpoint. The route continues along the spectacular Kinder Plateau, passing Nether Tor and Upper Tor before reaching Grindsbrook Clough. There is a popular alternative footpath here which runs along the Grindsbrook Clough back to Edale. It's a lovely waterside section along the Grinds Brook with pretty waterfalls along the way. This route, however continues to the summit of Grindslow Knoll, where there are great views of the Kinder Plateau, the Hope Valley and the Great Ridge. From here, the walk descends back to Edale where you can enjoy refreshments at the Old Nags Head pub. The pub is famous for being the start of the Pennine Way long distance walk. View Full Details>>
Grisedale Pike7 miles (11.5 km)Climb to this striking fell on this challenging walk near Keswick. The circular walk climbs to the summit of Grisedale Pike before visiting Hopegill Head and Sand Hill. It's a challenging walk but the path is mostly well defined.
Start your walk from the car park on Whinlatter Pass just to the west of the village of Braithwaite. From here you can directly pick up the Grisedale Pike Path heading south west. The popular path climbs to the summit which stands at 791m (2593feet). From here there are wonderful views to the Cumbrian coast, the Vale of Keswick, thePennines and the head of Derwentwater. On a very clear day you can even see the Belfast Hills and theSouthern Uplandsof Scotland.
The route then continues south west to Hopegill Head which stands at a height of 770m (2,530ft). The head includes the 130 metre (417ft) high cliff of Hobcarton Crag, which drops precipitously to Hobcarton Gill on the fell's north east side.From the summit the TheIsle of Manis seen on clear days, as are theScottish Borderhills. To the east you can clearly see the Helvellyn range.
From Hopegill Head the walk descends to Sand Hill and Coledale Hause, before turning east towards the Force Crag Mines. The National Trust now own the area which was an important part of the Cumbrian mining industry. For over 200 years men worked the isolated spot digging for lead in the early years and then later barites and zinc.
The final section follows the Coledale Beck back to Braithwaite.
The village is located near to several other walking atttractions so there is great scope for extending your walk. Just to the north is the splendid Whinlatter Forest Park where there are miles of great walking paths and mountain bike trails. Just to the east you can pick up the Cumbria Way long distance trail and enjoy a walk along Derwent Water and a climb to Catbells. View Full Details>>
Gummers How1 miles (2 km)Enjoy wonderful views over Lake Windermere on this short climb to Gummers How in the Lake District National Park. Gummers How is a fairly small hill at the southern end of Lake Windermere, near to Fell Foot Country Park. It stands at a height of 321m (1,053ft) and can be easily climbed from a parking area near Fell Foot Brow or you could go for a longer climb from Fell Foot Country Park itself. It's a lovely footpath with terrific views over Windermere, Lakeside, Newby Bridge and the coast. There's also a number of other trails which you can use to explore the area around the hill.
If you'd like to extend your walk you could pick up the Windermere Way which runs past the hill. View Full Details>>
Hambledon Hill2 miles (4 km)Climb Hambledon Hill and enjoy far reaching views over the Cranborne Chase AONB on this walk near Child Okeford in Dorset. On the hill you will find one of the country's best preserved Iron Age hill forts. The area is also a National Nature Reserve so there is an abundance of interesting flora and fauna to look out for. Plants include pyramidal orchidandwild thyme while butterfly species includedingy skipper,grizzled skipper,chalkhill blue andadonis blue. From the 192m (630ft) summit there are fabulous views over rhe Blackmore Vale, the river Stour, Wiltshire and Somerset.
This circular walk starts from the village of Child Okeford and follows country lanes and the Stour Valley Way to the hill summit. You then descend back to the village via Fernhayes Copse.
The Stour Valley Way and the Wessex Ridgeway both cross the hill so you could pick up either of the long distance trails to extend your walk. One option would be to continue south east to Hod Hill for more great views. View Full Details>>
Hambleton Hills20 miles (32 km)This walk explores the Hambleton Hills range on the western edge of the North York Moors. You'll visit the highest points on the hills with splendid views over the Vale of Mowbray, the River Rye Valley and the Vale of York. The route makes use of the Cleveland Way national trail for the duration of the walk.
Start your walk at the Kilburn White Horse car park and then head north past the iconic hill figure to the splendid Sutton Bank passing Roulston Scar on the way. The hill at Sutton Bank is the site of one of the most important prehistoric monuments in the region, anIron Age hill fort dating from about 400BC.
You continue past Gormire Lake and Hambleton Down before skirting the eastern edge of Boltby Forest. From here you head between Kepwick Moor and Arden Great Moor before coming to Black Hambleton which rises to a height of 1,308 feet (400 m). Take a while to enjoy the fabulous views over the surrounding moorland and woodland before returning on the same footpath.
The video below shows an alternative circular route around Black Hambleton with nice views of Kepwick Moor.
If you continue for a few miles north from Black Hambleton you will come to Osmorthley where you can pick up the Lyke Wake Walk. View Full Details>>
Haresfield Beacon5 miles (7.5 km)Enjoy woodland trails and wonderful views over the Severn Vale and the Cotswolds on this circular walk near Stroud. There are miles of walking and cycling trails on which to explore the large estate. On the way you will pass wildflower meadows, an Iron Age hill fort and the Bronze Age Long Barrow of Haresfield Beacon.
This walk starts at the car park and follows the Cotswold Way National Trail through Standish Wood. You pass the Long Barrow and Standish Quarry before heading through the countryside to Oxlynch. The path then passes Vinegar Hill and Ring Hill before reaching the topograph where you can enjoy splendid views. From the topograph it is a short walk back to the car park and the finish point.
The area is superb for interesting flora and fauna. Look out for bluebells in Standish woods and orchids and butterflies in the limestone grasslands. You may also see buzzardsand kestrels from the viewpoints.
The whole of this route is for walkers but much of it is suitable for mountain bikers too.
If you would like to continue your walking in this beautiful area then you could head south of Stroud and visit Rodborough Common and Woodchester Park for more great walking trails. You could also pick the Cotswold Canals Walk and enjoy waterside walking along the Stroudwater canal through Stroud. View Full Details>>
Hartside Pike2 miles (3.5 km)Climb this hill in Greater Manchester for great views over Ashton-under-Lyne,MossleyandOldham. At the summit you will find the 19th century Hartshead Pike Tower, a Grade IIListed building. From the 267m (876ft) summit you can enjoy views over the Pennines.
The walk starts near Mossley train station and climbs past Luzley Brows and Luzley Hall to Mossley Cross. You continue to Hartside Pike before descending back to the town via Broad Carr.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area then you could pick up the Oldham Way which runs past Hartside Pike. You could also pick up the Tame Valley Way and enjoy a walk along the River Tame through Mossley. You can also pick up the Huddersfield Narrow Canal and head across the Pennines and the Peak District towards Huddersfield. View Full Details>>
Hay Bluff1 miles (1.5 km)This is a popular climb to Hay Bluff hill in the Black Mountains. The hill straddles the border of Wales and England. Most of the area lies within Powys with the eastern flanks in Herefordshire. From the summit there are wonderful views over the Wye Valleyand the Welsh Mountains.
This walk starts from the Hay Bluff car park located just half a mile north west of the hill. However, you could also start the walk from Hay-on-Wye. Just follow the Offa's Dyke Path south from the town centre for about three miles and you will reach the hill. The path passes Cusop and Tack Wood before arriving at the car park and Stone Circle at the foot of the climb.
The route to the 677m (2,221ft) passes Ffynnon y Parc on a good path. You can further explore the area as the entire hill is designated as open country so walkers have thefreedom to roamat will.
You can extend your walk by continuing south along the Offa's Dyke Path to the nearby Black Mountain South Top and the Hatterrall Ridge. Also nearby is a similar short climb to Lord Hereford's Knob (Twmpa). View Full Details>>
Haystacks5 miles (7.5 km)Although not one of the highest of the Lake District fells at (597m, 1,958ft), Haystacks was one of Alfred Wainright's favourites. So much so that he chose to have his ashes scattered near the summit.
The walk begins at the car park at the south eastern end of Buttermere and starts by crossing Peggy's Bridge. You then cross Buttermere Fell, ascending to Scarth Gap and then to the summit. The view is magnificent with Gable Crag on Great Gable and the western panorama ofEnnerdale WaterandHigh Crag.Crummock WaterandButtermereare also visible.
The walk then heads past the lovely Innominate Tarn, a popular beauty spot with an indented rocky shore and a line of tiny islets. Shortly after you come to Blackbeck Tarn, a long slender pool which overflows through a cleft in the crags. You continue the descent through Warnscale Bottom with views of Warnscale Beck and a series of pretty waterfalls to enjoy.
If you'd like to continue your walking then a stroll around the nearby Ennerdale Forest and Buttermere Lake are always enjoyable. View Full Details>>
Hedgehope Hill6 miles (9 km)Climb to the 714 metres (2,343ft) summit of Hedgehope Hill in the Cheviots on this challenging walk. The walk begins at the parking area at Langleeford by the Harthope Burn. You then ascend towards Housey Crags and Long Crags and onto the summit where there are fabulous views towards the coast and Lindisfarne Castle. You can descend the same way or head towards Harthope Linn waterfall where you can follow the Harthope Burn back to Langleeford.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could climb the The Cheviot and Windy Gyle or pick up the Pennine Way. View Full Details>>
Helm Crag4 miles (6 km)Enjoy a walk to the summit of this distinctive fell in the Lake District. Alfred Wainwright said of Helm Crag: 'The virtues of Helm Crag have not been lauded enough. It gives an exhilarating little climb, a brief essay in real mountaineering, and, in a region where all is beautiful, it makes a notable contribution to the natural charms and attractions of Grasmere'. The ascent of Helm Crag is popular with walkers as it begins from the lovely town of Grasmere and is an easy/moderate climb.
The walk begins at the centre of Grasmere and follows the Easedale Road to Lancrigg, passing Easedale Beck on the way. You then follow footpaths to the summit of Helm Crag, passing White Crag on the way. The summit has wonderful views over Grasmere and towards the Helvellyn range. You will also see two rocky outcrops known as The Lamb & Lion and the striking 'Howitzer' which is the high point on Helm Crag. From the summit you soon reach Helmside where you descend back to Grasmere on country lanes. View Full Details>>
Helman Tor2 miles (3.5 km)This circular walk climbs to Helman Tor and then visits the adjacent Breney Common Nature Reserve in Bodmin.
You can park at the Helman Tor car park just south of the hill to start your walk. It's a short climb from here to the rocky outcrop which stands at a height of 209m (686ft). From here there are fabulous views over the surrounding Cornish coutntryside.
After descending from the tor the route then follows the Saints Way long distance trail around Breney Common. The reserve covers over 500 acres with heathland, grassland, wetland, woodland and ponds. It's great for widlife with grazing ponies and the rare Orange Tip butterfly to look out for. Various wildfowl can be seen on the open water too.
To extend your walking in the area you could visit the nearby Lanhydrock estate where there are miles of cycling and walking trails through woodland and parkland.
You could also continue south along the Saints Way and visit the town of Lostwithiel. View Full Details>>
Helsby Hill1 miles (2 km)Enjoy a climb to Helsby Hill Fort on this short circular walk in Cheshire. The hill is one of the notable landmarks of the area, standing over 450ft above the village of Helsby below. From the summit there are splendid views over the Mersey Estuary, the city of Liverpool and into Wales.
You can start your walk from the Helsby Quarry car park off Alvanley Road, about 1 mile to the south of the hill summit. Then head north, crossing the road before picking up the woodland trails towards the hill top. Here you pick up a section of the North Cheshire Way to take you to the edge of the woodland, before turning around and picking up the Middle Walk trail to take you back down the hill.
Several long distance trails pass Helsby Hill so you can pick any of these up to extend your walk. For example you could follow the Longster Trail south to Harmer's Wood and then on to the pretty Manly Mere where there is an adventure trail to try.
The Sandstone Trail runs just to the east of Helsby. On this trail you can climb to the nearby Woodhouses Hill Fort and then on to Frodsham Hill near Overton. Here you can also link up with the Delamere Way and follow it south east to the expansive Delamere Forest Park.
The Longster Trail starts on Helsby Hill so this is another good option. The long distance path runs from Helsby to Chester via the villages of Great Barrow and Guilden Sutton. View Full Details>>
Helvellyn4 miles (6.5 km)Helvellyn is the third highest mountain in England at 950m (3,120ft). It is situated in the Lake District National Park between the lakes ofThirlmere Reservoir and Ullswater. This route starts at the parking lot at Thirlmere Reservoir and takes a direct, short route to the summit via Helvellyn Gill and Browncove Crags. It's a steep ascent but the path is well defined for most of the route so there isn't much scrambling. The views from the summit are spectacular. On a clear day you can see the Solway Firthand hills of south-west Scotland to the north-west,Cheviotand thePennine Hillsto the north-east,Morecambe Bay, Blackpool and the coast of North Wales to the south, and the Irish Sea to the west.
Thrill seekers can take an alternative route from Glenridding via Striding Edge - an exposed knife edge ridgewhich is not for the faint hearted. See the video bellow for details. View Full Details>>
Hergest Ridge4 miles (6.5 km)Cross the Hergest Ridge on this splendid walk on the England Wales border. The ridge runs between Kington in Herefordshire to the little village of Gladestry in Powys, Wales. It's an exhilirating and beautiful way to cross the border between the two countries. The route runs for about 4 miles along the Offa's Dyke Path reaching a height of 426m (1,398ft). There are fabulous panoramic views of the Welsh Hills and English countryside as you make your way across the ridge. The beautiful area inspired the 1974 album 'Hergest Ridge' by the English musicianMike Oldfield.
You can start the walk in the centre of Kington, picking up the trail on Ridgebourne Road and following it west up to the ridge. The route then passes Yeld Wood and Hanter Hill before descending into Gladestry where you can enjoy refreshments. The route also passes adisusedVictoriancircular country racecourse, popular between 1825 and 1846. You can still see the markings about half way along the ridge.
To extend your walk you can continue along the path towards Newchurch. The Mortimer Trail also passes through Kington so you can also pick up this path and explore the Herefordshire countryside north of the town. View Full Details>>
High Cup Nick9 miles (14 km)This spectacular glacial valley is one of the major highlights in the North Pennines AONB. The walk begins at the village of Dufton in the Eden Valley and begins by following the Pennine Way to Dod Hill and Peeping Hill. You continue your ascent to High Cup Nick where there is a waterfall and great views of the u-shaped glacial valley, the Eden Valley, Dufton Pike and Murton Pike.
The walk then descends through High Cup Gill where you will pass boulder fields on your way to High Cup Gill Beck. You continue along the beck through Middletongue Crag to Harbour Flatt where you join a country lane, taking you back to Dufton.
This is a special place with some spectacular geological wonders to enjoy. It is quite a steep and challenging climb but the footpaths are generally good for most of the walk.
An alternative route starts from Cow Green Reservoir, approaching High Cup from the east and following the Pennine Way to the summit.
If you would like to continue your walk you could head to the nearby Cow Green Reservoir and visit the wonderful Caulrdon Snout waterfall. You could also head to Cross Fell for more wonderful views of the area. View Full Details>>
High Stile7 miles (12 km)This walk climbs to the summit of High Stile in the Lake District. The walk follows the High Stile Ridge taking in theButtermere fells of Red Pike, High Stile andHigh Crag. It's a challenging walk with a steep ascent and descent, but you are rewarded with fabulous views over the surrounding lakes and the North Western Fells.
The walk starts in Buttermere, passing the lake before climbing Red Pike via the pretty Bleaberry Tarn. From the summit of Red Pike there are wonderful views over a number of lakes including Derwentwater,Buttermere,Crummock Water,Ennerdale WaterandLoweswater. The route then climbs to the summit of High Stile, passing Chapel Crags. The summit is 807metres (2,648ft) high and has two main cairns side by side. The walk then continues to the 744m (2,441ft) High Crag. From here there are views ofGreat Gable and theScafells withSkiddawand theHelvellyn range in the distance. From High Crag you descend to Scarth Gap and then to the shores of Buttermere via Buttermere Fell. The final waterside section takes you along Buttermere Lake to the finish point at Buttermere Village. View Full Details>>
High Street from Haweswater6 miles (9 km)Climb to the highest point in thefar eastern section of the Lake District on this challenging circular walk. You can park at the Haweswater car park at Mardale Head at the southern end of the water to start your walk. You then pick up the footpath heading south west towards Small Water climbing along Mardale Beck. The path passes around Small Water to Nan Bield Pass before climbing to Mardale Ill Bell. At Nan Bield Pass you have the option of taking a detour and visiting Harter Fell.
From Mardale Ill Bell you climb around Blea Water to the 828metres (2,718ft) summit of High Street. The views are magnificent with the Pennines, the Helvellyn rangeand theSouthern Fells all coming into view. The route then descends to Long Stile and Rough Crag with wonderful views back down to Haweswater as you go.
As an alternative you can head to Bowderthwaite Bridge where you can pick up a section of Wainwright's Coast to Coast long distance footpath. This will take you west up to Kidsty Howes and Kidsty Pike before turning south to reach the summit of High Street.
If you'd like to continue your walk you can pick up the footpath around Haweswater. The footpath along the western side of the lake is particularly lovely with areas of woodland, the pretty Measand Beck and The Forces waterfalls to enjoy. View Full Details>>
High Tor Matlock1 miles (2 km)This short climb takes you to High Tor hill between Matlock and Matlock Bath.The impressive limestone crag is just over a mile from the town centre and the train station. If you follow the Derwent Valley Heritage Way along the River Derwent south you will soon come to the tor. There's fantastic views of Matlock Bath, the Heights of Abraham, Riber Castle and the surrounding Peak District countryside from the summit. The hill also includes a splendid narrow walkway called 'Giddy Ledge'. Only try this if you've a real head for heights though!
You can extend your walk by descending into Matlock Bath through the river gorge. Here you can visit the fantastic Heights of Abraham where you can enjoy a cable car ride to a hill top park. You can turn it into a circular walk by crossing the river in Matlock Bath and returning via the Height of Abraham and Shining Cliff. See the video below for more details of this route.
The Limestone Way also runs through Matlock so you could pick this up and head towards the village of Bonsall through the countryside. View Full Details>>
High Vinnalls2 miles (4 km)Climb to this wonderful viewpoint on this circular walk in Mortimer Forest in Ludlow. It's a challenging climb with the High Vinnals viewpoint reaching a height of over 1200ft. From the high points there are fabulous panoramicviews over the surrounding Herefordshire countryside.
This walk uses part of the Mortimer Trail long distance footpath. It starts at the High Vinnalls car park but you could start from Ludlow and follow the Mortimer Trail through the Mary Knoll Valley to reach the hill. To extend your walk you could follow the trail south to Croft Ambrey Hill Fort and woods. You'll also find the magnificent Croft Castle surrounded by 1500 acres of parkland, farmland and woods. Just to the east of the hill you will also find Overton Common and a deer park. View Full Details>>
High Wheeldon2 miles (2.5 km)This walk climbs High Wheeldon Hill in the Upper Dove Valley area of the Peak District. It's a popular walk with the hill summit giving wonderful views over the Peak District. You can see Parkhouse Hill, Chrome Hill and the villages of Earl Sterndale,LongnorandCrowdecot.
The walk starts from the little village of Earl Sterndale near Buxton. The village is a popular start point for walks because of its proximity to Dovedale, Parkhouse Hill and Chrome Hill. There's a nice old pub called the Quiet Woman where you can find refreshments at the end of your walk. From the village you head east along a nice country lane to Wheeldon Trees Farm where you begin your ascent of the hill. The view from the top is one of the best of the Upper Dove Valley with Axe Edge Moor also visible. The walk then returns to Earl Sterndale the same way. View Full Details>>
High Willhays6 miles (9 km)Climb to the highest point on Dartmoor on this splendid circular walk in the Dartmoor National Park. The walk starts at the car park at Meldon Reservoir and takes you to the 621metres (2,039ft)summit via Longstone Hill and Black Tor.
You start with a pleasant waterside section along the shores of the pretty Meldon Reservoir. It has a spectacular dam with wonderful views over the West Okement valley. You then leave the reservoir climbing Longstone Hill towards Black Tor with its strking Logan Stone and great views over Walkhampton Common. The route then heads to the summit of High Willhays where there are fabulous views over Dartmoor and Devon. From the summit you descend to the impressive Yes Tor. It is the second highest peak on Dartmoor just two metres below High Willlhays.
The final section descends over Okehampton Common to the reservoir and the finish point. It's a challenging walk but on generally good paths and wonderful views as the reward. Also look out for Dartmoor Ponies as you go.
If you'd like to continue your walk you could follow the footpath around Meldon Reservoir or pick up the Dartmoor Way or Granite Way which also run past the reservoir.
You could start the walk from the nearby town of Okehampton by following the Granite Way to the reservoir. View Full Details>>
Highdown Hill and Highdown Gardens3 miles (5 km)This walk visits Highdown Gardens before climbing Highdown Hill in the South Downs. The walk begins at the car park at Highdown Gardens. Both the gardens and parking are free, though you are free to make a donation if you wish. You can then follow a series of footpaths through the park with its beautiful collection of rare plants and trees. The chalk gardens are situated on Downland countryside with wonderful views towards the sea. Highlights include two pretty ponds with fish, toads and newts, a Himalayan Birch Bark Cherry Avenue, a Rose Garden and a Herb Garden.
After touring the gardens you can then continue your walk to Highdown Hill. The hill stands at81 metres (266ft) and is a popular spot for walkers. From the summit there are wonderful views of thecoast including the Seven Sistersand theIsle of Wight.
Highdown Hill and Highdown Gardens are located in between Littlehampton and Worthing. View Full Details>>
Hole of Horcum5 miles (8 km)Enjoy a circular walk around this beautiful natural amphitheatre in the North York Moors. The hollow is 400ft deep and was created over thousands of years by a series of landslides caused by water pressure.
The walk starts from the parking area by Horcum Wood and takes you across Levisham Moor to Dundale Griff and Horcum Slack before returning to the car park. You'll pass interesting Bronze Age barrows, rocky ravines, woodland, waterfalls and streams on your way through this lovely area.You can also see wild flowers and purple heather on the moor in the spring and summer. It's also a splendid area for wildlife - look out for deer,grouse, curlew, lapwing, merlin and golden plover.
There is the possibility of a short diversion to Skelton Tower. A footpath leading west from Dundale Griff leads to this splendid beauty spot which commands great views over Newtondale.
The Hole of Horcum is located near to the villages of Saltergate and Levisham. The walk could also be easily started from either of these locations.
The area is located just north of the splendid Dalby Forest where you can enjoy miles of waymarked walking and cycling trails. Also nearby is the splendid Bridestones Nature Reserve with its ancient sandstone rocks, woodland and meadows. The long distance Tabular Hills Walk runs right past the site. The waymarked trail can be followed to Dalby Forest, Cropton Forest and the Bridestones. View Full Details>>
Holmbury Hill3 miles (4.5 km)Climb to the 856 feet (261m) summit of Holmbury Hill on this circular walk in the Surrey Hills. The hill is the fourth highest point in the county and commands wonderful views over the surrounding area.
The walk starts in the village of Holmbury St Mary, next to the church. You then pick up the Greensand Way and follow it through Hurt Wood to the hill summit where you will find anIron Agehillfort and great views over the Weald of Sussex. You descend on more good woodland trails, returning you to the village. The area is also good for mountain bikers with a number of bridleways through Hurt Wood to try.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could head east and climb the nearby Leith Hill, the highest point on theGreensand Ridge.
If you head west you can climb Pitch Hill and explore the expansive Hurt Wood and Winterfold Forest. View Full Details>>
Holnicote Estate3 miles (5 km)This walk visits Selworthy Beacon and Bury castle in the splendid Holnicote Estate in Somerset. You start off in the village of Selworthy next to the church, and head to the nearby Bury Castle where you will find an Iron Age enclosure dating back to 400 B.C. You then climb to the 308 metres (1,010ft) high Selworthy Beacon where there are marvellous views across Exmoor and the Somerset coast. It is one of the highest points in the Exmoor National Park along with Dunkery Beacon. From the high point you descend on Folly Combe, returning to the church soon after.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area you could head to the nearby Dunkery Beacon. It is the highest point in Exmoor and consists of a beautiful nature reserve with woodland walks. You could also pick up the South West Coast Path and head west along this lovely stretch of coastline towards Bossington Hill and Porlock or east toward Minehead. View Full Details>>
Holyhead Mountain2 miles (3.5 km)Climb to the summit of Holyhead Mountain on this walk on Holy Island, Anglesey. From the 722 feet (220m) summit there are magnificent views towards the Isle of Man, the Skerries and the mountains of Ireland.
The walk starts from the car park at the lovely Breakwater Country Park. The park covers 100 acres and includes a nature trail, a large pond and a visitor centre. You then follow the coast path to North Stack before ascending the mountain. The mountain is historically significant with a lateRomanwatchtower at the summit and an Iron Agestone circlesettlement near its foot. The area is wonderful for wildlife watching with puffins,stonechats and oyster catchers to look out for. You may also see grey seals in the summer months.
If you would like to extent your walk you could continue along the coast to South Stack Lighthouse. Here you can descend the 400 steps to the island and enjoy fabulous views on the way. The area also includes the South Stack RSPB nature reserve where you can look out for puffins and porpoises. View Full Details>>
Horsenden Hill2 miles (2.5 km)This circular walk in Ealing climbs to Horsenden Hill. The hill reaches a height of 85m / 276 ft commanding fine views over the city of London. It's a lovely place for a walk with areas of meadows, woodland, grasslandand wetland attracting a large variety of wildlife. After climbing the hill you can continue your walk in the western part of the site where you will find wildflower meadows, hedgerows and the Grand Union Canal.
The Horsenden Hill site also includes a new Gruffalo trailfor children. Look out for a series of delightful wooden sculptures representing the characters from the book.
You can pick up the footpaths from the car park off Horsenden Lane North. Perivale and Sudbury Town tube stations are also nearby.
The Capital Ring long distance walking trail crosses the hill so you can pick this up to extend your walk. If you follow the path north you will soon come to Sudbury Hill. Head south and you can visit Pitshanger Park and the Perivale Wood nature reserve. The pretty reserve consists of oak woodland, pasture, damp scrub, three ponds and two streams. It's only a 5 minute stroll from the car park and well worth a visit if you have time.
The Grand Union Canal also passes to south of the hill. You can pick up the waterside path and head west to Northolt or east towards Alperton. At Northolt you can visit Northala Fields with it's lakes, streams and four distinctive hills made out of the rubble from the old Wembley Stadium View Full Details>>
Hound Tor5 miles (8.5 km)Hound Tor is considered one of the best view points in the Dartmoor National Park. It's a lovely walk to the 414m (1,358ft) summit with the landscape thought to have inspired 'The Hound of the Baskervilles'.
The walk starts from the Haytor Vale visitor centre where parking is available. You then head to Haytor Rocks which is one of the most popular natural beauty spots in Dartmoor National Park. From here there are excellent views of the coastline, theTeign Estuaryand across Dartmoor. The route then picks up the Haytor Granite Tramway to take you to Holwell Tor and then onto Hound Tor, crossing the pretty Beck Brook on the way. Near the summit you will pass the fascinating remains of adeserted medieval village. It includes several buildings dating from the 13th century including longhouses, smaller houses and barns.
From the summit of Hound Tor you descend to Smallacombe Rocks and cross Haytor Down before returning to Haytor Vale. View Full Details>>
Hutton Roof Crags and Farleton Fell5 miles (8.5 km)Explore some of the finestlimestone pavement in the country on this climb to Hutton Roof Crags and Farleton Fell. The scenery is striking with boulders and unusual rock formations covering the landscape. You'll pass across Hutton Roof Crags and climb over Newbiggin Crags before reaching the high point at Farleton Knot. All the way there are magnificent views over the surrounding fells. The area is also a nature reserve with a wide variety of interesting flora and fauna. Look out for fly orchids, lily of the valley and dark redhelleborine. Wildlife includes small tortoiseshell and brimstone butterflies with birdlife such as woodpecker, long-tailed tits, redwing,fieldfareandmistlethrush. You may also see roe deer.
This circular walk starts in the village of Hutton Roof and follows the Limestone Link - Cumbria over Hutton Roof Crags and Newbiggin Crags before reaching the high point at Farleton Knott. From here there are fabulous views over the Lake District and the Yorkshire Dales. The route then follows country lanes and other footpaths back to Hutton Roof.
Hutton Roof Crags is located a couple of miles west of Kirkby Lonsdale. You could start the walk from here and follow the Limestone Link - Cumbria to the crags.
To extend your walking in the area you could pick up the Lune Valley Ramble and enjoy a riverside stroll along the River Lune.
Also nearby is the beautiful Barbondale where there is a nice walk to Calf Top Hill and along the Barbon Beck. View Full Details>>
Ilkley Moor5 miles (8 km)Visit this geologically fascinating area of West Yorkshire on this challenging and atmospheric circular walk on Ilkley Moor. The moor is in an elevated position above the town with attractive moorland and wonderful views over the surrounding countryside. It's a beautiful place with pretty heather in the summer and a myriad of different footpaths to follow.
Ilkley Moor is located just to the south of the town of Ilkley so you could easily reach it from the bus or train station in the centre of the town. Then follow the Dales Way Link south to take you onto the moor. This route, however, starts from the Cow and Calf car park on Hangingstone Road. Near here you will find the well known Cow and Calf rocks. This striking rock formation consists of a large rock and a smaller one, sitting next to each other like a cow and its calf.
From the rocks follow the paths west across the moor to Cranshaw Thorn Hill and Keighley Road, where you turn south to Whetstone Gate. The route then turns east to take you to another of the major landmarks on the moor. The Twelve Apostles is a fascinating Bronze Age stone circle with 12 stonesmade from the localmillstone grit.
After leaving the Twelve Apostles you head north back towards the car park passing the Backstones stone circle on the way. After your exercise you can enjoy refreshments at the excellent Cow and Calf pub.
The moor is crossed by two excellent long distance walking trails. You could pick up the Dales Way Link and follow it north through Ilkley where it meets the Dales Way. This will take you along the River Wharfe towards Bolton Abbey. Follow it south and it will take you across Bingley Moor to Saltaire and Shipley.
The Ebor Way also crosses the moor. You could follow it to the site from nearby Menston.
For cyclists the West Yorkshire Cycle route runs along the eastern fringe of the moor. View Full Details>>
Ingleborough Mountain8 miles (13 km)One of Yorshire's Three Peaks, Ingleborough stands at a height of 723 metres (2,372ft). This circular walk starts in the village of Clapham and takes you along Clapham lake to Clapdale Woods. You continue along Clapham Beck toward View Full Details>>
Ivinghoe Beacon5 miles (8 km)Climb to the top of this iconic hillin theChilterns on this walk in Buckinghamshire. Ivinghoe Beacon stands at 233m (757ft) and commands fine views over the Chiltern Hills and the Vale of Aylesbury.
The walk starts from the car park next to Pitstone Windmill and makes use of the Icknield Way Path to take you to the summit. The Pitstone Windmill has been restored by the National trust and is well worth a visit before you begin your climb to Beacon Hill. On the way you'll pass through chalk grasslandand woodland with a wide variety of wildlife to look out for.
If you'd like to continue your walk then you could enjoy waterside walking along the nearby Grand Union Canal or pick up the Icknield Way Path which runs past the hill. View Full Details>>
Jenkin's Crag1 miles (1.5 km)This is a nice easy climb to try from Waterhead in Ambleside. It takes you from the northern end of Lake Windermere to a viewpoint overlooking the lake. There's a footpath near to the bus stop on the A591 which is signed for Jenkin's Crag. You climb toward Skelghyll Wood where you pick up woodland trails to the viewpoint. Here you can enjoy great views over the lake to the surrounding mountains. It's a short walk of about 0.5 miles and a nice one to do if you are staying in Waterhead or if you've got half an hour to spare before catching a bus from Waterhead!
The walk also passes the pretty Stagshaw Garden. The gardens are owned by the National Trust and include a lovely collection of shrubs, plants and flowers including rhododendrons, azaleasandcamellias. View Full Details>>
Kentmere Horseshoe12 miles (19 km)This challenging circular route explores the range of fells in the upper Kentmere valley area of the Lake District.The route visits some of the quieter areas of the national park while visiting a series of lesser known fells. There's wonderful views of several lakes, the surrounding fells, the Pennine Hills and the Lancashire coast. The path is generally pretty good for nearly all of the route.
The walk starts from the village of Kentmere located a few miles east of Ambleside. You then climb towards Garburn Nook along Crabtree Brow and Garburn Pass. The route then turns north to Yoke Fell which stands at a height of 706m (2,316ft). From here there are great views of Lake Windermere, Morecambe Bay, Coniston and Langdale.
From Yoke Fell you continue to Ill Bell where you will find a number of columnarcairns and splendid views towards the Scafells. The path continues to Thornthwaite Fell via Froswick Fell with great views of Kentmere Common and Kentmere Reservoir below.
At Thornthwaite Fell you turn east towards Mardale Ill Bell and Harter Fell. Here you can enjoy nice views down towards Haweswater before turning south toward Kentmere Pike.
The path then descends to Shipman Knotts with its rocky outcropsand steep slopes. The final section descends to Wray Crag and High Lane before returning to the village.
To continue your walking in this area you could visit the nearby Brothers Water and Hayeswater. Also nearby is the excellent circuit of Haweswater. View Full Details>>
Kerry Ridgeway15 miles (24 km)This is an exceptionally beautiful walk or cycle through Powys and then into Shropshire.
The route runs along a ridge top overlooking Wales on the one side and England on the other with spectacular views for the duration of the ride.
You start at Cider House Farm near Kerry and head east to Bishop's Castle passing through Ceri Forest on the way. You will pass through heather moors, woodlands and bilberry rich heaths with fabulous views of the Welsh and Shropshire Hills. View Full Details>>
Kinder Scout7 miles (11 km)Explore the Kinder plateau on this exhilarating and challenging circular walk. You will enjoy spectacular views of the Hope Valley and pass some fascinating gritstone rock formations.
The walk begins in the pretty village of Edale which can be reached by train from Manchester or Sheffield. You then pick up the Pennine Way and follow it to Upper Booth and on to the recently restored Jacob’s Ladder footpath. The route then follows the spectacular Kinder plateau where you can enjoy some of the best views in the Peak District. At Grindsbrook Clough you descend to Edale along the delightful Grinds Brook with waterfalls and splendid views along the way.Mam Tor is located nearby so you could climb this dramatic hill to continue your walking in the area. The Pennine Way also runs through the area so this could be easily picked up too. View Full Details>>
Kinver Edge2 miles (4 km)This National Trust owned woodlandescarpment has miles of good walking trails to try. It's excellent walking country with lovely heathland, woodland trails and magnificent views over the surrounding Staffordshire and Worcestershire countryside. The sandstone ridge also includes an Iron Age Hill Fort and fascinating red sandstone formations. You can stop and admire the views from a number of seats dotted along the ridge top path.
This circular walk around the site starts from the parking area off Compton Road next to the Holy Austin Rock. You then follow a nice way marked trail along Kinver Edge to Nanny's Rock. You can actually explore this fascinating sandstone rock house with its five empty rooms and the 'devil's' chimney.
Just after Nanny's Rock the path heads north east through some pretty bluebell woods before returning to Holy Austin Rock House. This rock house has been restored by the National Trust so you can see how it would have looked when people lived in them. The houses are carved right into the rock and were inhabited right up until the 1960s.
The area is great for wildlife watching with highlights including green hairstreak butterflies, willow warbler and cuckoo. It's also great for flora with yellow gorse and lovely purple heather in the late summer months.
The long distance Staffordshire Way, Worcestershire Way and North Worcestershire Path all pass the site. You can easily pick up any of these trails to extend your walking in the area. Heading south will take you through Kingsford Country Park to Drakelow where there is a small multivallate Iron Age hillfort. Continuing along the Worcestershire Way will take you to Shatterford Lakes Wildlife Sanctuary, Eymore Wood and Trimpley Reservoir.
Heading north from the edge along the Staffordshire Way will take you to Enville. Cookley village on the River Stour can be also be easily reached by descending along the North Worcestershire Path. These are all nice places to visit if you feel like stretching your legs further.
For cyclists National Cycle Network Route 54 passes through Cookley just to the east of the site. If you are coming from Kidderminster you could follow the route north to Cookley and then follow country lanes east to each Kinver Edge. View Full Details>>
Kit Hill1 miles (2 km)This country park in Cornwall covers 400 acres with miles of good footpaths to try. The park was given to the people of Cornwall in 1985 by Prince Charles to mark the birth ofhis son Prince William. You can climb to the 334m (1,096ft) Kit Hill summit and enjoy wonderful views over the Tamar Valley AONB, DartmoorandBodmin Moor. At the top of the hill you'll find an artificial fortand a folly built built in the style of a low-walledSaxoncastle. There's also a number of viewing tables which highlight features of the surrounding countryside you can see from the summit.
The area is great for wildlife with buzzards, sparrowhawks, deer and various butterflies to look out for. Attractive vegetation includes heathers, gorses, grasses and bilberry. There's also an interesting mining history with the 19th century Summit Stack a well known landmark.
The park is located just to the north of Callington and has a car park on the eastern side near Monkscross.
To continue your walking in the area you could try the Tamar Valley Discovery Trail and enjoy a waterside walk along the River Tamar. If you head a couple of miles east to Chilsworthy you can pick up the trail there. Also nearby is the splendid Cotehele House. The Tudor house has nice footpaths taking you around the extensive grounds. View Full Details>>
Langdale Pikes4 miles (7 km)This popular walk takes you to the top of the Langdale Pikes. One of the best known features of Great Langdale they include the Pike of Stickle, Loft Crag, Harrison Stickle and Pavey Ark. Alfred Wainright said of the Langdale Pikes: 'No mountain profile arrests and excites the attention more than that of the Langdale Pikes and no mountain group better illustrates the dramatic appeal of a sudden rising of the vertical from the horizontal; the full height from valley to summit is revealed at a glance in one simple abrupt upsurge to all travellers on the distant shore of Windermere and, more intimately, on the beautiful approach along Great Langdale. Nor is the appeal visual only: that steep ladder to heaven stirs the imagination, and even the emotions, and this is especially so whenever the towering peaks come into view suddenly and unexpectedly..'
The walk starts from the New Dungeon Ghyll National Trust car park and follows the spectactular Dungeon Ghyll Force waterfall on a footpath largely consisting of a series of stone steps. Most of the path is quite easy although there are a couple of rockier sections which require a bit of scrambling.
When you reach the summit you are rewarded with magnificent views of the surrounding area, with Lake Windermere and Elterwater clearly visible. The walk then takes you around the peaceful Stickle Tarn before passing Pavey Ark and heading west to Harrision Stickle. You continue to Pike of Stickle before descending to Loft Crag and Mark Gate.
If you'd like to try another nearby fell you could head to the nearby Bowfell. The route for this starts from very near to the start point for this one. View Full Details>>
Lantern Pike5 miles (8 km)This climb to Lantern Pike from Hayfield makes use of the Pennine Bridleway. It's a circular walk which starts in the village of Hayfield and takes you along the Sett Valley Trail to Birch Vale Reservoir. Here you turn north and climb to the 373 metres (1,224ft) summit of the hill. Here you can take in some wonderful views of the surrounding Peak District hills and countryside. The walk then descends to the pretty hamlet of Little Hayfield before crossing Middle Moor and following the Snake Path back to Hayfield.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area then a walk to Kinder Scout and Kinder Reservoir is a great option. View Full Details>>
Latrigg5 miles (8.5 km)Climb this popular fell near Keswick on this lovely circular walk in the Lake District National Park. The walk starts in the town of Keswick and ascends Latrigg using the Cumbria Way and other footpaths. You continue towards Brundholme before returning through Brundholme Wood with a section along the Keswick Railway Path leading back into Keswick. This final section includes waterside walking along the River Greta.
The summit stands at 368m (1,207ft) and the views of Derwent Water, Keswick and down the valley ofBorrowdaleare stunning. This is a popular walk because of its proximity to Keswick. It is also a relatively straightforward climb on well defined paths.
Another popular fell is the nearby Catbells which gives faboulous views across Derwent Water.
Also nearby is the fascinating Castlerigg Stone Circle. The ancient stone circle is located about a mile from Kewswick and is well worth a visit. View Full Details>>
Latterbarrow4 miles (5.7 km)This is a fairly easy climb to Latterbarrow Hill in the Lake District. The hill reaches a height of 803 feet (245m) with splendid views over Esthwaite Water and Lake Windermere.
This circular walk starts in Hawkshead, following country lanes and footpaths to the hill summit where you will find a stone monument. There's also splendid views of a number of fells including the Fairfield Horseshoe and Red Screes. The walk then descends through the woodland on Claife Heights, passing a number of tarns on the way.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could head to the nearby Wray Castle or explore the tarns and woodland of Claife Heights. View Full Details>>
Leckhampton Hill4 miles (6 km)This circular walk takes you along a particularly beautiful section of the Cotswold Way National Trail visiting Leckhampton Hill and Hartley Hill. The walk starts at a parking area next to the A435 about three miles south of the centre of Cheltenham. From here you can pick up the Cotswold Way and follow the track to Charlton Kings Common and Hartley Hill. You cross the hill to to the Devil’s Chimney, an iconic Cotswold landmark. This unusuallimestonerock formationstands above a disusedquarryinLeckhampton. It's a picturesque spot with fabulous countryside views providing a wonderful backdrop to the chimney. The area of Leckhampton Hill and Charlton Kings Common is a biological and geological Site of Special Scientific Interest and a Key Wildlife Site. Look out for a variety of interesting flora and fauna such as meadow pipitandgrasshopper warbler. Rare plants includefly orchid,musk orchidand purplemilk-vetch.
The walk finishes with a stroll along a country lane which leads back to the start point.
If you would like to extend your walk then you could continue along the Cotswold Way to the delightful Crickley Hill Country Park. View Full Details>>
Leith Hill4 miles (6 km)Climb to the highest point in the South East on this challenging walk in the Surrey Hills AONB. Leith Hill is located near Dorking and is also the highest point on the Greensand Ridge. On the summit of Leith Hill is an 18th century Gothic tower, with panoramic views northwards to London and south to the English Channel. The area is run by the National Trust so the tower has been restored and contains a viewing point with a telescope and refreshments at the Tower servery. There are also self guided trails through woodland, farmland and parkland.
The walk begins at the car park on the western side of the hill and takes you to the high point on the Greensand Way long distance footpath. You then head towards Coldharbour and Whiteberry Hill, crossing Wotton Common, before returning to the car park.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could head to the nearby village of Holmbury St Mary and climb Holmbury Hill for great views over the Weald of Sussex. View Full Details>>
Liddington Hill9 miles (14.5 km)This circular walk uses the Ridgeway and the Aldbourne Circular Walk to climb Liddington Hill near Swindon. On the hill you will find Liddington Castle, a lateBronze Ageand earlyIron Agehill fort. The route climbs to a height over 900 feet with fantastic views over the countryside of the North Wessex Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.
You start the walk at the car park just south of the village of Chiseldon. You then follow footpaths up to Folly Farm before turning north to climb Liddington Hill. You can then explore Liddington Castle, one of the earliest hill forts in Britain, dating back to the seventh century BC.It's a fascinating and often tranquil area with few visitors.
After taking in the wonderful views the walk then descends to Sugar Hill and Shipley Bottom before returning to Folly Farm and the car park.
An alternative route is to follow the Aldbourne Circular Walk from the village of Aldbourne. It's located a few miles south east of the hill.
You could extend your walk by picking up the Chiseldon and Marlborough Railway Path. The disused railway runs to Marlborough through some lovely countryside with views of the River Kennet and a visit to some pretty Wiltshire villages.
Also nearby is the splendid Coate Water Country Park which has nice cycling and walking trails around a large lake. View Full Details>>
Lingmoor Fell4 miles (6 km)Enjoy wonderful views of the Langdale Valley on this walk to Lingmoor Fell in the Lake District. This route starts from The Old Dungeon Ghyll hotel and takes you to the 469m (1,539ft) summit via Side Pike. The fell divides the valleys ofGreat LangdaleandLittle Langdale commanding splendid views of the two. The walk includes a woodland section at the start and the option to take a small detour to the beautiful Lingmoor Tarn. If you are looking for a shorter route to the summit then you could park at the car park at Blea Tarn and head north along the country lane to Bleatarn house where a path will take you to the summit of Lingmoor Fell. View Full Details>>
Little Solsbury Hill3 miles (5.5 km)This circular walk climbs this small hill made famous by the Peter Gabriel song 'Solsbury Hill'. The walk starts in the village of Batheaston, following footpaths to the hill summit. From here there are super views over Bath and the surrounding countryside. The route then heads along Chilcombe Bottom to Northend, passing two reservoirs on the way. The last section follows the Limestone Link back to Batheaston.
If you're coming from the centre of Bath you can reach the hill by following the Kennet and Avon Canal to Bathampton and then picking up the Limestone Link to take you to Little Solsbury Hill. View Full Details>>
Long Man of Wilmington5 miles (8.5 km)Climb to this iconic figure on Windover Hill on this splendid circular walk in the South Downs. The walk begins in the village of Alfriston on the Cuckmere River and follows the South Downs Way to the Long Man. It's a fairly easy climb on a good path with splendid views of the South Downs and the coast to enjoy. From the high point you descend to Litlington passing the delightful Lullington Heath Nature Reserve on the way. It's a lovely area made up of chalk heath with heather and bell heather, surrounded by gorse bushes. At Litlington you pick up the Vanguard Way and enjoy a lovely waterside section along the Cuckmere River which takes you back to Alfriston.
If you enjoy this walk then you could try the Cuckmere River and Cuckmere Haven walk which also starts from Alfriston. View Full Details>>
Long Mynd6 miles (9 km)This walk takes you to Pole Bank, the highest point on the Long Mynd in the Shropshire Hills AONB. Much of this beautiful area is owned and managed by theNational Trust so there are good footpaths to follow to the 516m (1,693ft) summit.
The walk starts at the National Trust's Carding Mill Valley visitor centre and car park in Church Stretton. You begin by following a pretty stream uphill on a good stony path. You continue along Mott's Road passing Calf Ridge and Lightspot Hollow where there is the option to take a short detour to Lightspot Waterfall. At the top of the hill you head west along the ancient Portway, passing a Neolithic monument which was converted to a shooting box during the Victorian period. You soon come to the summit at Pole Bank where there are magnificent views of the Brecon Beacons, the Cambrian andBerwynMountains, Snowdoniaand the Malverns. After taking in the views you descend passing the spring at Boiling Well and continuing through Townbrook Valley with its pretty brook and Victorian reservoir. A short woodland section then takes you to the finish point at the car park.
The walk makes use of the Shropshire Way and the Jack Mytton Way so there is the option of continuing your walk along these long distance footpaths. You could also climb the nearby Caer Caradoc for more fabulous views. If you're looking for a shorter less strenuous walk you could visit the reservoir and waterfall on the Carding Mill Valley walk. View Full Details>>
Longridge Fell5 miles (7.5 km)Enjoy a walk to the summit of England's most southerley fell on this wonderful walk in the Forest of Bowland. The walk begins at the car park at Turner Fold and takes you to the 1,148-ft (350-m) summit on woodland footpaths. There are fabulous views from the high point including theFylde Coast, the Vale of Chipping, the fells of theForest of Bowland (includingParlick,Fair Snape FellandBeacon Fell), theYorkshire Dales and on a clear day the Lake District fells.
Longridge Fell is situated to the north of both Preston and Blackburn. View Full Details>>
Lonscale Fell4 miles (6 km)Climb to Lonscale Fell from Keswick on this lovely walk in the Lake District. From the 715m (2,346ft) summit there are splendid views over ThirlmereandDerwentwater. It's a nice climb which you can start from the centre of Keswick. The route follows the Cumbria Way long distance footpath out of the town, climbing through the woodland of Whinny Brow to Ewe How. You continue on to Lonscale Fell, passing Latrigg, Whit Beck and Lonscale Crags on the way. The route leaves the Cumbria Way on Lonscale Crags and heads towards the hill summit. It's a nice, fairly short climb on good footpaths with wonderful views over many of the major fell groups.
There's lots of good options for extending your walking in the area. You could climb to Latrigg or visit the fascinating ancient stones at Castlerigg Stone Circle.
At Whit Beck you could turn north west and up Skiddaw Little Man to Skiddaw.
A similar climb to this one can be found at Great Wood with the climb to Walla Crag. View Full Details>>
Lord Hereford's Knob (Twmpa)1 miles (2 km)This is a short climb to Lord Hereford's Knob or Twmpa in the Black Mountains. The scenery is stunning with magnificent views over the Brecon Beacons National Park on one side and the Herefordshire countryside on the other.
You can park at the Gospel Pass car park about 1 mile to the east of the hill. From here you can pick up the footpath to the 690m (2,260ft) summit.
Like the nearby Hay Bluff the entire hill is designated as open country so walkers have thefreedom to roamat will.
You could start the walk from Hay-on-Wye if you prefer. Just follow the Offa's Dyke Path south to the Hay-on-Bluff car park and stone circle. Then follow country lanes or other footpaths to Twmpa. View Full Details>>
Loughrigg Fell2 miles (3 km)The climb to Loughrigg fell from Grasmere is a very popular one. It's a reasonably straightforward climb with wonderful views over Rydal Water and Grasmere Lake. The walk starts in the centre of Grasmere and follows country lanes and good footpaths to the 335m (1,099ft) summit. You start by following Red Bank road from Grasmere which runs around the western side of the lake before picking up a footpath to the summit which is effectivley a series of stone steps. The route also passes Loughrigg Terrace which is well worth a short detour. This level path affords wonderful views towards Helm Cragand the Fairfieldgroup and leads to the fascinating Loughrigg Caves.
From the Loughrigg Fell summit there are lovely views of Elterwater, Langdale, the Coniston Fells and Windermere. You will also find anOrdnance Surveytriangulation column beside a largecairn.
The fell is on the Windermere Way circular walk, so you can pick this up to extend your walk.
You could also descend the hill to the south and visit the tranquil Loughrigg Tarn and continue to Elterwater where you can enjoy a waterside stroll along the River Brathay and visit Skelwith Force waterfall. View Full Details>>
Loughrigg Tarn2 miles (3 km)This circular walk takes you to the lovely Loughrigg Tarn from Skelwith Bridge. The walk starts from the Skelwith Bridge Hotel and follows country lanes and footpaths around the pretty tarn. It's a fairly easy climb to the high point above the tarn with splendid views of the surrounding fells. It's a secluded peaceful spot which was a favourite of William Wordsworth.
It's possible to continue your walk north and climb to the top of Loughrigg Fell. The Colwith Force waterfall walk also starts from Skelwith Bridge. It follows the Cumbria Way to the 40ft falls through some lovely countryside and woodland. View Full Details>>
Lydeard Hill2 miles (2.5 km)Climb to Lydeard Hill in the Quantocks an enjoy splendid views over the surrounding countryside.
You can start your walk from the Lydeard Hill car park on Lydeard Hill Road. It's a good sized parking area with great views, located just a mile east of the village of West Bagborough. From here you can pick up the footpaths to the hill summit which is a short distance from the car park. Head through the gate and then follow the wide paths to the hill top. You can then continue around the hill where there are nice woodland sections and open countryside to enjoy.
You can extend your walk by picking up the Samaritans Way South West and following it to the nearby Wills Neck and Cothelstone Hill. View Full Details>>
Maiden Castle Dorset2 miles (2.5 km)Climb to this Iron Agehill fort near Dorchester and enjoy wonderful views over the surrounding countryside. Maiden Castle is the largest and most famous pre-Roman fortress in Britain. It covers almost 100 acres with banks as high as 80 feet enclosing a hill-top site of about 45 acres. It was inhabited as early as the Bronze Age, but most of the visible ramparts were erected in the 1st century BC.
There is a car park on Maiden Castle Road just north of the hill fort. From here you can pick up good footpaths to take you around the site. There's superb views to Dorchester and over the Dorset countryside as you make your way round the fort.
You can reach the site by bike by following National Cycle Network Route 2 from Dorchester. You can pick up the route from the centre of town near the train station. It's then about a one mile ride along Maiden Castle Road to the site.
The South West Coast Path runs just to the south of the hill so you could pick it up and head west to the Hardy Monument to extend your walk. View Full Details>>
Malham Cove9 miles (14 km)This super walk visits two well known beauty spots in the Yorkshire Dales. It begins at the village of Malham and follows the Pennine Way to the stunning Malham Cove. The cove is a huge curved cliff formation of limestone rock with a vertical cliff face of about 260 feet high.There are fabulous views across the Yorkshire Dales from the high point.
From the cove you continue to climb towards the beautiful Malham Tarn. The tarn is owned by the National Trust and is also a designated nature reserve. The walk takes you around the tarn on footpaths and country lanes before returning to Malham village on the Pennine Way.
An alternative route takes you to the tarn via the spectacular Gordale Scar where you will find twowaterfallsand overhanging limestone cliffs over 100 metres high. View Full Details>>
Malvern Hills8 miles (13 km)This walk takes you the full length of the Malvern Hills from End Hill in North Malvern to Chase End Hill at the southern end. The Hills divide the counties of Herefordshire and Worcestershire and are covered with numerous footpaths and bridleways.
The start point for the walk is the car park at North Malvern in the 19th centuryspa townofGreat Malvern. You then pass End Hill, Table Hill and Sugarloaf Hill on your way to Worcestershire Beacon. At 425 m (1,394ft) the Beacon is the highest point in the Malverns and offers fabulous views of Worcestershire, Herefordshire, Gloucestershire, the Cotswolds, the Welsh Mountains and the Severn Valley.
You continue to Jubilee Hill, Black Hill and Herefordshire Beacon where you will find aBritish Iron Agehill fortearthwork and the British Camp reservoir. Next you come to Hangman's Hill, and Swinyard Hill before arriving at the interesting Midsummer Hill where you will find anIron Agehill fortwhich spans Midsummer Hill and Hollybush Hill. There are also splendid views of Eastnor Castle and lake.
The final section takes you over Raggedstone Hillto the finish point at the end of the range, known as End Hill.
It's a delightful walk on good footpaths with fabulous views throughout. Also look out for the springs and fountains dotted along the hills. View Full Details>>
Mam Tor3 miles (4.5 km)This 517m (1,696ft) hill in the Peak District affords fabulous views over the surrounding area. This circular walk starts at the car park at the southern side of the hill and takes you to the summit on well defined walking trails and stone steps. The scenery is beautiful and dramatic with fine views over the Hope Valley and Edale Valley. The area is also geologically significant with Mam Tor consisting of 320 million year old Carboniferousrocks.
From the summit you descend to Hollins Cross before turning south and continuing your descent to Mam Farm and Little Mam Tor. At Winnats Head Farm you turn west to return to the finish point.
If you would like to continue your walking then the nearby Kinder Scout is a good option. It is the highest point in the Peak District and affords fabulous views to Manchester, Snowdonia and Winter Hill.
You could also try the Castleton Circular Walk and visit the toweringlimestonepinnacles at Winnats Pass before climbing the 476m (1,562ft) high Lose Hill for more great views of the Hope Valley.
Another great option is to try the Great Ridge Walk from Mam Tor to Lose Hil. This takes you across a stunning ridge with more wonderful views to enjoy. View Full Details>>
Marcle Ridge Circular Walk4 miles (6 km)Climb to Marcle Ridge and enjoy splendid views towards the Malvern Hills on this circular walk in Herefordshire. It's a lovely area with attractive woodland areas and interesting plants such as orchids and spurge laurel to look out for. From the elevated position on the ridge there are super views of the Cotswold Hills, the Wye Valley, the Brecon Beacons and the Black Mountains.
There's a parking area off Glowson Wood Rd where you can start your walk. Pick up the footpath here and follow it north through Hoar Wood to Hooper's Oak. The route then turns west and then south to Hyde Common and Lyndalls Wood. The final section takes you along Ridge Hill before returning to the car park where there is a picnic area nearby.
The Three Choirs Way and the Herefordshire Trail both pass Marcle Ridge so it's easy to extend your walking in the area. If you head north west along the Three Choirs Way you could visit Broadmoor Common and Haugh Woods where there's lots more footpaths and wildlife to look out for. Heading north will take you across Marcle Hill to Woolhope Cockshoot. View Full Details>>
Mardon Down5 miles (8 km)Climb to Mardon Down on Dartmoor and enjoy wonderful far reaching views over the surrounding area. The hill is also home to a fascinating set of ancient stone circles and covered with lots of interesting plants and flowers. It's a really pretty spot and well worth the challenging climb.
The walk starts in the village of Moretonhmapstead about 1.5 miles south west of the hill. You then follow footpaths towards Yarningdale before crossing the down. You'll pass a cairn circle before coming to Mardon Down stone circle which is the biggest on Dartmoor. The walk climbs to well over 1000 ft so it is a fairly challenging ascent. You are rewarded with wonderful views towards the Devon coast, Hay Tor, Hound Tor and Exmoor. It's great for wildlife too with birds such as stonechats, skylarks and cuckoos to look out for. You might also see Dartmoor ponies and rabbits as you make your way across the hill.
You can continue across the down towards Cod Wood, Dunsford Wood Nature Reserve and Meadhaydown Nature Reserve. These are all just a mile or so north east of Mardon Down.
Both the Dartmoor Way and the Dartmoor Ramble pass Moretonhmapstead so it is easy to extend your walking in the area. View Full Details>>
May Hill1 miles (2 km)Climb this hill on the Gloucestershire/Herefordshire border for wonderful views over the two counties, the Forest of Dean and the River Severn. On a clear day you can also see the Cotswolds and the Black Mountains in Wales.
The walk starts from the May Hill Common car park about a mile north of the hill. You then climb to the 1000ft (305m) summit where you will find a distinctive row of Corsican pine trees planted to commemorate Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee in 1887. The summit is also covered in interesting flora such as acid grassland, heather and bluebells in the spring. Look out for wildlife including ponies and meadow pipits on the way.
You can return the same way or venture into the adjacent Newent Woods and visit Glasshouse Hill and Castle Hill Wood to extend your walk. The Gloucestershire Way and the Wysis Way both pass the hill so you could also pick up these long distance walking trails.
An alternative route to the hill would be to follow the Wysis Way from nearby Mitcheldean. View Full Details>>
Moel Arthur2 miles (2.5 km)This short climb follows the Offa's Dyke Path from the Clywd Forest to Moel Arthur in the Clwydian Range AONB.
You can start the walk from the car park at the eastern end of the Clywd Forest, about a mile north west of Moel Arthur. You then follow good footpaths to the summit where there are lovely views over the Vale of Clywd and the other mountains on the Clwydian Range. The area also has an interesting history with an Iron Age Hillfort with some of the largest banks and ditches in the area.
If you would like to extend your walking in the area then you could continue south along the Offa's Dyke Path to the nearby Moel Famau Country Park. Here you can climb the 1818ft high Moel Famau for wonderful views of the Wirral, Merseyside, Snowdonia, the Dee Valley and the coast. View Full Details>>
Moel Eilio8 miles (13 km)This circular walk climbs to Moel Eilio from Llanberis in the Snowdonia National Park. It's a challenging climb with the option of continuing up to the peak of Snowdon Llanberis Path after reaching the Moel Eilio peak.
Start your walk in Llanberis and head past the quarries to Bwlch y Groes. Here you can ascend to the summit on the north ridge of Moel Eilio, passing Bryn Mawr on the way. From the 726m (2,382ft) summit there are splendid views towards Snowdon and the surrounding mountains. After taking in the views you descend to thesubsidiary summits ofFoel Gronand Foel Goch. The path then descends past Cefn Drum and the Llanberis Waterfall before returning to the town.
An alternative route is to start from the Snowdon Ranger Path car park and head to the summit via Foel Gron and Foel Groch. See the video below for details of this route and to give you an idea of the scenery you can expect to see on this walk.
To extend your walking in the area you can climb to the Snowdon Peak on the Snowdon Llanberis Path or visit the beautiful Padarn Country Park on the shores of Lake Padarn. View Full Details>>
Moel Famau Country Park3 miles (5.5 km)Climb to the top of Moel Famau mountain on this circular walk through the stunning Moel Famau Country Park. The walk starts at the car park at Bwlch Penbarra and immediately picks up the Offa's Dyke Path to take you to the 1818ft peak. Part of the Clwydian Range the mountain peak proffers wonderful views of the Wirral, Merseyside, Snowdonia, the Dee Valley and the coast. At the summit you will also find the 19th century Jubilee Tower constructed in 1810 to commemorate the Golden Jubilee of King George III. The climb from the car park is not too strenuous so would suit reasonably fit walkers. It also takes place on a good path. From the summit the trails then descend through the Clwyd Forest before returning you to the car park.
If you'd like to continue your walking in this beautiful area then you could visit the nearby Loggerheads Country Park. Located just a few miles to the east it contains dramatic limestone cliffs, wooded gorges and secluded grasslands next to the River Alyn.
Also of interest is the Iron Age Hillfort at Moel Arthur just to the north of the park.
Moel Famau is located near Mold in in Flintshire. View Full Details>>
Moel Hebog2 miles (3 km)This challenging walk climbs Moel Hebog from Beddgelert in the Snowdonia National Park. There's great views of the Welsh coastline and several peaks including Snowdon, Moel Siabod and the Nantlle Ridge. Please note that while this is a great walk the path is not always well defined and there is a degree of scrambling involved.
The walk starts from the picturesque village of Beddgelert with its fine bridge crossing theRiver Colwyn and a number of good pubs for refreshment. You then follow footpaths out of the village and through a woodland section before ascending the mountain path. At the 783m (2,569ft) summit you will find a trig point where you can enjoy some stunning views of the surrounding peaks. The walk can be extended by continuing to the peaks ofMoel yr OgofandMoel Lefn.
The area is great for wildlife spotting. Look out for Buzzards, Red Kites and Perigrine Falcons as you make your way up the mountain.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could follow the footpath along the Aberglaslyn Pass. You could also visit the nearby Beddgelert Forest where you'll find miles of walking paths and mountain bike trails. View Full Details>>
Moel Siabod5 miles (8 km)Climb to the summit of Moel Siabod on this challenging walk in Snowdonia. The mountain reaches a peak of 872m making it the highest peak in theMoelwynionmountain range. The views from the summit are particularly special. On a clear day the you can see Snowdonia, Glyderrau and the Carneddau ranges.
The start point at the village of Pont Cyfyng is delightful, with views of the Afon (river) Llugwy and the Llugwy waterfalls. You then ascend to the summit passing a small lake, a quarry and the lovely Llyn-y-Foel on the way. There's also the spectacular Deaer Ddu south east ridge which requires some scrambling before you reach the summit.
This is a challenging walk with some scrambling required. You are rewarded with wonderful views throughout.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area then the walk to Llyn Cowlyd starts from the nearby Capel Curig car park. View Full Details>>
Mount Caburn4 miles (7 km)This walk visits the delightful Mount Caburn Nature Reserve in the South Downs. You can reach the reserve by following a footpath from the centre of Lewes. It's just over 2 miles to the reserve from the town with the route crossing the River Ouse before passing Malling Down Nature Reserve, Ranscombe Camp hill, Oxteddle Bottom and Caburn Bottom.
The reserve consists of managed chalk downlandand a Bronze Age hill fort. There is also a wide variety of flora and fauna to look out for. This includes the largest British population of burnt-tip orchid and pyramidal orchids. There are also many different types of wildflowers such as Sweet briar, Marjoram and the bright yellow horseshoe vetch. These attract various butterflies including Adonis, chalkhill blue butterfly and silver-spotted skippers. It's also great for bird watching with Skylarks, meadow pipits, yellowhammers, corn bunting, kestrels, peregrine falcon and buzzards to look out for.
The summit of Mount Caburn stands at 480-feet (146m) and consists of an Iron Age Hill Fort. There are wonderful views of Lewes, Glynde, Firle and the South Downs to enjoy.
After climbing the hill you could visit the delightful Little Cottage Tea Rooms and enjoy a cream tea. The tea rooms are located just to the south of the reserve on Ranscombe Lane.
A shorter, alternative route to the reserve is to start from Glynde Bridge. There is a train station and parking area about a mile from the hill.
If you would like to extend your walking in the area then you could head to the nearby Firle Beacon. It is located just a few miles to the south east and offers great views over the Weald towards the south coast. View Full Details>>
Mount Keen11 miles (17 km)This is the shortest route to the summit of Mount Keen, the most easterly of the Scottish Munros. It starts at the Invermark car park in Glen Esk and heads through Glen Mark to the summit. The path is quite good for most of the route but become rockier towards the summit. There are fabulous views of Glen Esk, Loch Lee and theCairngorms. Look out for red deer as you make your way through the beautiful Glen Mark.
Mount Keen stands at 939m (3,081 feet). The walk will probably take about 5-7 hours. View Full Details>>
Mow Cop1 miles (1.5 km)Visit Mow Cop Castle and the Old Man of Mow on this short circular walk on the Cheshire–Staffordshireborder. The castle sits in an elevated position above the village with wonderful views over the surrounding Staffordshire countryside and the Cheshire Plain. The 18th century folly is a well know landmark positioned 355m above sea level and visible for miles around. The walk also visits the Old Man of Mow - an interesting 65ft rock formation just to the north of the castle. Near here is a triangulation pillar and more great views to enjoy.
Mow Cop is on the Gritstone Trail so you can extend your walk by continuing along this long distance trail. View Full Details>>
Mynydd Illtud Common2 miles (3 km)Starting at the Brecon Beacons Visitor Centre, enjoy a stroll across the pretty Mynydd Illtud Common on this easy circular walk. From the common there are great views towards Pen Y Fan and Corn Du, the Black Mountains and the river Usk. It's a good spot for wildlife too - look out for red kites, larks and butterflies. View Full Details>>
Mynydd Mawr5 miles (8 km)Climb to the 698m (2,290ft) summit Mynydd Mawr on this challenging climb in the Snowdonia National Park. On the walk you will enjoy stunning views of Llyn Cwellyn and the surrounding mountains.The walk starts from the village of Rhyd Ddu and follows woodland trails through Beddgelert Forest before climbing above Llyn Cwellyn to Foel Rudd and then on to the Mynydd Mawr summit. There are interesting geological formations, rocky outcrops and breathtakingly beautiful views to enjoy. It's also a fairly quiet walk with most people heading to Snowdon from Rhyd Ddu.
If you'd like to continue your climbing in the area then the Snowdon Rhyd Ddu Path starts from the village too. You could also head along the wonderful Nantlle Ridge. View Full Details>>
Nantlle Ridge9 miles (14 km)This popular circular walk explores the Nantlle Ridge range of mountains in the Snowdonia National Park. You'll visit a series of imposing peaks with magnificent views over Snowdonia.
The walk starts from the village of Rhyd Ddu and heads to the first peak of Y Garn which is only about a mile away. At the 633m (2,077ft) Y Garn summit you will find a rocky plateau, steep cliffs and cairns.
The route continues to the next peak on the ridge - Mynydd Drws-y-Coed. This exposed peak requires a degree of scrambling to reach the 695m (2,280ft) summit.
From here you climb to the second highest peak on the ridge, Trum y Ddysgl. From the 709m (2,326ft) summit you can enjoy wonderful views of Mynydd Mawr,Yr WyddfaandMoel Hebog.
The route then descends to the next peak of Mynydd Tal-y-Mignedd, a subsidiary summit ofTrum y Ddysgl. Here you will find a large stone obelisk, put up to commemorate Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee.
Continuing south west you come to the highest point on the Nantlle Ridge, Craig Cwm Silyn. From the 734m (2,408ft) summit there are wonderful 360 panoramic views of the area. The other peaks on the ridge areGarnedd GochMynydd Graig Goch. They are a few miles west of Craig Cwm Silyn and not visited on this walk.
From Craig Cwm Silyn you descend to Cwm Trwsgl, passing a small reservoir and a quarry. The final section then takes you through the attractive woodland of Beddgelert Forest before returning to Rhyd Ddu. View Full Details>>
Newlands Corner2 miles (3.5 km)This lovely beauty spot on the North Downs is great for walking with a number of footpaths to try. There's several nice woodland trails and open chalk downland with wonderful views over the Surrey Hills. This circular walk starts from the excellent Newlands Corner Visitor centre where you will find information, a cafe, picnic tables and a car park. It's located just a few miles east of Guildford town centre so is easily accessible. The walk follows the North Downs Way and other footpaths around the visitor centre. You'll visit Albury Downs and Walnut Tree Bottom with lots of opportunities to sit on one of the many benches and soak in the splendid views.
It's a great area for flora and fauna. In the summer the grassland is covered with a variety of wildflowers. In the woodland area you may see roe deer, green woodpeckers, nuthatches and tawny owls.
If you would like to extend your walk then you could follow the North Downs Way to the nearby St Martha's Hill.

Also nearby is Chantry Wood where there are some more nice woodland trails and meadows to explore. View Full Details>>
Nicky Nook4 miles (6 km)This walk takes you up a popular and delightful fell in the Forest of Bowland. Starting in the village of Scorton you follow country lanes and footpaths to the 215m summit, passing a pretty tarn on the way. From the summit there are fabulous views of the Fylde coast, Blackpool Tower, Morecambe Bay and the Lake District fells. You descend through the lovely Grizedale, passing along Grizedale Reservoir and through peaceful woodland before returning to Scorton. View Full Details>>
Nine Standards Rigg9 miles (14 km)Enjoy wonderful views over the Eden Valley on this climb to the summit of Hartley Fell in the North Pennines AONB. The walk starts from Kirkby Stephen and climbs to the 662m (2,172ft) summit on a mixture of country lanes and footpaths. You will pass a series of cairns about 10ft tall known as the Nine Standards. At the summit there is a trig point that marks the watershed divide across England. From here, rivers flow west toward the Irish Sea and east toward the North Sea. There are also wonderful views of Cross Fell, Great Dun Fell and theHowgills.
The walk is on Wainwright's Coast to Coast walking route so you could pick this up to continue your walking in the area. View Full Details>>
Norber Erratics2 miles (3 km)This walk climbs to this geologically significant set of glacial erraticboulders in the Yorkshire Dales. The Norber erratics can be reached from the nearby village ofAustwick. It's a short but quite challenging climb from the village to the rocks which are situated on the southern slopes of Ingleborough Mountain. The fascinating boulders were probably deposited by melting ice sheets at the end of thelast ice age, around 12,000 years ago. The walk exposes you to some fine limestone scenery with wonderful views to be enjoyed from the high points. The boulders are dramtically placed with the far reaching dales scenery making a striking backdrop for any photographer.
This walk starts in Austwick and takes you north to the boulders on good footpaths. You could also start from the nearby village of Clapham. The walk can be extended by heading north to Thwaite Scars, Crummack Dale and Moughton Scars. Just to the north of Moughton Scars you can pick up the trail to Ingleborough Mountain at Sulber Nick.
After your exercise you can refresh yourself in the local pub in Austwick.
To further extend your walking in the area you can head west to Clapham where you can enjoy a stroll along Clapham Lake and Clapham Beck. View Full Details>>
Okeford Hill1 miles (2 km)Visit Okeford Beacon in Dorset and enjoy cycling and walking trails with wonderful views. You can park at the Okeford Hill Picnic Site, about a mile to the south of Okeford Fitzpaine. From here you can pick up the Wessex Ridgeway trail to explore the woodland and countryside around Okeford Hill. Many other tracks will take you into Blandford Forest or you can head south west towards Bell Hill and Ibberton Hill.
The area is also home to Okeford Hill Mountain Bike Park. Here you can try a variety of downhill mountain bike trails. See the video below for a sample of what you can expect! There's also bridleways for cyclists at Shillingstone Hill and Blandford Forest. View Full Details>>
Old Man of Coniston5 miles (7.5 km)Climb the 2,634 feet (803m) high Old Man of Coniston on this strenuous walk in the Lake District. The route starts at Coniston village and soon joins Church Beck which you follow for about a mile before heading past Crowberry Haws, Stubthwaite Crag and the dramatically positioned tarn of Low Water to the summit. Here you will find a combined slate platform andcairn with magnificent views of the southern Lake District,Morecambe Bay,Blackpool Tower,Winter Hillin thePennines, the Lancashire coast and theIsle of Man.
This route is popular with tourists and offers a direct and picturesque path to the summit. View Full Details>>
Old Man of Storr5 miles (7.5 km)Climb the famous Old Man of Storr on this stunning walk on the Isle of Skye. The walk takes you to the 719m (2,359ft) high summit on well constructed paths.
The walk starts at car park located at the northern end of Loch Leathan and follows a well defined path to Needle Rock and then on to Coire Scamadal. You then double back and ascend to the summit of the Storr where there are some truly breathtaking views. The Trotternish Ridge stretches away to the north, while the Islands of Harris,Raasayand Rona are all visible to the east. To the south are great views across the Isle of Skye to theCuillinmountains.
You descend following the rim of Coire Faoin towards Bealach Beag and then down to the side of Loch Leathan before finishing back at the car park. View Full Details>>
Old Winchester Hill9 miles (14 km)This walk takes you up the 197 metres (646ft) Old Winchester Hill in the South Downs. The hill and surrounding area is a National Nature Reserve with a wide variety of butterflies and wildlife to look out for. These include buzzards, kites, roe deer and foxes. The area is made largely of chalk grassland with extensive scrub and many orchid species. There is also an Iron Age hill fort and earlier Bronze Age barrows and burial mounds.
This circular walk starts at the village of Meonstoke and makes use of the South Downs Way to take you to Old Winchester Hill before returning via Warnford and Beacon Hill. There are super panoramicviews of the South Downs and the Meon Valley from the high points. On a clear day you may even be able to see the Isle of Wight.
If you'd like to continue your walk then you could pick up the South Downs Way or the Monarch's Way which run past the hill. View Full Details>>
Oldbury Hill1 miles (2 km)Enjoy a series of walking paths around this Iron Age Hillfort near Sevenoaks. The paths will take you through ancient woodland with interesting plants including heather and bilberry. From the high points there are great views of the surrounding countryside. Dating from 100 BC the impressive fort is one of the largest in the country, situated in an excellent defensive position on a very steep hill.
You can start your exercise from the good sized car park off Styants Bottom Road. From here you can pick up a number of trails to take you up to the hill fort which stands at a height of over 600ft. There are also bridleways which are popular with mountain bikers.
To extend your walk you can follow paths south across Raspit Hill and Igtham Common to the splendid Igtham Mote. Here you will find a medieval moated manor house surrounded by gardens, parkland and woodland. You can also pick up the Greensand Way and follow it to the nearby Knole Park where there's more great walks to try around the deer park.
Mountain bikers can head to the nearby Mereworth Woods where there are miles of trails with some good descents and jumps to try. View Full Details>>
Orrest Head2 miles (3.4 km)Orrest Head was the first fell climbed by Alfred Wainwright. It inspired him to a 'to a life made happy by fellwandering' so you can expect some wonderful views over lakeland on this fairly easy climb. It's a great walk to do if you're coming in by train as the start of the climb is located right next to Windermere railway station. The walk involves some lovely woodland sections and fabulous views of Lake Windermere, theOld Man of Coniston,Scafell Pike,Great Gable,Fairfieldand theLangdale Pikes.
This circular walk begins across the main road from the train station. It climbs steadily to Orrest Head on good footpaths before descending to The Causeway Farm. You then turn south and head to High Hay Wood and Elleray Bank before returning to the start/finish point. View Full Details>>
Osmington White Horse3 miles (5.5 km)Climb to the Osmington White Horse and enjoy wonderful views along the Jurassic Coast on this circular walk in Dorset. You start the walk from the interesting village of Osmington, near Weymouth. The village includes a church dating from the 12th century and picturesque thatched dwellings dating back to the 16th century. You then pick up the South Dorset Ridgeway and the South West Coast Path to take you up to Osmington Hill. The distinctive figure dates from the early 19th century and representsKing George IIIriding his horse. After taking in the views you descend to the village of Sutton Poyntz. It's a lovely little village with thatched cottages, a stream with a nice footpath and a mill pond. It's a great place to stop for refreshments before the final leg back to Osmington. This takes you along public footpaths past White Horse Farm before returning you to the village.
If you'd like to continue your walk you could head down to the lovely Osmington Mills and enjoy views of Osmington Bay. Continue east along the coast path and you will pass the site of the medieval village of Ringstead before coming to Ringstead Bay. If you would like to view the white horse without the walk you can visit the new Osmington White Horse viewpoint. It can be found on the A353 heading towards Osmington from Weymouth. It has information boards and a great view of the white horse. View Full Details>>
Painswick Beacon3 miles (5 km)Visit the delightful Cotswolds village of Painswick and climb the nearby Painswick Hill on this walk near Stroud.
The walk starts from Painswick known as the 'Queen of the Cotswolds' because of its picturesque cottages, pretty churchyard with yew trees and the splendid Rococo Gardens. You can then follow the Cotswold Way National Trail north to the beacon. The trail is well signposted and takes you through the local golf course and past the aptly named Paradise valley. You soon come to the beacon where you will find an Iron Age Hill Fort and fabulous views over the Severn Vale, the Forest of Dean and the Welsh Mountains.
From the top of the hill you can descend back to the village or if you'd like to extend your walk, you could continue along the Cotswold Way to the nearby Pope's Wood and Kites Hill. A little further on is Cooper's Hill where the annual Chees Rolling event is held on the Spring Bank Holiday. It involves locals chasing a large round cheese down a near-vertical grass slope.
If you enjoy this walk you could head a couple of miles south west and visit Haresfield Beacon for more great walking trails and panoramic views of the Cotswolds.
You could also follow the Wysis Way long distance trail south and visit the beautiful Slad Valley. The area is famous for its associations with the authorLaurie Lee, who based his book'Cider with Rosie'on his own life in the village. View Full Details>>
Pap of Glencoe5 miles (8 km)This challenging walk takes you up the 742m (2,434ft) high Pap of Glencoe in the Highlands of Scotland. The walk begins at the car park at Lochan to the east of the village of Glencoe. It starts by passing through woodland before beginning the climb along the mountain tracks. It is a steep climb with some muddy sections and some scrambling for the last 100 metres to the summit. However, you will be rewarded with breathtaking views over Glencoe, the Mamores and Loch Leven.
If you are looking for a more gentle walk in the area then you could try the Glencoe Lochan Trail which starts from the same car park. View Full Details>>
Parbold Hill6 miles (9.5 km)This circular walk climbs to Parbold Hill from the village of Parbold in Lancashire. You'll visit the wonderful viewpoint with views towards the Pennine Hills and beyond. The route also continues to climb Harrock Hill and Hunter's Hill for more good views and lovely countryside.
The walk starts from Parbold train station and heads along the Leeds and Liverpool Canal before turning north to climb to the Parbold Hill viewpoint. Here you will find a plaque showing you all of the sights you can see from the top. This includes Ashurst Beacon, Dalton, the River Douglas, the city of Liverpool and the Berwyn Mountains of Wales.
After taking in the views the walk continues north to High Moor and Harrock Hill. The route then turns south, descending to Hunter's Hill before returning to Parbold village.
This walk passes close to Fairy Glen which is well worth a short detour if you have time. The delightful beauty spot includes pretty streams, beautifulwaterfalls, dramatic cliff faces, wooden bridges and shady woodland trails.
To extend your walk you could head west along the canal to Burscough and visit the lovely Martin Mere Nature Reserve. You could also climb to the nearby Ashurst Beacon and enjoy more nice views to the coast. View Full Details>>
Parlick and Fair Snape Fell4 miles (7 km)This walk from Parlick Fell to Fair Snape Fell is considered one of the loveliest in the Forest of Bowland. The walk takes place on a very good footpath with wonderful views over the surrounding countryside.
The walk starts at the parking area on Startifants Lane and climbs to Parlick Fell. You continue north to Fair Snape, passing Bindhurst Fell on the way. The summit stands at 520m (1,710ft) and commands wonderful views over Londridge Fell and Beacon Fell.
The walk can also be started from the nearby village of Chipping. It's located about 2 miles south east of Parlick Fell and is a great place to stop for refreshments.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could head to the nearby Beacon Fell Country Park for more wonderful views and woodland trails. View Full Details>>
Parys Mountain5 miles (8 km)This circular walk on the Isle of Anglesey visits the fascinating disused copper mines of Parys Mountain. The mountain was mined for copper ore in the earlyBronze Age and dominated the world's copper market during the 1780s, when the mine was the largest in Europe. The mines are an extraordinary sight, rich with various ores and minerals. The striking mixture of colours and shadows from the undulating hills are very picturesque. From the elevated position there are wonderful views of the Anglesey coast and countryside. There is also an old windmill and a number of pools/ponds.
The walk starts from the little village of Penysarn where there is a car park (You could also start from the car park at the northern end of the mountain on the B5111. This is shown on the street view link below).You then follow waymarked footpaths around the mountain with views towards Almwich Port to the north and the nearby Trysglwynwind farmto the south. A unique walk it is well worth bringing your camera to capture this extraordinary landscape.
Cyclists can reach the mountain by following the wonderful Copper Trail Cycle Route which is named after the mountain. View Full Details>>
Peckforton Castle and Peckforton Hills5 miles (8.5 km)Explore the Peckforton Castle Estate and the Peckforton Hills on this walk in Cheshire. The walk makes use of the Sandstone Trail to take you along woodland trails with great views of the surrounding Cheshire countryside from the elevated Sandstone Ridge. If you head north along the ridge you could also visit the ruins of the 13th century Beeston Castle. It's a short climb with fabulous views over the beautiful countryside of the Cheshire Plain.
If you were to head south along the trail you would soon come to Bickerton Hill and Maiden Castle where there are more great views and theIron Agehill fort of Maiden Castle. View Full Details>>
Pen Y Fan5 miles (8 km)Climb the highest peak in South Wales and southern Britain on this stunning walk in the Brecon Beacons National Park.
This is a challenging climb to the 2906 feet (886m) summit but the footpaths are generally very good for most of the walk.
You start at the car park at Pont ar Daf about 10 miles north of Merthyr Tydfil. The first stage passes through woodland and crosses Blaen Taf Fawr before ascending toward Bwlch Duwynt. You continue to Corn Du where there are fabulous views of the Neuadd Valley, Cantref Reservoir, Beacons Reservoir and Llwyn-on Reservoir. Shortly after you reach the summit of Pen Y Fan where you will find a former Bronze Age burial chamber. The views are fantastic with Sugar Loaf, the Bristol Channel,Carmarthen Bay,Swansea Bay, theGower Peninsula, the Black Mountains, theCambrian Mountains and Exmoor all visible on a clear day.
From the summit you descend to Corn Duand then on to the heather covered Y Gyrn. You soon come to a woodland area and the finish point at the car park.
The Brecon Beacons Way runs past the mountain so you could pick this up to continue your walk. Beacons Reservoir is also very near the start point to the walk so you could enjoy an easy waterside stroll here too. View Full Details>>
Pen y ghent6 miles (9 km)Climb to the 694m (2,277ft) summit of Pen y ghent on this challenging circular walk in the Yorkshire Dales. Pen y ghent is probably the most famous and popular of Yorkshire's famous three peaks. The others are Ingleborough and Whernside. This route is the classic ascent from Horton in Ribblesdale via Brackenbottom Scar.
You start in the village of Horton in Ribblesdale at the car park and follow country lanes towards Brackenbottom. You continue the ascent, picking up the Pennine Way just before reaching the summit. From here there are fabulous views across the Yorkshire Dales. The descent follows the Pennine Way passing Tarn Barn, Horton Scar and Hull Point - the largest natural hole in England.
The mountain is located close to the Malham Tarn Estate where you can enjoying cycling and walking trails around the beautiful glacial lake and try another challenging climb to Fountains Fell and Fountains Fell Tarn. View Full Details>>
Pendle Hill5 miles (7.5 km)This walk climbs to the summit of Pendle Hill in Lancashire. It starts in the village of Barley and makes use of the Pendle Way long distance footpath to take you on a circular tour of the area. It's a steep climb but the path is pretty well defined for most of the way. From the 557 metre (1,827ft) summit there are fabulous views over the Pennines to the east, the Bowland Fells to the northwest, and the West Pennine Moors to the south.
After leaving the summit you descend to Boar Clough before enjoying two waterside stretches along the Upper and Lower Ogden Reservoirs. The path then leads you back into Barley.
The area is famous for the Pendle Witch Trials. These took place in 1612 when twelve people from the area were charged with the murders of ten people by the use of witchcraft. Ten were subsequently found guilty and executed by hanging. View Full Details>>
Penshaw Monument1 miles (1.5 km)Climb Penshaw Hill and visit this iconic Sunderland landmark on this short walk. It's a popular spot with the impressive monument sitting in an elevated position with wonderful views over the surrounding countryside. You can park at the foot of the monument and follow the footpath up the hill to the high point. After taking in the views you can then explore the woodland trails in Penshaw wood where there are pretty bluebells,white ramsons and wood anemones in the spring.
The 70 foot high monument was built in 1846 and commemorates the 1st Earl of Durham. It appears on the badge of Sunderland Football Club and can be see for miles around.
To extend your walk you can visit the nearby Herrington Country Park. It's just to the south of the hill and includes cycling and walking trails with a boating lake, a nature pond and a sculpture trail.
The Great North Forest Heritage Trail crosses Penshaw Hill so you could also continue along this long distance trail. Head north and you can join the Weardale Way for a stroll along the River Wear. The riverside trail will take you to Chester-le-Street in one direction and to Sunderland Harbour in the other. View Full Details>>
Pillar from Wasdale Head7 miles (11.5 km)Climb to this prominent Lakeland Fell on this popular circular route. The mountain stands at 892metres (2,927feet) making it the eighth highest in the Lake District.On the walk you'll enjoy splendid views of the valleys ofEnnerdale and Wasdale.
The fell is typically climbed from Wasdale Head where there is a popular car park. From here you head north to the rushing water of Ritson's Force Waterfalls. You continue to Gatherstone Head, crossing Gatherstone Beck on the way. The ascent continues along the Black Sail Passbefore turning west to the Pillar summit via Looking Stead. The summit is wide and grassy with splendid views of most of the major Lakeland fells. You can also see Loweswater and Ennerdale Water. Nearby is Pillar Rock, considered one of the wonders of the Lake District. The striking rock is popular with rock climbers and located just to the north of the Pillar summit.
After taking in the fine views you descend to Scoat Fell. From here the full horseshoe of the Western Fells can be seen. The descent continues to Red Pike fell, passing Scoat Tarn before coming to Dore Head. The final section takes you around Dorehead Screes and along Mosedale Beck before returning to the Wasdale Head car park.
To continue your walking in the area you could climb to Scafell Pike. Scafell is the highest point in England and is often climbed from Wasdale Head.
Just to the north of Pillar is Ennerdale Forest where there are footpaths leading to the lovely Ennerdale Water. View Full Details>>
Pilot Hill2 miles (3.5 km)Climb to the highest point in Hampshire on this walk on the Berkshire/Hampshire border. The walk starts from the Inkpen Beacon car park about 2 miles north west of the hill. From here you pick up the Wayfarer's Walk and follow it past Walbury Hill and the pretty West Woodhay Down. At 297m (974ft) Walbury Hill is the highest point in Berkshire and South East England. At the summit you can enjoy more great views over the county and explore the Iron Age Hill fort of Walbury Camp.
The route continues to Pilot Hill where you pick up the Brenda Parker Way to take you to the Hampshire village of Faccombe. Here you can enjoy refreshments before returning to the car park the same way.
To extend your walk you can continue along the Brenda Parker Way to Faccombe Wood and St Mary Bourne. View Full Details>>
Plynlimon5 miles (8 km)Climb to the highest point in the Cambrian Mountains on this challenging circular walk in Ceredigion. There are wonderful views of the reservoirs, countryside and forests of mid-wales to enjoy.
The walk starts from the parking area on the A44 at Esteddfa Gurig. You then pass a farm and then through a gate marked 'All Walks' before beginning the ascent. The path takes you to the summit of Pen Pumlumon Fawr which stands at a height of 752 metres (2,467ft). Here you will find a trig point and magnificent views in all directions. You can then descend the same way or via Pen Y Drawsallt, to the west. View Full Details>>
Preseli Hills Golden Road6 miles (10 km)This splendid walking trail runs right along the spine of the Preseli Hills giving wonderful views of the area. On a clear day you can see Cardigan Bay, Snowdonia and even Ireland. You will also pass two quarries which are believed to have provided the stones for Stonehenge. The road is thought to date back to Neolithic times.
The walk starts at the Bwlch Gwynt car park on the B4329 and heads east following the trail past the northern end of the Pantmeanog Forest. Here you have the option to take a short detour south to Foel Cwmcerwyn, the highest point in the Presili Hills. You continue east to the Bronze Age burial cairn at Foel Feddau and then on to the rocky tor Carn Bica, which overlooks Bedd Arthur, a Neolithic ring of stones in the shape of an eye. The final section takes you past Foel Drygarn Iron Age fortress before finishing near Crymych. On the route you can look out for wildlife such as buzzard, red kite and wild ponies on the grassland. View Full Details>>
Rannerdale Knotts2 miles (4 km)Visit Rannerdale Knotts and Whiteless Pike on this circular walk in the beautiful Rannerdale valley. It's a small fell but its proximity to Buttermere and Crummock Water make it an attractive option for walkers. There's also good footpaths, fine views and a section throught the lovely bluebell valley.
You can start the walk from the small car park off the B5289, next to Crummock Water. Then head north through the bluebell valley. The area is managed by the National Trust and is a stunning sight in the spring months, when carpets of bluebells cover the hills. You then head east through High Rannerdale, passing along Squat Beck. Near Whiteless Breast you turn west and ascend to the 355m (1,165ft) summit of Rannerdale Knotts. It's a wonderful spot with views back down to Crummock Water and Buttermere Lake.
To extend your walking in the area you could try the Crummock Water and Buttermere walks. Both lakes have lovely waterside paths to try.
For a more challenging climb you could try the Grasmoor walk which starts from the nearby Rannerdale Bridge. View Full Details>>
Red Screes4 miles (6 km)This cirular route takes you up Red Screes fell in the Lake District National Park. The walk begins in the popular town of Ambleside and ascends to Scandale Fell and Scandale Pass along the Scandale Beck. From Scandale Pass you turn east to the summit of Red Screes. Here you will find cairns, a circular stone shelter and the pretty Red Screes tarn. There are magnificent views of Helvellyn, Dove Crag, Fairfield and over Deepdale Hause. To the west you can see the Coniston, Bowfell and Scafell fells. You descend passing Raven Crag to Snarker Moss where the ground can be quite boggy. You continue to Snarker Pike before reaching the Kirkstone Road which will take you back into Ambleside. View Full Details>>
Rhinog Fawr4 miles (7 km)Visit the Rhinogs range of mountains in the Snowdonia National Park and climb Rhinog Fawr on this challenging walk. You'll pass heatheryslopes, little streams, rocky outcrops and two small lakes on your way to the top.
The walk begins from the Lake Cwm Bychan car park a couple of miles north of Rhinog Fawr. You then follow the footpaths through a woodland area before climbing the Roman Steps. You'll pass the two pretty lakes of Llyn Morwynion and Llyn Du before coming to the 720m (2,360ft) summit of Rhinog Fawr. From here there are fabulous views over the surrounding peaks and lakes. The area is also a National Nature Reserve so look out for interesting flora and fauna including purple heather and wild goats. View Full Details>>
Ridge Walk Mam Tor to Lose Hill5 miles (8 km)Follow the Great Ridge from Mam Tor to Lose Hill on one of the most popular walks in the Peak District. Although the walk reaches a height of well over 1600ft, it is not as challenging as you might think because the start point for walk is already in an elevated position.
It's a very beautiful area with the views over the Peak District stunning for the duration of the route. You can see the Hope Valley, the Edale Valley and several of the prominent fells. The area is also geologically fascintating with several 320 million year old Carboniferousrocks.
Start the walk from the National Trust Mam Nick car park. It's located just to the south west of Mam Tor on the Sparrowpit Buxton A623.A6 Road. From here it's a short but steep climb to the 517m (1,696ft) summit of Mam Tor. The route then passes along the Great Ridge, descending to Hollins Cross before passing Back Tor and finishing on Lose Hill. It's about a 2.5 mile walk so 5 miles in total.
This ridge walk is located very close to both Edale and Castleton so you could start your walk from either of these popular Peak District villages.
To extend your walk you can visit the nearby Winnats Pass with its toweringlimestonepinnacles. You could also pick up the Pennine Way around Edale and climb towards Kinder Scout.
If you head west from the car park you can climb across Rushup Edge and visit Lord's Seatat 550m (1,804ft). View Full Details>>
Roseberry Topping2 miles (3 km)Climb to the summit of this distinctivehill near Guisborough and enjoy wonderful views across the beautiful North York Moors National Park. The summit has a symbolic half-cone shape and jaggedcliff, which has been likened to the MatterhorninSwitzerland. The area is managed by the National Trust so there are very good footpaths to take you to the summit.
The walk starts at the car park and heads along Roseberry Lane and through Newton Wood and Roseberry Common to the summit. There are wonderful views of the Cleveland plain and the Pennines on a clear day. From the summit you descend toward Newton Wood for another woodland section. Look out for roe deer and woodpeckers on this part of the walk.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could pick up the Cleveland Way and head east into Guisborough Forest and Walkway. You could also climb to Captain Cook's Monument for more wonderful views of the area.
Another similar climb can be found at Eston, Middlesbrough. From Eston Nab there are more splendid views over the moors to the coast. You can follow the Cleveland Way through Hutton Lowcross Woods to reach the nab. View Full Details>>
Rough Tor2 miles (3 km)This is a climb to the 1313ft (400m) summit of Rough Tor on Bodmin Moor. Rough Tor is the second highest point in Cornwall and a popular spot for walkers.
The walk starts from the car park at the end of Rough Tor Road which leads out of Camelford. You then climb across a wide slope of Access Land on the moor to the striking granite tor. There are super views from the summit over the moor and surrounding countryside. The area has a fascinating Neolithic and Bronze age history withnumerouscairnsand burial monuments in the vicinity. You can extend your walk easily by visiting the nearby Showery Tor and Brown Willy - the highest point on the moor. View Full Details>>
Roundway Hill3 miles (5.5 km)Visit this historically significant hill on this interesting walk in Devizes. The hill is the site of a famous Civil War battle where aRoyalistcavalry force underLord Wilmotwon a crushing victory over theParliamentarians in 1643. You'll also visit the iron age hillfort of Oliver's Castle and enjoy views of the Devizes White Horse and the surrounding Wiltshire countryside.
The walk starts from the Roundway Hill car park next to Oliver's Castle. You could also easily walk to the site from Devizes by following the Wessex Ridgeway north for about two miles. You can then follow a circular route around the site for about 4 miles. There's also the option of exploring the woodland of the Roundway Hill Covert with its 68 acres of broadleaf woodland.
This route is designed for walkers but the area is also good for mountain biking with trails running across Roundway Hill and the adjacent Beacon Hill.
To extend your walk you can continue along the Wessex Ridgeway towards Morgan's Hill where you can pick up the Wansdyke Path. It's located about two miles north east of the car park at the start of this walk.
You could also visit the nearby Cherhill White Horse which is also located near Morgan's Hill. View Full Details>>
Saddleworth Moor5 miles (8 km)Enjoy a walk across this atmospheric moor in the Peak District. You can start at the car park at Dovestone Reservoir and follow footpaths past Yeoman Hey Reservoir and Greenfield Reservoir. You then follow the Greenfield Brook to Raven Stones Brow with little waterfalls to enjoy on the way. After crossing the brook you then head up and across the moor. This is a challenging section with the moor reaching heights of around 1500ft. There are excellent views over the reservoirs to the surrounding Pennine Hills and some fascinating geological features to look out for on the way.
From the high point on the moor you descend to Dovestone Reservoir and enjoy a woodland and waterside section taking you back to the car park.
To extend your walk you can pick up the Oldham Way and follow it south over the Chew Hills to Chew Reservoir. You could also reach the moor from nearby Mossley train station by following the Oldham Way. View Full Details>>
Scafell Pike5 miles (8.2 km)Climb the highest mountain in England on this spectacular walk in the Lake District. Scafell pike stands at a height of 978 metres (3,209ft) between Eskdale and Wasdale, at the northern end of Wast Water. The route below is the shortest, most direct way to the summit. It starts from the car park in Wasdale Head village and heads to Lingmell Gill, Lingmell Scars and Hollow Stones before finishing at the highest point where you will find an Ordnance Survey triangulation column beside a huge cairn. The views are stunning with the coast, the Isle of Man and Snowdonia all visible on a clear day.
For a different, more scenic route to the summit you can try the Scafell Pike from Borrowdale route. This longer route takes you around Styhead Tarn and along the famous Corridor Route. The Scafell Pike from Langdale route is another popular route. It is a longer and more challenging climb, but with some wonderful views of the Langdale Valley and a visit to Angle Tarn.
Another great climb also starts from Wasdale Head. The circular climb to Pillar is a splendid walk taking you to the eighth highest point in the Lake District. View Full Details>>
Scafell Pike from Borrowdale9 miles (14.5 km)This walk takes you to the highest mountain in England along one of the most popular and scenic routes to the summit. The challenging climb from Seathwaite in beautiful Borrowdale takes in Styhead Gill, Styhead Tarn and the famous Corridor Route.
The route starts in the little hamlet of Seathwaite a few miles north of the mountain. There's lots of roadside parking although it can get busy in the summer months. From here you pick up the footpath to Stockley Bridge along the pretty gill and then turn right towards Taylorgill Force waterfall. The path ascends along the running waters of Styhead Gill before coming to the lovely Styhead Tarn. You continue around Sty Head and Spout Head heading along the Corridor Route on a series of stone steps. The route takes you along the western flank of the Scafell massif with wonderful views of the fell. The final steep section takes you around Lingmell Col to the summit. Take a while to rest and enjoy the fabulous panoramic views of the Lakeland Fells before descending the same way.
An alternative route is to continue along Grains Gill from Stockley Bridge. The path continues along Ruddy Gill, passing Sprinkling Tarn before rounding Great End and ascending to Scaffel Pike from the eastern side.
To climb to the summit the most direct way try the Scafell Pike From Wasdale route. For a longer more challenging walk try the Scafell Pike from Langdale route. This route involves a fair amount of scrambling but with some wonderful views of the Langdale Valley and a visit to Angle Tarn. View Full Details>>
Scafell Pike from Langdale12 miles (19.5 km)This is one of the longer and more challenging routes to the top of England's highest mountain. There's several challenging sections with steep scrambles so this route is only really suitable for more experienced hikers. Along the way you are rewarded with spectacular views of the Langdale Valley and Langdale Pikes.
The walk starts from the New Dungeon Ghyll Hotel in Langdale, following a section of the Cumbria Way along Langdale Fell and Mickleden Beck, to Angle Tarn. This section also passes the beautiful Rossett Gill waterfall.
From the tarn you continue past Esk Hause to Ill Crag, before the final section takes you onto the Scafell Summit. Please note that a fair amount of scrambling is required from Esk Hause to the Scafell summit. From here views are stunning with the coast, the Isle of Man and Snowdonia all visible on a clear day.
Look out for birds of prey including buzzards and kestrels as you make your way along the route.
For an alternative route to the summit you can try the Scafell Pike from Borrowdale walk. This route takes you around Styhead Tarn and along the famous Corridor Route.
For the most direct route to the summit try the Scafell Pike From Wasdale walk.
To extend your walking in the area you can climb to the Langdale Pikes. The route also starts from New Dungeon Ghyll.
The climbs to Crinkle Crags, Bowfell and Dungeon Ghyll are also nearby. View Full Details>>
Scout Scar2 miles (3 km)Enjoy a short but steep climb to a wonderful viewpoint near Kendal. There's a good footpath leading up to the viewpoint where you can see the Coniston Old Man, Bowfell and the Langdale Pikes. It's a geologically fascinating area withcarboniferous limestone and steep slopes to admire.
There is a car park on Underbarrow Road just to the north west of the hill. You can follow the road from Kendal to the site. It's about 2 miles west of the town centre. From here you can pick up the footpaths to take you up to Scout Scar and along Barrowfield Wood. At the 235m (775ft) summit you will find a structure known as 'The Mushroom'. This shelter has a view finder (toposcope) showing all the fells you can see from the viewpoint.
You can explore the area further by visiting Cunswick Scar and Helsington Barrows as shown in the video below. The longer circular walk starts in Kendal and visits the Lake District's outlying fells as described by Alfred Wainright in the first chapter of his book on the area.
If you continue south from this route you will soon come to Sizergh Castle. The 1,600-acres estate includes miles of great walking trails through limestone pasture, orchards and Brigsteer Woods. View Full Details>>
Scrabo Tower1 miles (1 km)Scrabo Hill and country park is located near Newtownards in County Down, Northern Ireland. You can follow footpaths to the top of the hill where you will find the well known landmark Scrabo Tower. The 19th century tower is 125 feet (38m) high and visible for miles around. The views from the summit of Scrabo Hill extend toStrangford Lough, the Mourne Mountains and the Scottish coast. You can pick up the footpath from the car park. It's a short climb of less than half a mile but quite steep.
After descending the hill you can continue to explore Scrabo Country Park. There are nice woodland trails through Killynether Woods with lots of bluebells in the springtime.
To extend your walking in the area you pick up the Comber Greenway from nearby Comber. This cycling and walking trail runs along National Cycle Network route 99 and a disused railway line from Belfast to Comber. View Full Details>>
Seat Sandal4 miles (6.5 km)This circular walk climbs to Seat Sandal fell near Grasmere in the Lake District National Park. You can start the walk from the layby parking just off the A591 at Mill Bridge. Head north from layby, crossing Tongue Gill before picking up the footpaths heading north east. The first section follows Wainwright's Coast to Coast along Tongue Gill to the Farfield Iron Mine. The route continues al the C2C to Grisedale Hause where you turn south west towards the Seat Sandal summit. From the 736m (2,415ft) summit you can see the Helvellyn and Fairfield ranges, the Solway Firth, the Scottish mountains and Morecambe Bay to the south. After taking in the views you descend back to the start point on the western side of Great Tongue. You could also descend on a section of the C2C via Little Tongue Gill.
To extend your walk you can continue along the C2C to Grisedale Tarn which is just to the north of Seat Sandal. The path will eventually lead you to St Sunday Crag where there's great views over Ullswater.
The fell is also very close to the route for the Fairfield Horseshoe which is another popular climb in the area. View Full Details>>
Shaftoe Crags2 miles (3 km)Climb to Shaftoe Crags and enjoy far ranging views over the Northumberland countryside on this walk near Morpeth. The area is geologically significant with a number of interesting rock formations including the Devil's Punchbowl. The crags reach a height of nearly 700ft. From this elevated position the views over the surrounding area are magnificent.
The crags are located just west of Bolam Lake Country Park so you could continue your walking here. You could also start the walk from the country park and cross the moorland to the crags. View Full Details>>
Sharpenhoe Clappers3 miles (5 km)Visit this classic chalk escarpment in the Chilterns and enjoy wonderful views across this beautiful area. This circular walk makes use of the John Bunyan Trail and the Icknield Way Path to take you on a tour of the Sharpenhoe Clappers and the Smithcombe Hills. There's a degree of climbing involved with the route hitting a peak of just over 500ft at the high points.
You can park at the Sharpenhoe Clappers car park on Sharpenhoe Road to start your walk. Then head north towards the Iron Age Hill Fort and beech wood which sits atop the area. In the summer months the chalk grasslands are covered in pretty wildflowers which attract a variety of butterflies. Look out for orchids, primroses and an uncommon rose,Rosa stylosa, found in scrub areas.
After exploring the hill fort you can head south through the Smithcombe Valley along the Icknield Way Path. You'll pass Smithcombe hill as you make your way to the village of Streatley. From Streatley you pick up the John Bunyan Trail to take you back to the car park.
There's lots of good options for extending your walking in the area. Just to the east is the lovely Barton Hills National Nature Reserve where there's lots more interesting flora and fauna to see. Just to the west if Sundon Hills Country Park with lots more walking trails and great views to enjoy. View Full Details>>
Shining Tor and Cats Tor6 miles (10 km)Climb to the highest point in Cheshire on this wonderful walk in the Goyt Valley.
The walk starts from the Erwood Hall Car Park at the southern end of Erwood Reservoir. The route then ascends to Shining Tor, passing the Errwood Estate with its old ruined hall and attractive woodland. The hall was built in the 1830s by Samuel Grimshawe with a 2000 acre estate consisting of farmland and woodland with azaleasandrhododendrons. You can see the Grimshawe's family cemetery and an attractive Spanish Shrine to the governess of the children at Errwood Hall. The estate is a popular start point for walks in the Goyt Valley.
At the 559m (1,834ft) summit of Shining Tor you can enjoy great views of the Cheshire Plain, Winter Hill, the city ofManchester and Jodrell Bank. On a clear day you can also see as far as Snowdonia.
The route then heads north along the ridge to Cats Tor and then on to Pym Chair. It's a lovely stretch of the walk with a good path leading along the ridge with views of Cats Tor and the surrounding Peak District hills and moorland. Pym Chair is another popular viewpoint with a car park. You could also start the walk from here if you prefer.
From Pym chair you descend back to Errwood Reservoir along a nice country lane before a final waterside section leads you back to the Errwood Hall car park.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area then you could pick up the Midshires Way which runs past the reservoir. You could actually start the walk from nearby Buxton and follow the Midshires Way to Shining Tor from there. The Errwood Reservoir and Fernilee Reservoir Walk also starts from the same location.
If you head north from Pym Chair then you would soon come to Windgather Rocks, a popular place for rock climbers. View Full Details>>
Shutlingsloe3 miles (5 km)Enjoy fabulous views over Cheshire on this climb to Shutlingsloe Hill in the Peak District. The walk starts from the Trentabank Reservoir car park and follows a footpath through Macclesfield Forest to Shutlingsloe, passing Nessit Hill on the way. There is quite a steep path to the506m (1,660ft) summit but you will be rewarded with splendid views of the surrounding Peak District scenery. You can return on the same path or descend to Wildboarclough and return on country lanes to make it a circular walk.
Highlights on the walk include nice woodland trails through the conifer forest and views over Trentabank Reservoir with its heronry and interesting plantlife.
It's easy to extend your walking in this lovely area. You could head west from the car park to Ridegate Reservoir and pick up the Gritstone Trail and follow it to the excellent Tegg's Nose Country Park. View Full Details>>
Silver How2 miles (3 km)This is a fairly easy climb to Silver How fell in the Lake District. It's a short circular walk starting in Grasmere and a nice one to try if you're looking for an introduction to fell walking. The walk passes the National Trust owned Allan Bank, the former home of William Wordsworth. It's a lovely place to stop for a drink or go for a stroll in the pretty garden. From the Silver How summit there are super views of Grasmere village and lake. Many of the famous fells are also visible such as Helm Crag, Steel Fell, Heron Pike and Fairfield. The walk descends from the summit with a woodland section taking you back to Grasmere.
If you enjoy this walk then there are some similar ones to try starting in Grasmere. For example you could climb the nearby Helm Crag or visit the pretty Easedale Tarn. Both walks are similar in length and are also fairly easy climbs. View Full Details>>
Simonside Hills7 miles (11 km)The Simonside Hills are a fabulous place for walkers with miles of footpaths taking you through woodland and moorland to wonderful viewpoints. You'll pass interesting rock formations, rocky outcrops and acres of forest as you make your way through this wildly beautiful area of the Northumberland National Park.
This circular walk starts at the parking area in Rothbury Forest and climbs to the 430m high Simonside Hill. From here there are wonderful views of the Cheviots, the River Coquet, Cragside Country Park and the Northumbrian coastline. You descend towards Harwood Forest before picking up the St Oswald's Way to return you to the car park.
It's easy to continue your walking in the area by heading to the wonderful Cragside Country Park which is located just a few miles away. You could also continue along the St Oswald's Way deeper into Harwood Forest. View Full Details>>
Skiddaw13 miles (21 km)This challenging walk guides you up Skiddaw in the Lake District. Skiddaw is the 4th highest mountain in England and is a popular climb with hill walkers. This route makes use of the Allerdale Ramble way-marked walking trail so is well defined and easy to follow.
The route begins from the town of Keswick at the northern end of the beautiful Derwent Water. You then head to Millbeck and onto the summit where you will find cairnsand a number of stone windshelters. The views are magnificent - you can seetheCheviots, North Pennines, Yorkshire Dales, Forest of Bowland and the Isle of Arran on a clear day. You then descend to Longside Edge and Ullock Pike before a woodland stretch through Thornthwaite Forest takes you to the River Derwent. You then follow the lovely riverside path back into Keswick.
The walk can be extended by heading into Dodd Wood near Millbeck. The Allerdale Ramble passes through the wood where you can climb to Dodd Fell summit for great views over Bassenthwaite Lake. View Full Details>>
Skirrid Fawr9 miles (14.5 km)Climb this 486m (1594 feet) mountain in the Brecon Beacons on this challenging walk. Skirrid Fawr (or Ysgyryd Fawr) forms part of the Black Mountains range.
The walk starts in Abergavenny, next to the tourist information centre and follows the Marches Way long distance trail to the summit. Here you will find the ruins of aniron–agehill fortand St Michael's medievalRoman Catholic church. There are splendid views across the Brecon Beacons, Black Mountains, Abergavenny and the surrounding countryside.
The walk descends through woodland areas before rejoining the Marches Way and returning to Abergavenny.
If you'd like to climb another black mountain then the iconic Sugarloaf is also near Abergavenny. The Brecon Beacons Way also runs through the area so you could pick this up to continue your walk. View Full Details>>
Slemish Mountain1 miles (1.5 km)Follow the Slemish Path to the 1437 ft summit of this mountain in County Antrim. The challenging path starts from the car park near Broughshane and climbs steeply to the summit. Here you are rewarded with fine views over Antrim, the Scottish coast, Ballymena town, Lough Neagh and the Sperrin Mountains. View Full Details>>
Slieve Donard5 miles (8 km)Climb to the highest peak in Northern Ireland on this challenging walk in the Mourne Mountains. It's a beautiful area with a waterside section along the Glen River a real highlight of the walk. The river has rocky pools, pretty waterfalls and surrounded by attractive woodland. The climb to the summit passes along the Mourne Wall which runs for 22 miles over 15 mountains. It was constructed in the early part of the 20th century.
The walk starts from the attractive coastal town of Newcastle in County Down. After leaving the car park in Donard Park the route heads through the Scots Pine and Oak of Donard Forest. You'll follow the lovely Glen River Path to the Mourne Wall where you turn left to reach the 850m (2,789 ft) summit. From here the views are spectacular with Newcastle Beach, the Isle of Man, Scotland and Wales all visible on a clear day. Also at the summit you will find a small stone tower and two prehistoric burialcairns.
If you would like to extend your walking in the area then you could visit the nearby Tollymore Forest Park with its riverside walks and waymarked, woodland walking trails.
Also nearby is the splendid Murlough Bay National Nature Reserve where there is a beautiful sand dune system, woodland trails and a wonderful beach. View Full Details>>
Snaefell2 miles (3 km)Climb to the peak of the highest mountain on the Isle of Man on this short climb from the Bungalow station. It's about a one mile climb from the station which is on the excellent Snaefell Mountain Railway. Catch the railway from the town of Laxey then alight at Bungalow to climb the rest of the way. You can also drive to the Bungalow car park and start the walk from there. The trail has sections of gravel, slate stones, grass and rock. It's a short path but quite steep near the summit.
From the 2,037 feet (620.9m) high summit it is said you can see the sixkingdoms of theIsle of Man,England,Ireland,Scotland,WalesandHeaven. A plaquepoints out the directions oflandmarksand their distances from the summit.
At Laxey you can pick up the Isle of Man Coastal Path to extend your walk. View Full Details>>
Snake Pass8 miles (13.5 km)This circular walk explores the area around the Snake Pass with great views of the Pennines. It's an interesting area with some nice woodland trails, lots of pretty streams and fabulous views from the high points. It's a fairly challenging walk, reaching a height of nearly 1800ft at Mill Hill.
The walk starts in the Lady Clough Woods car park just off the Roman Road. Also known as Snake Woods this attractive conifer plantation climbs the steep slopes on either side of the clough. You follow the woodland trails south to Saukin Ridge where you pick up the Snake Path. This stony footpath runs west along Black Ashop Moor to Ashop Clough and Ashop Head. There's nice streams and pretty heather to look out for on this section. At Ashop Head you have the option of picking up the Pennine Way and following it south east towards the magnificent Kinder Scout. You could also head due south and visit Kinder Reservoir. This route turns north east along the Pennine Way towards Featherbed Moss, an area of peat bog with a number of flagstones to cross. You then cross the road and head towards Crooked Clough and Doctor's Gate before turning south and returning to the woods.
Other walks around the Snake Pass include Alport Castles and Derwent Reservoir. These are located just to the east of the pass. Alport Castles is only about a mile away from the start point for this walk. Here you will find spectacular formation of rocks formed from numerous landslides over a period of time. Footpaths from here can take you on to the reservoir where there is some lovely scenery and waterside paths.
Following the Pennine Way North from the road will soon take you to Bleaklow. From the Bleaklow Head summit there are wonderful views across GreaterManchester,Lancashire, Cheshire, theHope Valley,Holme Moss,Emley MoorandYorkshire. View Full Details>>
Snowdon Horseshoe7 miles (12 km)This classic circular walk to the Snowdon summit is a favourite for many. The 7 mile challenge is considered one of the finest ridge walks in the country. It is a very challenging circuit with knife edge sections along Crib Goch, where great care should be taken, particularly on windy days.
The walk starts from the Pen-y-pass car park at the top of the Llanberis Pass off the A4086 road. From here you pick up the Snowdon Pyg Track and head west towards Bwlch Y Moch. You continue west to the exhilarating section along Crib Goch. The high point stands at 923 metres (3,028ft) above sea level. It involves a fair degree of scrambling and a challenging knife edge ridge so take your time! After tackling three rock-pinnacles you will arrive at the grassy col at Bwlch Coch. From here there are great views to Llyn Glas, Y Lliwedd's twin peaks and the Snowdon peak.
The next section climbs to Garnedd Ugain mountain, the second highest peak in Wales, lying just under one kilometre north of the summit of Snowdon itself. The route continues to the Finger Stone on Bwlch Glas, marking the top of the Pyg Track and Miners Track. Soon after you reach the summit of Snowdon where you can enjoy views as far as the Isle of Man, the Peak District, the Lake District and Ireland. A brass plaque shows all the surrounding mountains of Snowdonia you can see.
The route then steeply descends to Bwlch Cileau and Y Lliwedd using part of the Watkin Path. You continue the descent to Lliwedd Bach and then on to Llyn Llydaw. There are nice views here back to Crib Goch where you can see walkers tackling the same challenging ridge you have already completed!
Then next section passes along the shores of the pretty lake before following part of the Snowdon Miners Track to the much smaller Llyn Teyrn. From here it is a short stroll back to the car park and the end of the route.
There are lots of other routes up to the mountain summit to try. These include the Snowdon Llanberis Path, Miners Track, Pyg Track, Ranger Path and the Rhyd Ddu Path. View Full Details>>
Snowdon Llanberis Path9 miles (14.5 km)Climb to the summit of the highest mountain in Wales on this challenging walk. The Llanberis Path is the longest of the six routes to the top of Snowdon but because of it's gradual elevation it is generally considered the easiest route to the summit. It's very popular with leisure walkers as it runs parallel with the Snowdon Mountain railway which starts at Llanberis. As such you can use the railway to take you up (or down) part of the route.
The path starts in Llanberis near to the Royal Victoria Hotel and climbs towards Hebron Station with great views back towards Dinorwig Slate Quarry and Elidir Fawr. You continue to Halfway House, with wonderful views of Moel Cynghorion, Foel Goch, Foel Gron, Moel Eilio and the Cwm Brwynog valley. At Halfway House you can purchase refreshments in the summer months. The next stage ascends towards Cwm Glas Bach with views of the Llyn Du'r Arddu lake. The final section takes you from Bwlch Glas to the summit where there are magnificent views over Snowdonia, Ireland, the Isle of Man, the Peak District and the Lake District.
If you're looking for more challenging climbs to the summit you could try the Snowdon Miners Track or the Snowdon Pyg Track. The peak can also be reached by following a longer trail to Moel Eilio Foel Gron and Foel Goch.
For an exhilarating circular ridge walk, taking in the Crib Goch ridge, try the Snowdon Horseshoe. View Full Details>>
Snowdon Miners Track8 miles (13 km)This route follows the Miners Track to the summit of the highest mountain in Wales. It is a slightly longer route than the alternative Pyg Track but has the advantage of waterside sections alongside the mountain's three beautiful lakes of Llyn Teyrn, Llyn Llydaw and Glaslyn.
The walk begins in the Pen y Pass car park and ascends to the pretty Llyn Teyrn before coming to the much larger Llyn Llydaw. The path crosses the lake and then runs right along it's northern edge, making for a lovely waterside section. At the lake you'll also pass the ruins of the old Britannia Copper Mine crushing mill.
You continue along a steep section to Llyn Glaslynand then Bwlch Glas where you can see the tracks of the Snowdon Mountain Railway. The final section takes you from Bwlch Glas to the Snowdon summit where there are magnificent views over Snowdonia, Ireland, the Isle of Man, the Peak District and the Lake District.
The Pyg Track starts from the same car park. It is a shorter route but has more challenging rocky sections.
For an exhilarating circular ridge walk, taking in the Crib Goch ridge, try the Snowdon Horseshoe. View Full Details>>
Snowdon Pyg Track7 miles (11 km)Climb to the summit of Snowdon on this challenging walk in the Snowdonia National Park. Snowdonis the highest mountain inWales, and the third highest in Britain, standing at a height of 1,085 metres (3,560ft). The Pyg Track is one of six paths to the Snowdon summit. It is generally regarded as the most challenging as it crosses some rough and rocky terrain.
The walk begins in the Pen y Pass car park and ascends to Bwlch y Moch. You continue past the beautiful glacial lakes of Llyn Llydaw and Glaslyn on your way to Bwlch Glas where you can see the tracks of the Snowdon Mountain Railway. The final section takes you from Bwlch Glas to the summit where there are magnificent views over Snowdonia, Ireland, the Isle of Man, the Peak District and the Lake District.
The Snowdon Miners Track also starts from the same car park and has the advantage of waterside sections along the mountain's three beautiful lakes of Llyn Teyrn, Llyn Llydaw and Glaslyn.
There's also the Snowdon Ranger Path,Snowdon Llanberis Path and the Snowdon Rhyd Ddu Path to try.
For an exhilarating circular ridge walk, taking in the Crib Goch ridge, try the Snowdon Horseshoe. View Full Details>>
Snowdon Ranger Path8 miles (13 km)Climb to the summit of Snowdon on the ranger path on this challenging walk in the Snowdonia National Park. You can start your walk from the National Park car park next to Llyn Cwellyn and the Snowdon Ranger railway station. From here you can pick up the path, heading east away from the lake. It's generally a good track with rockier sections as you approach the summit. It runs for nearly 4 miles with wonderful views over the surrounding mountains and the numerous beautiful lakes. The route actually passes very close to Llyn Ffynnon-y-gwas and Llyn Du r Arddu as you approach the summit. You will also pass Clogwyn Du'r Arddu, considered to be one of the best climbing cliffs inBritain.Here there are magnificent views of the Llechog ridge and Cwm Clogwyn with the lakes of Llyn Glas, Llyn Coch and Llyn Nadroedd. (Blue Lake, Red Lake and Snakes' Lake). From the Snowdon summit the views are also impressive with 18 lakes and 14 peaks visible. On a clear day you can see as far as Ireland, the Isle of Man and the Lake District.
The ranger path is one of several routes to the summit. You can also try the Llanberis Path, Miners Track, Pyg Track and the Rhyd Ddu Path.
For an exhilarating circular ridge walk, taking in the Crib Goch ridge, try the Snowdon Horseshoe.
You can virtually climb the mountain using the google street view link below! View Full Details>>
Snowdon Rhyd Ddu Path7 miles (12 km)The Rhyd Ddu Path is one of the six main routes to the summit of the highest mountain in Wales. It is considered to be one of the quietest and most beautiful, though there are some challenging sections where care should be taken.
The path begins in the car park in the village of Rhyd Ddu and ascends to Pen ar Lon, Rhos Boeth and Llechog, before reaching the 1,085 metres (3,560ft) summit. On the asent you will enjoy magnificent views of Llyn y Gadair and Llyn Cwellyn lakes, and the summits of Moel Hebog, Moel yr Ogof, Moel Lefn, Mynydd Drws y Coed and Mynydd Mawr. From the Snowdon summit there are views over Snowdonia, Ireland, the Isle of Man, the Peak District and the Lake District.
For an exhilarating circular ridge walk, taking in the Crib Goch ridge, try the Snowdon Horseshoe. View Full Details>>
Snowdon Watkin Path7 miles (12 km)The Watkin Path to the Snowdon summit is considered to be the most challenging of the available routes as it starts from the lowest elevation. It is, however, very pretty with attractive woodland and waterfalls near the start.
You can start your walk from the good sized Nant Gwynant car park off the A498. Then head if you head south over the Afon Glaslyn you will soon come to the start of the Watkin path on your right. You head north along the path, passing through woodland before a waterside stretch along the Afon Cwm Llan. You'll pass some lovely waterfalls before coming to the Gladstone Rock. The rock is dedicated to the Prime Minister William Gladstone, who opened the path in 1892.
The path continues north from the rock with great views over the Glaslyn estuary and Llyn Glaslyn lake below. The next section from Bwlch y Saethau is quite challenging with a very steep incline and loose stones. Shortly after you reach the summit where you are rewarded with magnificent views towards Ireland, the Isle of Man and the Lake District.
There's several other routes across Snowdon to try. If you would like to do a circular walk then the Snowdon Horseshoe is a good option.
For a longer but less demanding climb try the Llanberis Path.
The beautiful Llyn Gwynant and Llyn Dinas are also very close to the start of this route. You could visit these two lovely lakes from the same car park.
You can virtually climb to the summit using the google street view link below! View Full Details>>
St Catherine's Hill Christchurch2 miles (2.5 km)This hill to the north of Christchurch stands at53-metres (174ft). A climb to the top is rewarded with super views of the surrounding countryside and the River Avon with the coast and the Isle of Wight beyond. As well as the great views the area is covered with attractive heathland and coniferous forest to explore. There's also an abundance of wildlife with Dartford Warbler, Sand Lizard, Smooth Snake, Adder, Nightjar, Hobby, Grayling,Silver-studded Blue, Scarce Chaser and White-legged Damselfly to look out for.
It's also easy to extend your walk by picking up a footpath north to Town Common and Blackwater Hill where there are great views over the River Stour. Just beyond Blackwater Hill is the Sopley Common Nature Reserve. Here you'll find dry heathland, covered with purple heather, and a variety of wildlife including lizards & smooth snakes, heath grasshoppers, wood tiger beetle & grayling butterfly. All in all St Catherine's Hill and the area around it makes for a splendid long or short walk.
To extend your walk you could visit Christchurch Harbour and Hengistbury Head where there are more great views of the area. View Full Details>>
St Catherine's Hill Winchester1 miles (1.5 km)Climb this small hill in Winchester for fine views over the town, the River Itchen and the surrounding countryside of the South Downs. It's a very pretty area with the chalk downlandcovered in wild flowers including bird's-foot trefoil, saladburnet, dropwort and several types of orchid. This attracts 25 different types of butterfly such as marbled white,chalkhillblue and brownargus. There are also the ramparts of anIron Agehill fort, a 17th/18th century mizmaze and a copse of beech trees containing the site of a 12th century chapel.
There is a car park just north of the hill where you can pick up the footpaths to the hill. You could also walk from the centre of town which is only about a mile away. If you're coming by bike then National Cycle Network route 23 runs right past the hill along the river.
To turn this into a longer circular walk descend the hill and head south along the River Itchen to St Cross Bridge. Cross the bridge and then return on the other side of the river to Winchester College and the town.
If you'd like to extend your walk then you could pick up the Itchen Way and enjoy a stroll along the River Itchen. If you were to head north along the trail you would soon come to the lovely Winnal Moors Nature Reserve. Here you will find nice footpaths taking you to chalk stream,tall fen,hay meadowandwet pasture, with a wide variety of wildlife to look out for. View Full Details>>
St Martha's Hill2 miles (3 km)This circular walk visits the lovely St Martha's Hill in the North Downs, near Guildford. From the high points there are tremendous views of the Surrey Hills and Newlands Corner.
The walk starts from the St Martha's Hill, Guildford Lane Car Park, just east of the hill. You then follow the North Downs Way to the high point and the 19th century church of St Martha's. The hill summit stands at574 feet (175m) and commands wonderful views of the surrounding area. There are also a number of nice woodland trails, attractive grassland and a number of interesting plants.
If you'd like to extend your walk then you could visit the nearby Newlands Corner for more great views and woodland footpaths.
Just to the west is Chantry Wood where there are some more nice woodland trails and meadows to explore.
Footpaths leading south from the hill will take you to Blackheath Common where there's nice footpaths and cycle trails to follow through the attractive heathland and woodland. View Full Details>>
St Sunday Crag8 miles (13 km)This challenging walk from Patterdale climbs to this prominentfellon the north-eastern ridge of Fairfield. The circular walk climbs to Birks Fell and then onto the 841m (2,759ft) of St Sunday Crag. There's fabulous views of the Helvellyn range, High Street and the lake below.
The walk takes place on generally good footpaths on a splendid elevated ridge.
You can start your walk from the pretty village of Patterdale at the southern end of Ullswater Lake. Then follow the trail south west out of the village to Birks Fell before climbing across St Sunday Crag. You then descend to the pretty Grisedale Tarn before turning round and returning to Patterdale via Grisedale Forest and Patterdale Common.
To extend your walking in the area you could visit the lovely Aira Force Waterfall. The long distance Ullswater Way will take you on a tour of the area surrounding the lake.
Wainwright's Coast to Coast runs through the area so you could continue along the path past Grisedale Tarn towards Seat Sandal where there are more splendid views. View Full Details>>
Stanage Edge10 miles (16.5 km)Climb to the stunning gritstoneescarpment of Stanage Edge and then on to High Neb on this popular walk in the Peak District.
The walk begins in the village of Hathersage and follows footpaths over the Hodd Brook to Cliff Wood. You climb towards Hurst Clough and North Lees before coming to Stanage Edge. The route then passes along the top of the rocky edge where you are likely to pass rock climbers on your way to the high point at High Neb. Here you can enjoy wonderful views over Hallam Moors and the Hope Valley.
You then return from High Neb along the edge to White Path Moss passing Robin Hood's cave on the way. You continue east to Upper Burbage Bridge where you turn south to Higger Tor for more wonderful views over the Peak District. You then descend back to Hathersage on country lanes and footpaths, passing Toothill Farm on the way.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area then you could pick up the Derwent Valley Heritage Way which runs through Hathersage along the River Derwent.
You could also head east and visit Stanedge Pole. The pole stands at a height of 438 metres (1,437 feet) and marks the border between Derbyshire and South Yorkshire.If you descend from the pole in a north easterly direction you will come to Redmires Reservoir. These three pretty reservoirs have a good circular walking trail to follow.
Just to the west there is another similarly exciting ridge walk across Bamford Edge. Beyond that is another splendid climb to Win Hill which has some of the best views in the area.
If you head north you can enjoy a waterside walk along the beautiful Ladybower Reservoir, before a climb to the terrific Derwent Edge. View Full Details>>
Stinchcombe Hill1 miles (2 km)This walk climbs to the lovely viewpoint at Stinchcombe Hill in the Cotswolds. The hill is located just to the west of Dursley so you could start your walk from there and follow the Cotswold Way to the hill. This circular walk, however, starts from the car park about half a mile east of the hill. You follow the Cotswold Way to the hill summit where you will find a topograph displaying all the landmarks you can see from the peak. It's a lovely view with the Tyndale Monument and the village of North Nibley visible across the attractive countryside and woodland below. You can also see the Vale of theRiver SevernandForest of Deanfrom the 219 metres (719ft) Drakestone Point.
The public footpaths pass Stinchcombe golf course so please keep to the signposted paths only.
After descending back to the car park you have the option of extending your walk along the Cotswold Way. You can follow it through the series of woods on the outskirts of Dursley. This includes Sheep Path Woods, Cockshott Woods and Hermitage Woods. If you continue south along the path you can visit the Tynedale Monument view point and the town of Wotton-under-Edge. View Full Details>>
Stiperstones9 miles (15 km)The area around this Shropshire Hill is fantastic for walking and cycling. This walk takes you to the 536m (1,759ft) Stiperstones summit where you can enjoy fabulous views of the area.
The Stiperstones is a 6 mile/10km ridge covered with craggy rock outcrops and gorgeous heather heathland. The area is also a National Nature Reserve with a diverse range of flora and fauna. Look out for red grouse,Eurasian curlew,peregrine falconand the rarering ouzel as you make your way across the hills.
This walk begins in Habberley taking you through woodland to the Stiperstones ridge. You head along the ridge passing the quartzitetorsthat Stiperstones is famous for. These include Shepherd's Rock, the Devil's Chair and Manstone Rock. Manstone is the highest at 536 metres (1,759ft) and commands fabulous views over the Shropshire Hills, the Long Mynd and Wales. From here you return to Habberley on different tracks, passing through a series of wooded areas as you go.
If you'd like to continue your climbing in the area then you could head to the nearby Caer Caradoc and the stunning Long Mynd. This route also makes use of the Shropshire Way so you could continue along this path to the Bog Mine Visitor Centre where you'll find historical information about the area and two circular walks. View Full Details>>
Stoodley Pike7 miles (11 km)This circular walk takes you to the Stoodley Pike monument from Todmorden. It makes use of the Calderdale Way and the Pennine Way to take you to the monument before returning to Todmorden along the Rochdale Canal.
The walk starts in Todmorden near the train station. You then follow the Calderdale Way to the little village of Lumbutts where you will find an old church, a mill house and pretty cottages. The walk continues past the Heeley Dam reservoir to Withens Gate where you pick up the Pennine Way. This takes you across Higher Moor to the Stoodley Pike summit. Here you will find the impressive monument, built in 1856 at the end of theCrimean War. You can climb the stairs of the monument to a viewing platform and enjoy wonderful views over Calderdale.
From the summit you descend to the Rochdale Canal where a long waterside section leads back to Todmorden. It's a lovely section of the canal with old bridges, mills and locks. The surrounding hills and countryside make a splendid backdrop.
You can also reach the hill from nearby Hebden Bridge by following the Pennine Bridleway.
If you'd like to extend your walk then you could follow Pennine Way the to the nearby Withens Clough Reservoir. There is a nice waterside footpath with good views of the surrounding moorland and back to the monument. View Full Details>>
Sugarloaf Mountain5 miles (8 km)Climb to the summit of this iconic mountain on this challenging walk in Monmouthshire, Wales. Sugarloaf is part of the Black Mountains range and stands at a height of 1,955 feet (596metres).
The walk starts at the car park to the south of the summit near the town of Abergavenny. You head towards the lovely oak woodland of St Mary's Vale where you will pass pretty streams and a variety of woodland wildlife. You continue on to the summit where there are fabulous views of the Severn Estuary, the Cotswoldsto the east, as far as theBrecon Beacons includingPen y FanandCorn Duto the west and theBristol Channelto the south. There are also great views over the nearby Usk River Valley and Abergavenny. On a clear day you could also see the Shropshire Hills and Somerset.
You descend towards Mynydd Llanwenarth, passing ancient medieval ditches before returning to the finish point, back at the car park.
If you'd like to continue your climbing in the area then the Skirrid Fawr walk also starts in Abergavenny. You could also pick up the splendid Brecon Beacons Way which runs through the area. View Full Details>>
Sutton Bank and the Kilburn White Horse6 miles (9 km)This challenging circular walk in the North York Moors visits the Kilburn White Horse, the lovely Gormire Lake and the scar at Sutton Bank.
You start at the car park which sits just under the white horse and pick up the Cleveland Way to take you to the 978ft (298m) summit of Sutton Bank. The hill is a high point in the Hambleton Hills and commands splendid views over the North York Moors, theVale of Yorkand theVale of Mowbray. At the summit you will find the fascinating Sutton Bank National Park Centre where you can find out how the dramatic landscape was formed in the ice age. From the viewing platform there are views of Roulston Scar, Hood Hill and Lake Gormire. Also look for gliders setting off from the top of the hill.
From the summit you descend through woodland to Gormire Lake, passing the striking Whitestone Cliff as you go. You continue through the countryside before a final woodland section through the Hoodhill Field Plantation returns you to the car park.
The area is also great for mountain biking. TheNorth York MoorsNational Park Authority has created a green, blue and red trail. These are all waymarked and start from the Sutton Bank National Park Centre where you can hire bikes. View Full Details>>
Swanage to Corfe Castle via Ballard Down and Nine Barrow Down8 miles (13 km)Walk from the coastal seaside resort of Swanage to the village of Corfe Castle on this splendid hill top route in Dorset. This is a popular walk of about 8.5 miles which can be done in a day. It crosses the two well known local hills of Ballard Down and Nine Barrow Down with fabulous panoramic views to enjoy. Busses run regularly between Swanage and Corfe Castle so you can do the walk and then get the bus back. You could also return via the Swanage steam railway.
The walk starts on the front in Swanage close to the town centre. You then follow a section of the South West Coast Path up to Ballard Point. You then follow the Purbeck Way west to Studland Hill and Ballard Down. From the elevated position on the down there are splendid views of Old Harry Rocks, Studland, Poole Harbour, the Isle of Wight and Swanage. In the summer there are lots of wildflowers with the Adonis Blue butterfly to look out for. The area is also popular with mountain bikers as the grassy hills are great to ride down.
After climbing across the down you descend towards Ulwell before climbing towards Godslington Hill and Nine Barrow Down. The down reaches a height of 199m (653ft) with fabulous views towards Corfe Castle.
The final section is a lovely descent into Corfe Castle, passing Brenscombe Hill, Rollington Hill and Challow Hill. Here you can enjoy refreshments and explore the fascinating ruins of the 11th century castle. View Full Details>>
Swyre Head2 miles (2.5 km)Visit the highest point of the Purbeck Hills on this coastal walk in Dorset. On a clear day the views are simply breathtaking in all directions.
There is a car park at the end of West Street about a mile south west of the village of Kingston. This short route to the summit starts from here but you could also start from the village if you prefer. If you're coming by public transport then starting from Corfe Castle is a good option. All these start points make use of a section of the The Hardy Way to take you to the hill summit. It's a great spot standing at an elevation of 208m (682ft) and commanding views as far as Dartmoor and the Isle of Portland near Weymouth. The Isle of Wight, Lulworth Cove, Poole Harbour and much of the Purbeck Hills are also visible on a clear day. If you feel like extending your walk you can continue along the Hardy Way to Kimmeridge Bay where there are rock pools with a variety of marine wildlife. Here there is also a nice circular walk to Chapmans Pool to try.
The little village of Kingston is also worth visiting with its Victorian Grade I listed church and 18th century village pub. Beyond that the trail heads to Corfe Common and Corfe Castle. View Full Details>>
Table Mountain4 miles (6 km)Enjoy wonderful views over the Brecon Beacons on this moderate climb to the 451m peakof Table Mountain (Crug Hywel). The walk starts from the pretty town of Crickhowell with its ruined Norman castle and 16th century 13-arched bridge across the river Usk. You then follow the Table Mountain footpath which starts at the northern end of the town. It passes through fields and woodland to the unusual flat top of the mountain. At the top you will find an Iron Age Hill Fort and wonderful views in all directions.
If you would like to continue your walking in this area then you could pick up the Usk Valley Walk which runs past Crickhowell. The long distance Brecon Beacons Way also passes Table Mountain so you can easily pick this up too. View Full Details>>
Tavey Cleave and Hare Tor5 miles (7.5 km)This circular walk takes you to this lovely steep-sided valley of the River Tavy in the Dartmoor National Park. It's a delightful area with the rushing water and waterfalls of the river surrounded by interesting vegetation and several large tors.
The walk starts from the Laneheadcar park at Higher Willsworthy. You then follow footpaths past Nat Tor before picking up a riverside path along the Tavy to Tavy Cleave. You then climb to the 1742 ft (531m) summit of Hare Tor. From here there are splendid, wide ranging views over Dartmoor. The walk then descends to Ger Tor and Nattor Down before returning to the car park.
This walk is located just a couple of miles east of Lydford so if you would like to continue your walking you could visit the beautiful Lydford Gorge. Here you will find the 100-foot-high (30-metre) 'White LadyWaterfall' in a lovely wooded glade. View Full Details>>
The Cheviot9 miles (14 km)Climb to the 815m (2,674ft) summit of the highest hill in the Cheviot hills. The walk begins at the parking area at Langleeford by the Harthope Burn. The route then ascends along public footpaths and with the burn on your left. You continue to Cairn Hill passing the pretty Harthope Linn waterfall on the way. At Cairn Hill you pick up the Pennine Way to take you to the summit. This section takes place on stone slabs through an area of peat bog. At the summit you can enjoy excellent views of the North Sea, the Lake District Fells, Cross Fell and the Lammermuir Hills. You then descend back to Langleeford via Scald Hill.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the Cheviots you could climb Windy Gyle or pick up the Pennine Way. View Full Details>>
The Cobbler Mountain6 miles (9 km)The Cobbler or Ben Arthur is one of the most popular climbs in the highlands. At 884m (2,900ft) it is not the highest of the Arrochar Alps but is considered the most spectacular. It gets its name from the distinctive, large rocky summit which look like acobblerbending over hislast.
The walk begins at the car park at the eastern end of Loch Long near Arrochar. It then follows a well defined and partially waymarked path to the summit. The first section ascends through the woodland around Loch Long and climbs quite gently to the Narnain boulderswhich make a good resting point. You continue to a small Lochan where you turn left and ascend the stone steps. Shortly after you will come to the high point which requires turning right from the path. From here there are fabulous panoramic views across the Highlands, Loch Long, the Paps of Jura and Cuillins. The walk descends to rejoin the same path used for the ascent which you follow to the finish point. View Full Details>>
The Ercall2 miles (3.5 km)This small hill near the The Wrekin has some nice walking trails to follow through Ercall Woods. The area is geoligcally significant with rocks dating back 500 million years and several disused quarries. There's also lots of interesting flora and fauna to look out for. In the spring you will find carpets of bluebells and the dingy skipperand speckled wood butterflies. From the high points on Ercall Hill there are splendid views across the Shropshire countryside.
You can start your walk from the car park on Wellington Road near Ercall Lane. From here you pick up the Shropshire Way and head in a north easterly direction past Lawrence Hill and through the woods to the Ercall Hill summit. The path then descends towards the Ercall Wood College on the outskirts of Wellington. You can also easily reach the area from the centre of Wellington. Head south from the train station or bus station for about a mile and you will come to the woods.
This route is designed for walkers but the area is also very popular with mountain bikers.
To extend your walk you can try the The Wrekin circular walk which starts from the same car park.
You could also visit the nearby Limekiln woods on the other side of the golf course. View Full Details>>
The Hangman Hills5 miles (7.5 km)A challenging circular walk visiting Little Hangman and Great Hangman Hills near Combe Martin in Devon.
The walk starts in Combe Martin and heads east to Little Hangman Hill via Lester Point. You continue by climbing the 1044 feet (318 metres) high Great Hangman Hill. It is England's highest sea cliff and the highest point on theSouth West Coast Path. At the summit you wil find a cairn and can enjoy fabulous views over the surrounding coast and countryside. The route then descends through the countryside to Knap Down, before returning to Combe Martin. Here you can wander through the pretty village, admire the beautiful Combe Martin Bay and reward yourself with refreshments at one of the excellent pubs.
In the summer months look out for pretty flowers such as primroses and violets and wildlife including warblers and various coastal birds.
If you would like to extend your walking in the area then you could head east along the coast to the lovely Heddon Valley. Here you will find riverside walking trails and the imposing cliffs of Heddon's Mouth. View Full Details>>
The Roaches3 miles (5.5 km)This walk is one of the most popular in the Peak District and a favourite for many. It runs along an elevated rocky ridge, with fascinating rock formations and wonderful views of the surrounding countrsyide and the nearby Tittesworth Reservoir. Ridge walking is always a joy but this one is something special. Highlights include a series of weathered gritstone boulders and the mystical Doxy Pool. The pool is said to be inhabited by a malicious water spirit which drags victims into the depths.
If you'd like to continue you walking in the area then there is a super circular route around Tittesworth Reservoir just over a mile from the start of the Roaches walk.
Just off the northern top of this route you will find the fascinating deep rocky chasm of Lud's Church. The geologically fascinating area is well worth a short detour if you have time.
Also nearby is the wonderful Three Shires Head where the counties of Cheshire,Derbyshire andStaffordshiremeet. The area includes a series of pretty waterfalls on the River Dane. View Full Details>>
The Trundle1 miles (2 km)Climb to Trundle Hill and enjoy wonderful views over the South Downs on this walk in the Chichester area. The Iron Age Hillfort sits in an elevated position on St Roche's Hill above Goodwood Racecourse, just to the south of the village of Singleton. You can park at the Seven Points car park, just to the west of the hill, at the end of Town Lane. From here you can pick up a section of the Monarch's Way long distance trail to take you up to the hill. From the 675 feet (206m) summit there are great views of Sussex, Hampshire and the English Channel.You can turn it into a circular walk by continuing along the path towards Goodwood racecourse and then following another bridleway back to the car park.
The hill is part of the larger Goodwood Country Park where you can enjoy miles of walking trails through woodland and countryside. View Full Details>>
The Wrekin5 miles (8 km)This popular walk takes you to the summit of this iconic Shropshire Hill.
You start at the car park at Lawrence Hill and follow good footpaths along the Shropshire Way to the 407m (1,335ft) summit. Here you will find a large Iron Agehill fort and the Wrekin transmitting station beacon. There are also magnificent views over the beautiful Shropshire Hills AONB and no less than 17 counties of England. Other sights to take in from the summit include the Malvern Hills to the south, the neighbouring Shropshire summits of the Clee Hills, the wooded Wenlock Edge, the Long Mynd and the Berwyn hills of Wales. The are also fine views of the River Severn and the Severn Gorge, Coalbrookdale and Iron Bridge, birthplaces of the Industrial Revolution, are just downstream. From the summit you descend to the south and then return to the Lawrence Hill car park via the forest paths in Wenlock Woods.
If you would like to continue your walk you could pick up the Shropshire Way and head towards the nearby River Severn where you can enjoy waterside walking along the Severn Way.
Just to the north east you will find The Ercall. This small hill is surrounded by lovely ancient woodland and 500 million year old rocks. The walk to the hill starts from the same car park.
The Wrekin Hill is close to both Wellington and Telford. View Full Details>>
Thorpe Cloud1 miles (2 km)This short walk climbs to the top of Thorpe Cloud in the Peak District. This small hill can be climbed from the Dove Dale car park. It's a short climb on good footpaths with the reward of wonderful views over the beautiful Dovedale.
Thorpe Cloud reaches a height of 287m (942ft). It was used in the 2010 film ofRobin Hood, starring Russell Crowe.
To continue your walking in the area you could visit Ilam Park and Dovedale. View Full Details>>
Toys Hill4 miles (6 km)Visit the highest point on the Kent Downs on this circular walk in Sevenoaks. There's hundreds of acresof woodland to explore with wonderful views over the Weald of Kent.
This circular walk starts at the National Trust car park and follows footpaths to the Toys Hill viewpoint where you can stop and soak in the views over the Kent countryside. The route then heads along Scords Laneand Scords Wood where you pick up the Greensand Way to take you to the village of Ide Hill. On this section you will pass the memorial bench to Octavia Hill, the founder of the National Trust.
The pretty village of Ide Hill marks the half way point on the walk so it's a nice place to stop for refreshments. Ide hill has a nice village green and the 19th century St Mary's church, the highest church in Kent.
After leaving Ide Hill you head to the beautiful Emmetts Garden. The 19th century garden contains many exotic trees and shrubs from around the world. From here you head back to the car park via Scord Wood.
This route is designed for walking but you can also bring your bike to Toys Hill and pick up one of the bridleways through the woods. If you head along Scords Lane you can pick up a bridleway taking you through Scords Wood to Emmetts Garden.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area then you could head along the Greensand Way to the nearby Chartwell House. View Full Details>>
Troller's Gill7 miles (11.5 km)This walk takes you to the wonderfullimestonegorge of Troller's Gill in Wharfedale in the Yorkshire Dales. The walk starts in Burnsall and heads along the River Wharfe and the Dales Way to Haugh. Here you turn north and head to Skyreholme along the Fir Beck. Soon after you come to the splendid Parceval Hall Gardens. This Grade II listed manor house has 24 acres of formal and woodland gardens to explore and is an added bonus on the walk.
From Parceval Hall you follow the Skyreholme Beck to Troller's Gill. It's a magnificent sight and well worth the climb!
The route then descends through Appletreewick Pasture and Hartlington, returning to Burnsall.
To continue your walking in the area you could visit the nearby Linton Falls or Grimwith Reservoir.
The gorge is located near to the popular town of Grassington. You could reach it from the town by following the Dales Way along the River Wharfe to Burnsall and then continuing along the rest of this route. View Full Details>>
Truleigh Hill3 miles (5 km)This hill in West Sussex has a set of distinctive radio masts on the summit. You can park at a small parking area to the west of the hill and follow the South Downs Way past Beeding Hill to the top of Truleigh Hill. There's great views of the surrounding hills and countryside from the high points. You can turn it into a circular walk by following tracks across Bushy Bottom and then the Monarch's Way back to the car park.
You could also start the walk from nearby Upper Beeding or Bramley Castle if you prefer.
To extend your walk you can continue east along the South Downs Way to Edbarton Hill and then on to Devils Dyke. The beautiful V-Shaped Valley is a great place for walking and mountain biking.
You can use the google street view link below to follow this part of the trail. View Full Details>>
Tryfan2 miles (3.6 km)This is a very popular and very challenging climb to the top of Tryfan in Snowdonia. Tryfan has a distinctive pointed shape with ruggedcrags making it stand it out amongst the other peaks in the area. This route takes you to the 917.5m (3,010ft) summit via the north ridge. The path is difficult in many places so scrambling with both hands is required.
The walk starts from the parking area next to Lllyn Ogwen and ascends to Milestone Buttress and then onto the eye catching Canon Stone. This splinter of rock protrudes from the mountain at a 45 degree angle. The route continues to the north ridge where you will scramble over several boulders before reaching the summit. At the summit you will see the striking boulders of Adam and Eve. It is said that if you jump between the rocks on the 'Leap of Faith' you will be rewarded the Freedom of Tryfan.
The descent takes you to Bwlch Tryfan and then onto the pretty Llyn Bochlwyd. You continue with lovely views of the lake to Bochlwyd Buttress and then back to the shores of Lyn Ogwen.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area then you could head to the nearby Cwm Idwal for more stunning mountainous scenery. The route starts from the eastern end of Llyn Ogwen.
You could also tackle the nearby Glyder Fawr and Glyder Fach or the slightly quieter Carneddau Range.
The climb to Elidir Fawr can be tackled from the nearby Nant Peris at the bottom of the Llanberis Pass. View Full Details>>
Twistleton Scar5 miles (8 km)Enjoy wonderful views towards Ingleborough and Whernside on this circular walk in the Yorkshire Dales. It's a moderate walk with great limestone scenery and views of the surrounding hills. You can start and finish the walk from the pretty village of Chapel-le-Dale.
To extend your walk, head north east and visit the splendid Ribblehead Viaduct. View Full Details>>
Tyndale Monument2 miles (3.5 km)This is a climb to the Tyndale Monument from the popular Cotswolds town of Wotton-under-Edge. It uses a section of the Cotswold Way National Trail to take you from the town to Westridge Woods and then on to the tower. The 19th century monument is an impressive landmark standing at a height of 111 ft (34 m). It was built in honour ofWilliam Tyndale, atranslatorof theNew Testament who was born in the area. From the tower viewpoint there are wonderful views across the Cotswold Hills AONB and into south Wales. You can actually climb the spiral staircaseof 121 steps for even better views! A topographdisplays all the places you can see from the summit.
The site is next to the geologically significant Nibley Knoll which shows a thick section of Lower and MiddleJurassicrocks. After your climb you can descend into the village of North Nibley and enjoy refreshments there.
To extend your walking in the area you could try the Wotton-under-Edge circular walk which takes you through the farmland and woodland surrounding the town. It also passes the Newark Park estate with 700 acres of parkland, gardens and lakes to explore.
If you follow the Cotswold Way north then you can visit Stinchcombe Hill where there is another great viewpoint. From here you can see back to the Tynedale Monument and across the Vale of the River Severn. View Full Details>>
Uffington White Horse2 miles (2.5 km)This circular walk visits White Horse Hill and the Iron Age hillfort of Uffington Castle near Swindon. The area is historically significant with the3000 year old prehistorichill figure and the hillfort located close together. The castle sits at a height of 860 feet (262m) above sea level making it the highest point in Oxfordshire. Also of interest is Dragon Hill, said to be the site where St. George slew the dragon. It's a very attractive area with chalk downland and lovely views over the Berkshire Downs. There is a White Horse Hill car park which gives direct access to the trail to the White Horse.
If you would like to extend your walk you can continue west along the Ridgeway to Wayland's Smithy. This fascinating Neolithiclong barrow is only about a mile from the hill. You could also head south and visit Ashdown House Estate. The National Trust owned estate has nice woodland walks and attractive grounds.
If you are on a bike you can visit White Horse Hill from the Ridgeway which runs past the site. View Full Details>>
Urra Moor6 miles (9 km)Urra Moor is the highest moor in the North York Moors and an atmospheric and beautiful place for a walk. This route takes you to the high point at Round Hill which reaches a height of 454 metres (1,454 ft) above sea level. There's some wonderful moorland scenery with the lovely purple heather in the late summer months. There's also far reaching views across the national park from the elevated position of the moor.
You can start the walk from the Clay Bankcar park just to the north of the moor. The route then follows a section of the Lyke Wake Walk across Carr Ridge to Round Hill. The route then turns west to Medd Crag before returning north to Cowkill Well. From here it is a short distance back to the car park.
On your walk look out for some interesting carved rocks including the Face Stone, a carved stone about 1 metre (3ft 3in) in height into which has been carved the shape of aface.
To extend your walking in the area you could try the Wainstones walk which also starts at the Clay Bank car park. The stones are a series of fascinating sandstone rocky outcrops with a number of interesting Bronze Age carvings. They are located just a mile west of the start/finish point for this walk so are easy to visit.
Two long distance paths also pass Urra Moor. You can pick up the Cleveland Way and the Lyke Wake Walk to further explore this lovely area on the moors. View Full Details>>
Wainstones2 miles (4 km)Climb Hasty Bank Hill and visit the fascinating Wainstones on this circular walk in the North York Moors. The Wainstones are a series of sandstone rocky outcrops with a number of interesting Bronze Age carvings. They are located near the village of Great Broughton and make for a splendid walking destination.
This walk begins at the car park on Clay Bank Road and climbs Hasty Bank using the Cleveland Way National Trail. From the summit there are wonderful views of the Tees Valley and the nearby Roseberry Topping and Urra Moor. The route then descends on an adjacent footpath, passing Hasty Bank Farm before arriving back at the car park. This is a challenging walk but the footpaths are generally good and you are rewarded with truly wonderful views of the North York Moors for most of the way.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area you could head to the nearby Roseberry Topping and Captain Cook's Monument for more great climbing and fabulous views. You could also continue along the waymarked Cleveland Way in either direction.
The Lyke Wake Walk also passes the stones. The challenging walk crosses is a complete crossing of the North Yorkshire Moors from west to east.
The Urra Moor walk also starts from the Clay Bank car park so you could pick this up and head to Round Hill, the highest point on the North York Moors. View Full Details>>
Walbury Hill1 miles (1.5 km)This walk takes you to the highest point in Berkshire at Walbury Hill near Hungerford. The hill summit stands at 297m (974ft) and proffers wonderful views over the surrounding Berkshire countryside. At the summit you will also find the Iron Age Hill fort of Walbury Camp. The hill is also a popular climb for cyclists with a number of bridleways to follow across Inkpen and Walbury Hill.
The walk starts from the Inkpen Beacon car park and follows the Wayfarer's Walk to the hill. The car park is located about half a mile from the hill so it is a short climb.
The Test Way long distance footpath also passes the hill so it's easy to extend this walk and climb to Combe Gibbet, Inkpen Beacon and Combe Wood. You could then return through Combe and turn it into a longer circular walk.
You could also pick up the Wayfarer's Walk and head south east along a wonderful ridge top path to the nearby Pilot Hill, the highest hill in Hampshire. View Full Details>>
Walla Crag2 miles (4 km)This circular walk on Derwentwater climbs to Walla Crag and explores Great Wood in the Lake District. It's a short but rewarding climb with wonderful views over the lake below.
The walk can be started from nearby Keswick but this route starts and finishes from the Great Wood car park off Borrowdale Road, near Calfclose Bay. From here you can directly pick up the Walla Crag Trail to take you up to the crag. The trail heads south from the car park to Cat Gill before turning north east passing Lady's Rake and then on to the Walla Crag summit. The high point stands at 379m (1,243ft) with wonderful views over Derwentwater and towards Skiddaw. You can just descend the same way but this route continues on to Castlerigg where you cross the pretty Brockle Beck. Here you have the option of visiting the fascinating Castlerigg Stone Circle which is just off the route at Castlerigg. However, this route descends on woodland trails through Great Wood, passing Watson's Park on the way.
There's lots to enjoy on the walk with heather in the summer months, the rushing waters of Cat Gill and some spectacular Lakeland views.
The walk can be extended by heading along the lake towards Ashness Bridge and Surprise View. Bleaberry fell is also nearby.
Just to the north is the wonderful Friar's Crag viewpoint and the Castlehead viewpoint. These both proffer wonderful views of the lake and surrounding fells.
The walk can also be started from Keswick as shown in the video below. View Full Details>>
Wallace Monument1 miles (2 km)This walk visits Abbey Craig hill in Stirling, home to the National Wallace Monument which commemorates Sir William Wallace, the 13th-century Scottish Knight. The tower stands on the volcanic crag of Abbey Craig where Wallace is said to have watched the army of King Edward I of England, prior to the Battle of Stirling Bridge.
The walk starts at the visitor centre car park and follows good woodland footpaths to the monument where there are wonderful views over Stirling and the River Forth to the Highland Mountains. For a fee you can climb to the top of the monument itself and enjoy even better views. After visiting the monument it's easy to extend your walk into the surrounding woodland on one of the colour coded trails. View Full Details>>
Wansfell Pike6 miles (10 km)This circular walk in the Lake District takes you up Wansfell Pike fell to Troutbeck, and then back through Skelghyll woods. It's popular with walkers as it begins and ends in the accessible town of Ambleside.
The first section of the walk takes you from the centre of Ambleside to Stock Ghyll Force, a spectacular 70 foot waterfall which can be viewed safely from a railed viewpoint. You continue the ascent to the peak of Wansfell Pike where there are stunning views of the Coniston Fells, Fairfield, Lake Windermere andRed Screes. You descend along Nanny Lane to the village of Troutbeck before country lanes take you on to Townend. This 17th century stone and slate farmhouse is run by the National Trust and open to the public. Inside you will find intricately carved furniture, a traditional farmhouse kitchen with a real fire and afine collection of books which are of international importance.
From Townend you follow Robin Lane to Skelghyll woods before returing to Ambleside.
The route is also often started from Troutbeck - see the lovely video on the right for details. View Full Details>>
Warton Crag3 miles (5 km)This limestone hill near Carnforth stands at 163 metres (535ft) making it the highest point in theArnside and SilverdaleArea of Outstanding Natural Beauty. It is also a nature reserve with grassland, ancient semi-natural woodland and limestone pavement, supporting some of Britain's rarest butterflies. From the high point there are fabulous views of the River Keer estuary, Morecambe Bay, the Forest of Bowland, the Lake District Fells and the Yorkshire Dales.
The area supports rare plants such as Rigid Buckler Fern and Juniper, Pale St. John's Wort and Angular Solomon's-seal. In the woodland area you can find Wood Anemone, Bluebell and Primrose as well as Early Purple Orchid, Violets and Pignut. It is also home to many rare butterflies including Pearl Bordered Fritillary, Small Pearl Bordered Fritillary and High Brown Fritillary.
If you would like to continue your walk you could head to the nearby Leighton Moss Nature Reserve where you will find the largest reedbed in the north west and an abundance of wildlife. The Lancashire Coastal Way also runs past Warton Crag so you could pick this up and head towards Arnside Knott where you can find more interesting wildlife and plantlife. View Full Details>>
Watership Down2 miles (2.5 km)Climb this hill made famous by Richard Adams' 1972 novel 'Watership Down'. The hill is located about 2 miles south west of the village of Kingsclere. The downs are popular with walkers and cyclists with good footpaths and bridleways crossing the area.
This walk starts at the White Hill car park off the B3051 just south of Kingsclere. You then pick up the Wayfarer's Walk long distance footpath to take you to the 237m hill summit. The path passes White Hill and The Warren on the way to Watership Down. It's a beautiful area with wonderful views over the surrounding countryside and the Sydmonton Court estate. The estate consists of a 16th century Tudor manor house and is home to thesummer arts Sydmonton Festival. This walk finishes at the Watership Down Hill summit but you could extend the route by heading north along public footpaths to Sydmonton. If you continue west along the Wayfarer's Walk then you will pass the wonderful Highclere Castle. The house is famous as the location of period drama 'Downton Abbey'. It is surrounded by a 5000 acre estate with nice walking trails to try.
Less than a mile away to the west is Ladle Hill where you will find a well preserved hill fort. View Full Details>>
Waun Fach7 miles (12 km)Climb to the highest mountain in the Black Mountains on this challenging walk in the Brecon Beacons. The walk starts from Castell Dinas just of the A479. This Iron Age hillfort has the highest castle in England and Wales. There is also a car park which makes a good start point for the climb to Waun Fach. From here you follow bridleways past Rhyd-y-car farm before turning south past a series of cairns. The final section turns east to take you to the 811 m (2,661 ft) summit.
You could also start the walk from the nearby village of Talgarth. The village is located just a few miles north of Castell Dinas.
To extend your walking in the area you could head to the nearby Grwyne Fawr Reservoir and Mynydd Du Forest where there are miles of walking trails and mountain bike trails to try. View Full Details>>
Wenlock Edge19 miles (31 km)Wenlock Edge runs from Craven Armsto Much Wenlock, in the Shropshire Hills AONB. This walk follows the 19mi (31km) limestone escarpment using the footpaths of the Shropshire Way and the Jack Mytton Way long distance routes.
The walk begins in the town of Craven Arms, near to the train station. You then head to the 400-million-year-old limestone escarpment following the pretty Quinny Brook out of the town. The walk passes ancient woodland, the 19th century Flounders' Folly and the Elizabethan Wilderhope Manor. There are some challenging climbs on the walk but you are rewarded with splendid views over the Shropshire Hills and beyond. The walk finishes in the interesting town of Much Wenlock where you will find Wenlock Priory - a ruined 12th centurymonastery with a lovely topiary garden.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then the Long Mynd, Caer Caradoc Hill and the beautiful Carding Mill Valley are all nearby. View Full Details>>
Westbury White Horse3 miles (5 km)Climb to Westbury Hill and visit the Westbury White Horse on this circular walk near Bratton in Wiltshire. The striking hill figure is 180 feet (55m) tall and 170 feet (52m) wide and has been adopted as a symbol for the town of Westbury, appearing on welcome signs and the logo of its tourist information centre. It is also considered a symbol for Wiltshire as a whole. From the viewpoint on Westbury Hill there are wonderful views over the SalisburyPlain and the surrounding Wiltshire countryside.
You can start the walk from the car park just to the south of the site near Bratton. Then follow the footpaths north to the lovely viewpoint. You can then pick up other paths along the ridge to the Iron Age hillfort of Bratton Camp.Habitats include extensive chalk grassland where you can look out for the Adonis Blue Butterfly.
The White Horse Trail,Wessex Ridgeway Trail and the Imber Range Perimeter Path all pass the hill so you could easily pick up these long distance footpaths to extend your walk. The White Horse Trail is of particular interest. The waymarked circular trail starts at the Westbury White Horse and runs through Pewsey, Marlborough, Broad Town, Cherhill, Devizes, Steeple Ashton and Bratton. It also visits the Cherhill White Horse.
Heading south along the Imber Range Perimeter Path will take you over Upton Cow Down to Warminster. You could start the walk from Warminster and follow the trail to the White Horse as an alternative route.
View Full Details>>
Whernside8 miles (13 km)Climb to the highest point in North Yorkshire on this challenging walk in the Yorkshire Dales. Whernside is one of the Yorkshire Three Peaks, with the others being Ingleborough and Pen y ghent.
This circular walk begins at Ribblehead and heads to the Blue Clay Ridge via the magnificent Ribblehead Viaduct. You continue your ascent passing the pretty Little Dale Beck and Force Gill where you can see a series of waterfalls. The route then passes Knoutberry Hull and a small tarn before arriving at the 736m (2,415ft) Whernside summit. From here there are fantastic views over the Yorkshire Dales, theLake DistrictandMorecambe Bay.
From the summit you descend to Broadrake before crossing the lovely Winterscales Beck. You then follow the beck to Gunnerfleet Farm, and on to the finish point at Ribblehead.
To extend your walking in the area you could try our easy circular walk around the magnificent Ribblehead Viaduct. The Grade II* listedstructure is one of the England's greatest monuments to Victorian engineering.
The long distance Dales Way and Ribble Way both pass near to the mountain so you could pick up these splendid trails to further explore the area. View Full Details>>
White Nancy2 miles (3.5 km)This walk climbs to unusual structure of White Nancy overlooking the town of Bollington in Cheshire. The folly is in the shape of a small domed sugar loaf and thought to have been built in 1817 by Colonel Gaskell as a monument to the Battle of Waterloo.
This circular walk makes use of the Gritstone Trail to take you from Bollington to the 280.5 metres (920ft) high White Nancy before crossing the Saddle of Kerrridge to Kerridge Hill. From the elevated position above the town you can enjoy splendid views across theCheshire Plain, the mountains ofNorth Walesto the west, the hills ofShropshireto the south and thePenninesto the north and east.
It's easy to extend your walk by continuing along the Gritstone Trail to the nearby Tegg's Nose Country Park. View Full Details>>
White Sheet Hill4 miles (7 km)Climb to the 245m (804ft) summit of this hill in Wiltshire and enjoy wonderful views over the Stourhead Estate and the surrounding countryside. The hill is located about 2 miles to the east of Stourton. You can park at the Stourhead estate National Trust car park and follow footpaths to Drove Lodge before picking up a track to the hill. The area is covered with rare and protected fauna and flora including various wildflowers, several species of orchid, the chalkhill blue butterfly and the golden plover.It is also of archaeological significance with an Iron Age Hill Fort, neolithiccauseway campandbarrows. The views over the Cranborne Chase AONB and the Somerset, Dorset and Wiltshire countrsyside are extensive.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area then you could explore the Stourhead Estate. Here you will find mile of footpaths taking you around an exquisite lake and through woodlands, parkland and gardens. View Full Details>>
Wills Neck2 miles (3.5 km)Climb to the highest point in the Quantock Hillson this circular walk in Somerset. Wills Neck stands at a height of 1,261ft (384m) and commands wonderful views of Dartmoor,Exmoor, theBrecon Beacons, theMendipsandBlackdown Hills.
This walk starts at the Triscombe Stone Car Park and follows the Macmillan Way to the Wills Neck summit. You descend on the Samaritans Way South West. It's a nice walk on decent footpaths with some attractive woodland and great views. The walk can easily be extended by visiting the nearby Bagborough Hill, Lydeard Hill and the interesting Triscombe Quarry. You could also head a couple of miles south and visit the lovely Cothelstone Hill where there are more great views and a herd of Exmoor Ponies. View Full Details>>
Win Green Hill2 miles (2.5 km)Climb to the highest point in the Cranborne Chase AONB and enjoy wonderful views over Shaftesbury, Salisbury Plain, Glastonbury Tor, the Mendips, the Quantocks, the Purbecks and the south coast.
There is a National Trust car park near the hill summit. You can park here and follow footpaths up to the 277 metres (909ft) high point and enjoy the panoramic views over the beautiful surrounding coutryside. The summit has a distinctive look with a clump of beech trees growing on a Bronze Age bowl barrow. In the summer months you will find many interesting plants and flowers on the rich downland of the hill.
You could extend your walk by continuing south along the Wessex Ridgeway to Tollard Royal via Ashcombe Bottom. As an alternative you could start the walk from the village of Tollard Royal and visit the hill from there. View Full Details>>
Win Hill7 miles (10.5 km)This is a popular climb to Win Hill in the Derbyshire Peak District. The hill is in a delightful location above Ladybower Reservoir. From the 462m (1,516ft) summit there are excellent views of the reservoirs below, the River Derwent, the Hope Valley and the surrounding hills. This loop climbs to the hill summit before descending to Hope Brink and Aston.
Start your walk from the Heatherdene car park at the southern end of Ladbybower Reservoir, just off the A6013. From here you can pick up a footpath heading south along the reservoir before crossing the dam and beginning the steep ascent to Win Hill. This takes you through woodland and along Park Clough to the summit. From here you can enjoy one of the best views in the Peak District with the Upper Derwent Valley, Stanage Edge, the Great Ridge, Mam Tor and Kinder Scout all visible on a clear day.
After taking in the views the walk descends to Hope Brink. This area has some good bridleways which are popular with mountain bikers. From here you turn south towards the village of Aston where you follow country lanes back to the reservoir. The route finishes with a short section along the Derwent Valley Heritage Way which leads you back to the car park.
The hill is located very close to the villages of Bamford and Thornhill. You could start your walk from either of these places if you prefer.
There's lots of good options for extending your walk in this beautiful area. Just to the east you can climb to Bamford Edge where there are great views and lots of interestinggritstone rock formations to look out for. Also nearby is the wonderful gritstoneescarpment of Stanage Edge. It's another geologically fascinating place with more wonderful views to enjoy.
Part of this walk uses the Derwent Valley Heritage Way long distance trail. You could follow the trail south along the River Derwent to Hathersage.
On the western side of the dam you can pick up the Thornhill Trail. The easy cycling and walking trail runs south along disused railway line from the dam to Bamford station. View Full Details>>
Windgather Rocks6 miles (10 km)This walk visits this interesting gritstonecrag which is popular with rock climbers. There are fascinating geological rock formations and wonderful views over the Peak District to enjoy.
The walk starts from Whaley Bridge, near the train train station in the town. You then follow footpaths around the pretty Toddbrook Reservoir before climbing to Taxal Moor. From here you can enjoy super views back towards Whaley Bridge and the reservoir. The final section takes you along Taxal Edge to the rocks where you can enjoy splendid views over the surrounding countryside.
The walk can be extended by continuing south to Shining Tor and Cats Tor. It's a great ridge walk with more wide ranging views.
Also nearby are Errwood Reservoir and Fernilee Reservoirs where you can enjoy waterside trails. View Full Details>>
Windy Gyle10 miles (16 km)Climb to the summit of this hill in the Cheviots and enjoy fabulous views into Scotland and England as you stand high on the border.
The walk begins from the Wedder Leap car park and heads towards Shorthope hill, crossing the River Coquet and following the Rowhope Burn as you go. You continue the climb to Little Ward Law before coming to Russel's Cairn at the 619m (2,031ft) summit of Windy Gyle. From here there are wonderful views over the Scottish Borders,the Eildon HillsandEdinburgh.
You begin the descent by heading west along the Pennine Way and then south towards Swineside Law and Hindside Knowe. Shortly after you cross the River Coquet and return to the car park. This is a challenging walk but the footpaths are generally good and you're rewarded with some stunning scenery.
To continue your walking in the Cheviots you could climb the highest hill - The Cheviot. View Full Details>>
Winnats Pass5 miles (7.5 km)This challenging circular walk in the Peak District takes you through this spectacular pass. The walk starts at the village of Castleton and climbs through Winnats Pass with its toweringlimestonepinnacles. It's a wonderful geological feature and worth the steep climb. On the way you'll pass Speedwell Cavern where you can take an amazing underground boat trip 450m under the Hills of Castleton.
The walk makes use of the Limestone Way to return to Castleton, passing Cave Dale and the fascinating Mam Tor, Limestone Way. This ruined medieval castle has an amazing history stretching back to the Norman Conquestof 1066.
The walk can be extended to visit the nearby Mam Tor. View Full Details>>
Winter Hill8 miles (13.5 km)Enjoy a walk to Winter Hill on the West Pennine Moors in Lancashire. The walk begins in Rivington Country Park and takes you to the 1,496 feet (456m) high summit on a series of footpaths.
After leaving the country park you ascend crossing Rivington Moor with fine views of Lower Rivington Reservoir and Anglezarke Reservoir. You continue towards the village of Belmont where there is the opportunity for a short detour to the pretty Belmont reservoir. After leaving Belmont you ascend towards the summit of the hill where you will see the Winter Hill TV Mast. From here there are fabulous views towards Greater Manchester, Blackpool Tower,Jodrell Bank Observatory,Snaefell in theIsle of Man and the Lake District mountains.
The descent takes you to Crooked Edge Hill and Horwich before returning to the country park. View Full Details>>
Wintour's Leap2 miles (4 km)Climb to this magnificent limestone viewpoint on this walk in the Wye Valley. You can start the walk from the south western end of the village of Woodcroft. Follow woodland trails to the quarry and up to the viewpoint. It's a lovely spot with the limestone cliffs and splendid views down to the river below. The crag is a very popular spot for rock climbers with hundreds of routes with several overhangs on the impressive cliffs. After passing Wintour's Leap you can follow the footpath round the river to Lancaut and the remains of St James' Church, once the centre of a medieval village. It's a lovely spot with the church ruins overlooking the river and a plaque describing the history of the abandoned village.
Part of this route uses the Offa's Dyke Path so you could continue along the trail to extend your walk. If you head north you can visit the splendid viewpoint at the Devil's Pulpit. View Full Details>>
Wittenham Clumps1 miles (1.5 km)Climb to these two hills near Dorchester for wonderful views over the Oxfordshire and Berkshire countryside. The 'clumps' include Round Hill at 390 feet (120m)and the 350 feet (110m)Castle Hillwhich is about 380 yards (350m) to the south-east. The Clumps are one of the most visited outdoor sites in Oxfordshire, attracting over 200,000 visitors a year.
You can park at the Wittenham Clumps car park right next to the hills to start your walk. Then follow the footpaths up to Round Hill where you can enjoypanoramic views, overlooking some of the villages and towns which mark some of the first settlements of theEnglish. A viewpoint guideat the hilltop displays some of the features of interest you can see from the summit. These include significant locks on the River Thames, Faringdon Folly, Didcot Power Station and Dorchester Abbey. On a clear day there's also great views of the Chiltern Hills and Cotswold Hills.
After taking in the views from Round Hill you can make your way over to Castle Hill which is the site of an Iron Age Hillfort. Excavations of the site suggest it was occupied since the Bronze Age around 1000 BC. Artefacts recovered include an oval bronze shieldand the Wittenham Sword andscabbard, dating from the late Iron Age.
Just to the north of the hill you will find Little Wittenham Woods where you can extend your walk on the woodland trails next to the river.
You can also continue your walk along the Thames Path which runs near to the hills. Heading south will take you to Wallingford where you can visit the ruins of the 11th century Wallingford Castle and enjoy more riverside paths.
You can also try our longer Dorchester Circular Walk which visits the clumps, Shillingford and Dorchester Abbey. View Full Details>>
Worcestershire Beacon4 miles (6.5 km)This walk takes you to the high point of the Malvern Hills at Worcestershire Beacon. View Full Details>>
Y Garn4 miles (7 km)Enjoy breathtaking views over the Snowdonia National Park on this challenging climb to the 947m (3,107ft) summit of Y Garn.
The walk starts at the car park at the western end of Llyn Ogwen and climbs to the wonderful natural amphitheatre of Cwm Idwal. In aRadio Times poll in 2005, Cwm Idwal was ranked the 7th greatest natural wonder in Britain. You pass along the beautiful clear waters of Llyn Idwal before climbing towards Pinnacle Crag. You continue to the summit with views Llyn Clyd and the Ogwen Valley. The route then descends towards the Devil's Kitchen and Cwm Idwal before returning to the car park.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could try the challenging Tryfan mountain.
If you continue north from the peak you can visit Foel-Goch, the Marchlyn Mawr reservoir and the summit of Elidir Fawr. View Full Details>>
Yeavering Bell3 miles (5 km)Climb to the summit of this hilll in the Cheviots and visit the largest Iron Age hillfort in the region. The walk starts near Kirknewton and climbs to the fort on public footpaths and the St Cuthbert's Way long distance path. At the fort you can see the platforms of more than one hundred timber-built roundhouses and an inner fort on a 12 acre site. If you're staying in nearby Wooler you could follow the St Cuthbert's Way west to the site as an alternative route. View Full Details>>
Yorkshire Three Peaks25 miles (40 km)Visit the famous Yorkshire Dales three peaks of Pen y ghent, Whernside and Ingleborough on this challenging circular walk. The three peaks challenge is a popular walk with those raising money for charities. You can also join an organised group walk, see the link below for more details.
The route begins in Horton in Ribblesdale and heads first to Pen y ghent. The footpath climbs to the 694m (2,277ft) summit via Brackenbottom Scar, before descending on the Pennine Way via Tarn Barn, Horton Scar, Jackdaw Hill and Hull Point - the largest natural hole in England.
The walk then continues to Whernside, passing caves, becks and waterfalls on your way to Ribblehead. You then ascend to the 736m (2,415ft) Whernside summit via Ribblehead Viaduct, the Blue Clay Ridge, Little Dale Beck and Force Gill where you can see a series of waterfalls. You descend via Broadrake, Philpin Lane and Low Hill.
You then begin the ascent of Ingleborough, passing through the lovely Ingleborough Nature Reserve on your way to the 723 metres (2,372ft) summit. The route descends back to the finish point at Horton in Ribblesdale via Simon Fell, Grouse Butts and Sulber.
Many people aim to complete the challenge in under 12 hours. Those that do are invited to pay to join the Pen-y-ghent Cafe's privately owned 'Three Peaks of Yorkshire Club'. View Full Details>>
Yr Eifl4 miles (6 km)Climb the Yr Eifl mountain group on this challenging circular walk on the Llyn Peninsula. The three summits are collectivley known as 'The Rivals' offering wonderful views over the Llyn Peninsula coastline, the Isle of Man, the mountains of Ireland and the Lake District, as well as the entire sweep ofCardigan Bay. The route visits the peak of Tre'r Ceiri where you will find Britain's best preserved Iron Age hill fort.
The walk starts from the Porth-y-Nant upper car park just off the B4417 north of Llithfaen. You then ascend past the Graig Ddu cliffswhere you can look down and see the abandoned village of Borth y Nant. You continue to Bwlch yr Eifl where you turn east towards the 561m (1,841ft) summit of Yr Eifl. It's a stunning spot. Take a while to soak in the magnificent views of the coast and mountains of Snowdonia.
The footpath then descends to Tre'r Ceiri where you can explore the interesting Iron Age stone hut circles before descending the mountain.
If you would like to continue your walking in the area then you could pick up the Llyn Peninsula Coastal Path which runs past the mountain. View Full Details>>

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