GPS Cycle and Walking Routes


Yorkshire Dales Walks

Please use the links below to view full route information including descriptions, elevation profiles, interactive maps and GPS downloads.

You can also view an overview map of all the routes in the using the Yorkshire Dales Walk Map


Route NamePhotoDistanceDescription
Aysgarth Falls2 miles (4 km)Enjoy a woodland walk to the spectacular Aysgarth Falls in the Yorkshire Dales National Park. There are three tiers to the falls which make for a wonderful spectacle, particularly in wet weather. The upper and middle falls were featured in the film'Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves'.
This circular walk starts on the northern side of the River Ure by the Aysgarth Falls National Park Centre where there is a good sized car park. The centre is a great place to find information about the walks in Aysgarth and Carperby. There is also a cafe for refreshments. You can see it by clicking on the street view link below.
After leaving the car park you can pick up a woodland trail through St Joseph's Wood and out into the countryside, where there are great views of the surrounding area. The walk then descends to the river where there are nice viewpoints near the falls.
The area is a nature reserve so look out for some lovely flora and fauna on your walk. In the spring and summer you can see wildlflowers and bluebells in the woods. Also look out for wild birds,squirrelsanddeer.
You can return to the car park or extend your walk by crossing the Yore Bridge and following another footpath on the southern side of the river. You'll pass the old Yore Mill and Craft Shop which has some nice gifts.
Bolton Abbey7 miles (11.5 km)Explore the huge estate surrounding the ruins of this 12th-century Augustinianmonastery. There are miles of riverside walking trails to follow with the River Wharfe running through the estate. The paths take you to the Strid - here theRiver Wharfe becomes very narrow causing the water to rush with great force at this point. There are also colour coded nature trails taking you through ancient woodland and bluebells in spring.
The fascinating ruins of the 12th century priory are also worth exploring. Nearby are stepping stones across the river which are always popular. You can extend your walk by heading across Barden Moor or climbing Simon's seat through the Valley of Desolation.
The Dales Way also runs through Bolton Abbey so you could continue along this path.
Buckden Pike7 miles (12 km)This circular walk climbs to the 702 metres (2,303ft) summit of Buckden Pike in the Yorkshire Dales National Park.
The walk starts in the parking area in the village of Buckden and follows a bridleway to the summit. From here there are wonderful views of Great Whernside, Yockenthwaite Moor and across the Yorkshire Dales. You then descend to Starbotton passing the war memorial to the Polish airmen who died when their Wellington Bomber crashed on Buckden Pike during a snowstorm in 1942. The descent follows the Walden Road with views of pretty becks and waterfalls on the way. At Starbotton you cross the River Wharfe and pick up the Dales Way for a lovely riverside section taking you back to Buckden. Look out for Kingfisher, Heron, and Dipper on this section of the walk.
Catrigg Force7 miles (12 km)This circular walk visits the beautiful Catrigg Force waterfall in the Yorkshire Dales. It's a wonderful spot and can be easily reached from Stainforth. This longer walk starts at Settle and involves some more challenging hill climbing.
After leaving Settle you climb towards Attimire Scar where you can see a series of caves and interestinglimestone formations. You then descend to the waterfall, passing Jubilee Cave, Victoria Cave and Winskill Stones - a 74-acre area of limestone grassland and limestone pavement. The area is also a nature reserve with a wide variety of plants and wildflowers, such as sandwort, horseshoe vetch, meadow saxifrage, mossy saxifrage, mountain everlasting and moonwort.
Shortly after passing through Winskill Stones you come to Catrigg Force. The waterfall has 2 main drops of about 20 feet and a series of smaller waterfalls. It's a delightful area, with peaceful woodland and the Stainforth Beck to enjoy.
The route then continues to Stainforth before picking up the Ribble Way and following the River Ribble back to Settle. This lovely waterside section also passes the Stainforth Force Waterfall.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could head to the nearby Malham Tarn Estate or continue along the Ribble Way.
Cautley Spout2 miles (4 km)Cautley Spout isEngland's highest (cascade)waterfallabove ground. It's located near Sedburgh in the Yorkshire Dales National Park. This walk follows a footpath running alongside the waterfall from Low Haygarth to the top of the spout. It is a steep climb but the footpath is essentially a series of steps so it is quite an easy path to the follow. This is likely to be a very peaceful walk as the area does not attract too many visitors. Ideal if you are looking for some solitudein beautiful surroundings. You could continue your walk by climbing further over the beautiful Howgill Fellswhere there are magnificent views of the Lake District.
Cotter Force1 miles (1 km)This walk visits the lovely Cotter Force waterfall near Appersett in the Yorkshire Dales. The walk starts at the roadside parking area next to Holme Heads Bridge and follows a good footpath along the Cotterdale Beck to the falls. The falls are very pretty, comprising of six steps, each with its own small waterfall. The area is good for birdwatching too. Look out for dippers, grey wagtails, kingfishers and redstarts.
There are plenty of good options for continuing your walking in this lovely area. You could visit the nearby Hardraw Force waterfall or climb Great Shunner Fell.
Digley Reservoir2 miles (2.5 km)Enjoy an easy circular walk around this delightful reservoir near Holmfirth in the Yorkshire Dales. There are lovely views of the surrounding moorland, woodland and countryside to enjoy as you make your way around the water.
The walk starts at the good sized car park at the North Eastern end of the reservoir off Gibriding Lane. You then pick up a good footpath running along the northern end of the reservoir on the Kirklees Way. You pass Bilberry reservoir and head through Digley Wood on the southern side of the water, before returning to the car park using Fieldhead Lane.
The reservoir is located about 2 miles from Holmfirth so you could start the walk from the town and follow the Holme Valley Circular Walk to the reservoir as an alternative to parking at the car park. This takes you through an area associated with the sitcom Last of the Summer Wine which was filmed in Holmfirth and the surrounding area. You could also enjoy a stroll along the Digley Brook and River Holme at the eastern end of the reservoir or follow the Kirklees Way to the nearby Brownhill and Ramsden Reservoirs.
Gordale Scar4 miles (7 km)This walk climbs to the spectacular Gordale Scar in the Yorkshire Dales. You start in the pretty village of Malham and follow Gordale Lane and Gordale Beck to Gordale Scar. Here you will find twowaterfallsand overhanging limestone cliffs over 100 metres high. It's a truly stunning sight and well worth the climb from Malham. From Gordale Scar you continue the climb towards Seaty Hill where there are magnificent views of the Yorkshire Dales. The final section descends along country lanes to Malham Village.
If you'd like to extend your walking in the area then you could visit Malham Cove and the Malham Tarn Estate for more beautiful scenery.
Gouthwaite Reservoir5 miles (8 km)This walk takes you around this delightful reservoir, near Pately Bridge and Ramsgill. The route makes use of the Nidderdale Way footpath which runs around the reservoir. It's a super place for birdwatching with three viewing areas on the edge of the reservoir. Look out forgreat spotted woodpeckerandnuthatch in the trees around the water.On the reservoir you can spot goosanders, goldeney,mallard,tufted duckandpochard. Other visitors include buzzard,red kite,hen harriers,merlinsandkestrels.
This walk starts at the car park on the western end of the reservoir but you could also start at Pately Bridge and follow the River Nidd to the reservoir.
To extend your walk you could follow the Nidderdale Way to the spectacular limestone gorge at How Stean Gorge.
Great Shunner Fell8 miles (13 km)Climb to the highest point in Wensleydale on this popular walking route in the Yorkshire Dales National Park. The route begins at the village of Hardraw near to the lovely Hardraw Force waterfalls. It then follows the Pennine Way National Trail to the village of Thwaite. As such the path is well defined and way-marked.
There are fabulous views from the summit of Wensleydale to the south,Ribblesdaleto the south west andSwaledaleto the north, as well as views intoCumbriaandCounty Durham.
Grimwith Reservoir4 miles (6.5 km)Enjoy a circular walk around this lovely reservoir in the Yorkshire Dales. There is a good footpath running around the reservoir with fabulous views of the surrounding countryside. The reservoir is great for bird watching, look out for wildfowlincluding wigeon,teal,greylag geeseandCanada geese on the water.Other winged visitors to the area include ringed plover,northern lapwing,common redshank, curlew,reed bunting,lesser redpoll,whinchatandsedge warbler.
The walk starts at the car park at the southern end of the reservoir and heads to Grimwith Moor, crossing Grimwith Beck on the way. You continue to Bracken Haw, cross the pretty Blea Gill and then pass Hebden Moor. The final section passes Hartlington pasture before returning to the car park.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could head to the nearby Linton Falls. Just to the south is the wonderful limestone gorge at Troller's Gill.
Gunnerside Gill5 miles (8 km)This circular walk in Swaledale takes you through the lovely Gunnerside Gill. It's a beautiful valley with imposing scars, woodland, waterfalls and the pretty Gunnerside Beck running through the centre. The area has a fascinating industrial history having been a significant area for lead mining in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. You will pass several ruined buildings from this period including the remains of Blakethwaite Smelt Mill and the old mine offices.
This circular walk starts in the pretty village of Gunnerside where you will find a parking area, a pub and tea rooms for refreshments. You then follow footpaths north along Gunnerside Beck to Gunnerside Gill. The walk then crosses the beck and returns through some lovely Yorkshire Dales countryside.
The River Swale runs past Gunnerside so you could extent your walk along the nearby riverside path. Also nearby is the splendid Kisdon Force Waterfall Walk in Keld.
Hardraw Force1 miles (1 km)This walk takes you to the beautiful Hardraw Force waterfall in the Yorkshire Dales. Access to the waterfall is through the 13th century Green Dragon Inn for a small fee. It's worth the fee as the waterfall is England's highest single drop waterfall, falling some 100ft. A footpath takes you through ancient woodland and along the Hardraw Beck to the falls. The falls are in a lovely spot set in the spectacular narrow gorge of Hardraw Scaur.The area includes a new Heritage Centre with information about the falls and facilities such as toilets, showers and a cafe.
There's plenty of good options for continuing your walking in the area. You could head to the nearby Cotter Force waterfall where you'll find another good footpath leading to these pretty falls. The Pennine Way also runs past Hardraw so you could pick this up too.
Herriot Way50 miles (80 km)This long distance circular route takes you through areas of the Yorkshire Dales associated with the vet and author James Herriot.
The walk begins in the pretty village of Aysgarth in Wensleydale. Here you can admire the wonderful Aysgarth Falls before following the River Ure to Askrigg. The village was used as the fictionalDarrowbyin theBBCTV seriesAll Creatures Great and Small, based on the books by James Herriot. Just above Askrigg you can visit the lovely Mill Gill and Whitfield Force Waterfalls.
After leaving Askrigg you continue to the village of Hardraw where you will find the splendid Hardraw Force Waterfall. The waterfall is England's highest single drop waterfall, falling some 100ft.
The route then heads to the market town of Hawes before climbing Great Shunner Fell. It is the highest point in Wensleydale and commands wonderful views over Ribblesdaleto the south west andSwaledaleto the north, as well as views intoCumbriaandCounty Durham.
You descend the mountain to Thwaite and then on to the village of Keld where you will find the beautiful Kisdon Force, East Gill and Catrake Force waterfalls.
From Keld you continue across Gunnerside Moor, passing the beautiful valley of Gunnerside Gill. It's a lovely area with a fascinating lead mining history. You can still see several ruined buildings from the period including the remains of Blakethwaite Smelt Mill and the old mine offices.
The walk continues east to Healaugh, passing along Mill Gill. You then follow the River Swale into Reeth.
You continue to Castle Bolton passing through open moorland with lots of pretty heather. The fascinating 14th-centuryBolton Castle is another route highlight.
The final section takes you back to Aysgarth, passing through more lovely Yorkshire Dales countryside.
How Stean Gorge3 miles (5 km)Visit this spectacular limestone gorge and enjoy a walk through the beautiful Nidderdale countryside. You can park in the village of Middlesmoor and then follow footpaths to the gorge about half a mile south. It's great for walkers with lots of public footpaths along the rushing river and through the surrounding woodland. The area also has an activity centre where you can try caving, rock climbing, abseiling and canoeing.
After exploring the gorge you could extend your walk by picking up the Nidderdale Way and following it to the nearby Gouthwaite Reservoir.
Hutton Roof Crags and Farleton Fell5 miles (8.5 km)Explore some of the finestlimestone pavement in the country on this climb to Hutton Roof Crags and Farleton Fell. The scenery is striking with boulders and unusual rock formations covering the landscape. You'll pass across Hutton Roof Crags and climb over Newbiggin Crags before reaching the high point at Farleton Knot. All the way there are magnificent views over the surrounding fells. The area is also a nature reserve with a wide variety of interesting flora and fauna. Look out for fly orchids, lily of the valley and dark redhelleborine. Wildlife includes small tortoiseshell and brimstone butterflies with birdlife such as woodpecker, long-tailed tits, redwing,fieldfareandmistlethrush. You may also see roe deer.
This circular walk starts in the village of Hutton Roof and follows the Limestone Link - Cumbria over Hutton Roof Crags and Newbiggin Crags before reaching the high point at Farleton Knott. From here there are fabulous views over the Lake District and the Yorkshire Dales. The route then follows country lanes and other footpaths back to Hutton Roof.
Hutton Roof Crags is located a couple of miles west of Kirkby Lonsdale. You could start the walk from here and follow the Limestone Link - Cumbria to the crags.
Ingleborough Mountain8 miles (13 km)One of Yorshire's Three Peaks, Ingleborough stands at a height of 723 metres (2,372ft). This circular walk starts in the village of Clapham and takes you along Clapham lake to Clapdale Woods. You continue along Clapham Beck toward

Ingleborough Cave

. You can take a short detour from the route to visit this show cavewhich has a long fossil gallery and interesting stalagmitic formations. From the cave you continue to Trow Gill where you will pass through a lovely, wooded limestone ravine before reaching Gaping Gill natural cave. You continue north to the summit where there are fantastic views over the Yorkshire Dales.
The descent takes you through Newby Moss to Newby Cote where you pick up a country lane which takes you back to Clapham.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could try climbing the other two of the Yorkshire Dales three peaks:-Pen y ghent and Whernside.
On the southern slopes of Ingleborough you will find the fascinating Norber Erratics. The geologically significant set of glacial boulders were probably deposited by melting ice sheets at the end of thelast ice age, around 12,000 years ago. They can be reached by heading south from Sulber Nick to Moughton Scar and Crummack Dale.
Ingleton Falls4 miles (7 km)One of the loveliest walks in England, this circular trail visits a series of beautiful waterfalls in Ingleton in the Yorkshire Dales.
The walk starts at the car park in Ingleton and follows the River Twiss through the woodland of Swilla Glen. You then cross the river at Manor Bridge and soon come to Pecca Falls. These falls consist of five main waterfalls dropping 30 metres over sandstone and slate into deep plunge pools. You then climb to Hollybush Spout, before coming to the spectacular Thornton Force. Here you will find a viewing area where you can watch the river plunge 14 metres over a cliff of limestone.
From Thornton Force you head to Ravenray Bridge where you cross the river and begin the return leg. This starts by following Twisleton Lane to Twisleton Hall and Beezley Farm. Here you pick up the River Doe to Beezley Falls and Triple Spout – three beautiful waterfalls all side by side. You continue south along the river passing Rival Falls, and Baxengyhll Gorge where there is a viewing platform with fabulous views of the river and Snow Falls. The final section takes you into the pretty village of Ingleton and then on to the finish point at the car park.
The Richmond Way long distance walk passes through Ingleton so you could pick this up to continue your walking in the area.
Kisdon Force5 miles (8 km)This walk visits the stunning Kisdon Force, East Gill and Catrake Force waterfalls in the Yorkshire Dales National Park. The walk begins in Keld and first heads to the nearby Catrake Force. It's a beautiful spot comprising of a series of 4 steps each with its own small waterfall. The largest single drop being about 20 feet (6.1m). You then head to East Gill Force - it has two main torrents: the upper falls have an impressive 4.5 metre drop whilst the lower section is a series of stepped cascades that fall three metres as East Gill enters the River Swale. The walk continues east to Kisdon Force waterfalls. These stunning falls drop 10 metres (33ft)over two cascades and are surrounded by Kisdon Force Woods with mixed broad-leavedwoodlandincluding ash,wych elmandrowantrees.
The walk then continues along the River Swale towards Muker, passing more pretty waterfalls along the way. You return on the eastern side of the river to Keld.
This is a lovely, fairly easy walk with river views, waterfalls, and woodland.
The Pennine Way walking trail runs past the falls so you could pick this up if you wanted to continue your walk. Also nearby is the fascinating Gunnerside Gill.
The video below shows a similar route but this time starting from Muker. The walk below starts from Keld for more direct access to the falls.
Linton Falls3 miles (5 km)This popular walk from Grassington visits the spectacular Linton Falls in the Yorkshire Dales. You start off in the lovely village of Grassington and soon join the River Wharfe for a waterside stroll which takes you past the falls. There is a bridge across the river which affords fabulous views of the falls below. The route returns to Grassington through countryside footpaths.
If you'd like to continue your walking in the area then you could pick up the Dales Way and head along the River Wharfe through the beautiful Wharfedale. Also nearby is the delightful Grimwith Reservoir which has a walking path around its perimeter. Just a few miles to the east is the wonderful limestone gorge at Troller's Gill.
Malham Cove9 miles (14 km)This super walk visits two well known beauty spots in the Yorkshire Dales. It begins at the village of Malham and follows the Pennine Way to the stunning Malham Cove. The cove is a huge curved cliff formation of limestone rock with a vertical cliff face of about 260 feet high.There are fabulous views across the Yorkshire Dales from the high point.
From the cove you continue to climb towards the beautiful Malham Tarn. The tarn is owned by the National Trust and is also a designated nature reserve. The walk takes you around the tarn on footpaths and country lanes before returning to Malham village on the Pennine Way.
An alternative route takes you to the tarn via the spectacular Gordale Scar where you will find twowaterfallsand overhanging limestone cliffs over 100 metres high.
Mill Gill and Whitfield Force Waterfalls2 miles (3.5 km)Just above the little village of Askrigg in Wensleydale there is a lovely walking trail along a river with a series of pretty waterfalls and peaceful woodland. This walk starts in the village and follows the footpath to Mill Gill Force and Whitfield Force falls before returning through some beautiful Yorkshire Dales countryside.
It's a really pleasant area with good signed paths, the sound of the running water and nice shady woodland.
Norber Erratics2 miles (3 km)This walk climbs to this geologically significant set of glacial erraticboulders in the Yorkshire Dales. The Norber erratics can be reached from the nearby village ofAustwick. It's a short but quite challenging climb from the village to the rocks which are situated on the southern slopes of Ingleborough Mountain. The fascinating boulders were probably deposited by melting ice sheets at the end of thelast ice age, around 12,000 years ago. The walk exposes you to some fine limestone scenery with wonderful views to be enjoyed from the high points. The boulders are dramtically placed with the far reaching dales scenery making a striking backdrop for any photographer.
This walk starts in Austwick and takes you north to the boulders on good footpaths. You could also start from the nearby village of Clapham. The walk can be extended by heading north to Thwaite Scars, Crummack Dale and Moughton Scars. Just to the north of Moughton Scars you can pick up the trail to Ingleborough Mountain at Sulber Nick.
After your exercise you can refresh yourself in the local pub in Austwick.
To further extend your walking in the area you can head west to Clapham where you can enjoy a stroll along Clapham Lake and Clapham Beck.
Pen y ghent6 miles (9 km)Climb to the 694m (2,277ft) summit of Pen y ghent on this challenging circular walk in the Yorkshire Dales. Pen y ghent is probably the most famous and popular of Yorkshire's famous three peaks. The others are Ingleborough and Whernside. This route is the classic ascent from Horton in Ribblesdale via Brackenbottom Scar.
You start in the village of Horton in Ribblesdale at the car park and follow country lanes towards Brackenbottom. You continue the ascent, picking up the Pennine Way just before reaching the summit. From here there are fabulous views across the Yorkshire Dales. The descent follows the Pennine Way passing Tarn Barn, Horton Scar and Hull Point - the largest natural hole in England.
River Swale Richmond3 miles (5 km)A short riverside walk from Richmond along the River Swale to the National Trust owned Hudswell Woods. You can start the walk from Richmond Bridge and then pick up the footpaths to Billy Bank Wood, Round Howe and Hudswell Woods. It's a lovely stroll through riverside woodland with bluebells, wild garlic, lesser celandines and wood anemones to look out for. There's lots of wildlife such as chiffchaff, blackcap, garden warblers and a variety of butterflies.
The Richmond Way long distance footpath starts at Richmond so it's easy to extend your walking in the beautiful Swaledale. If you follow the trail west it will take you through Whitecliffe Wood to Applegarth Scar.
Semer Water3 miles (5.5 km)This lovely walk in the Yorkshire Dales takes you around the pretty Semer Water and through the heart of Raydale. You'll pass rivers, becks, a nature reserve and some beautiful countryside. It's a hidden gem so you should enjoy a peaceful and tranquil walk.
The walk starts at the car park near Countersett, on the northern end of the lake. You then follow a good footpath past the lake to Marsett, passing Keld Scar waterfall, Crooks Beck and Marsett Beck on the way. You then follow Marsett Lane back to Countersett.
Skipton Castle2 miles (2.5 km)Explore the grounds and woods surrounding this medieval castle in North Yorkshire. The walk takes you along the river which runs past the castle and then into the nearby Skipton Woods where you'll find pleasant woodland trails. You then head up to Park Hill where there are great views of the town and castle. You can also explore the castle grounds with the Tudor courtyard, 12th-century chapel, Conduit Courtand twin-towered Norman gatehouse.
Smardale Gill Viadiuct3 miles (5 km)This walk takes you through the pretty Smardale Gill along the trackbed of a disused railway line. It leads to magnificent Smardale Viaduct. The viaduct was part of theSouth Durham and Lancashire Union Railway and has 14 arches, is 90ft (27m) high and 550ft (170m) long. It's an impressive sight with the structure surrounded by the lovely countryside of the Cumbrian hills and the pretty Smardale Beck which runs through the gill.
The area is also a managed nature reserve with wildlflowers, woodland and grassland. Look out for flora such as bluebells, primrose and early purple orchid. Wildlife includes goldfinch, field fare and redwing with lots of butterflies around the wildflowers in the summer months. Red squirrels and roe deercan also be seen in the reserve.
To extend your walking in the area you could climb Smardale Fell or Crosby Garrett Fell for wonderful views over the surrounding area.
Twistleton Scar5 miles (8 km)Enjoy wonderful views towards Ingleborough and Whernside on this wonderful circular walk in the Yorkshire Dales.
Whernside8 miles (13 km)Climb to the highest point in North Yorkshire on this challenging walk in the Yorkshire Dales. Whernside is one of the Yorkshire Three Peaks, with the others being Ingleborough and Pen y ghent.
This circular walk begins at Ribblehead and heads to the Blue Clay Ridge via the magnificent Ribblehead Viaduct. You continue your ascent passing the pretty Little Dale Beck and Force Gill where you can see a series of waterfalls. The route then passes Knoutberry Hull and a small tarn before arriving at the 736m (2,415ft) Whernside summit. From here there are fantastic views over the Yorkshire Dales, theLake DistrictandMorecambe Bay.
From the summit you descend to Broadrake before crossing the lovely Winterscales Beck. You then follow the beck to Gunnerfleet Farm, and on to the finish point at Ribblehead.
Yorkshire Three Peaks25 miles (40 km)Visit the famous Yorkshire Dales three peaks of Pen y ghent, Whernside and Ingleborough on this challenging circular walk. The three peaks challenge is a popular walk with those raising money for charities. You can also join an organised group walk, see the link below for more details.
The route begins in Horton in Ribblesdale and heads first to Pen y ghent. The footpath climbs to the 694m (2,277ft) summit via Brackenbottom Scar, before descending on the Pennine Way via Tarn Barn, Horton Scar, Jackdaw Hill and Hull Point - the largest natural hole in England.
The walk then continues to Whernside, passing caves, becks and waterfalls on your way to Ribblehead. You then ascend to the 736m (2,415ft) Whernside summit via Ribblehead Viaduct, the Blue Clay Ridge, Little Dale Beck and Force Gill where you can see a series of waterfalls. You descend via Broadrake, Philpin Lane and Low Hill.
You then begin the ascent of Ingleborough, passing through the lovely Ingleborough Nature Reserve on your way to the 723 metres (2,372ft) summit. The route descends back to the finish point at Horton in Ribblesdale via Simon Fell, Grouse Butts and Sulber.
Many people aim to complete the challenge in under 12 hours. Those that do are invited to pay to join the Pen-y-ghent Cafe's privately owned 'Three Peaks of Yorkshire Club'.

Photos are copyrighted by their owners